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BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Big issues in the workplace - wages, overtime, time off, working conditions - are also major topics in the state Legislature. And this year, lawmakers delivered some tangible changes that will be felt in the pocketbook. At the top of the list, of course, is an increase in the minimum wage that swept through Democrat-dominated Sacramento, despite opposition from powerful business interests. But workers didn't get all of their agenda passed into law. "We were able to improve upon existing protections as well as support workers in a number of new ways, including increasing the minimum wage," said Steve Smith, a spokesman for the California Labor Federation.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By James Rainey
A string of actions by state officials and the National Labor Relations Board has strengthened the hand of truck drivers who say they need union representation to improve pay and working conditions for the thousands who transport cargo out of the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. In a settlement this week, one major trucking company agreed to post notices acknowledging the workers' right to organize - not previously a given because drivers were treated as contract workers, who are not subject to unionization.
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SPORTS
September 10, 2012 | By Lisa Dillman
Montreal defenseman Josh Gorges, who asserted that the NHL owners are treating a lockout as a "preferred option," said Monday that the players' union believes such a move would violate Canadian labor laws. To that end, there are legal maneuvers going on in two Canadian provinces, Quebec and Alberta. Last week, the National Hockey League Players Assn.  submitted a challenge at the Alberta Labor Relations Board in an attempt to prevent a lockout of the Calgary Flames and the Edmonton Oilers.
WORLD
January 8, 2014 | By Shashank Bengali
MUMBAI, India - In the latest salvo of a surprisingly bitter diplomatic feud, the Indian government on Wednesday ordered the U.S. Embassy in New Delhi to cease commercial activities at a popular club for Americans on its premises. The demand comes as U.S. officials weigh whether to prosecute an Indian diplomat in New York on charges that she obtained fraudulent visa documents for her housekeeper and violated labor laws by paying her far below minimum wage. The case involving Devyani Khobragade, the Indian deputy consul general in New York, has touched off a furor here and prompted officials in New Delhi to take a number of retaliatory steps against Americans in the Indian capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1998 | Associated Press
A 15-year-old Amish boy and his family are in a legal tug of war with federal child labor watchdogs. The dispute involves Daniel Mark Smucker's work around heavy presses in a harness factory, as well as other work by Amish children. "We believe that forced idleness in this age to be detrimental to our long-standing Amish way of raising our children and teaching them to become good productive citizens," Christ K.
NEWS
January 25, 1994
Unions say they'll shut down Spain for 24 hours Thursday in a general strike against government attempts to abolish labor laws that gave workers four decades of ironclad job security. The unions hope to force Prime Minister Felipe Gonzalez to scotch new laws that make it easier for employers to fire, transfer and change job descriptions of their workers. Foreign investors and Spanish businesses claim that the old laws are the main reason that Spain has Europe's highest jobless rate--23%.
BUSINESS
June 5, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
Factories making products in China and elsewhere for Nike Inc., Levi Strauss & Co. and five other companies violated labor laws, ranging from inadequate pay to failure to provide proper hearing protection, an industry-supported group said. A contractor for Nike in China paid its workers less than the minimum wage of 31 cents an hour, and a contractor for Liz Claiborne Inc. in China failed to register workers ages 16 to 18, the Fair Labor Assn. said in a report released Wednesday in Washington.
OPINION
August 2, 2005 | ROBERT SCHEER
Ten years ago this week, I was awakened by a phone tip that California labor department inspectors were about to free scores of Thai slave workers from a garment factory in El Monte. "Did you say slaves?" I asked my informant in disbelief, as I hurriedly dressed to go to the site. The Smithsonian Institution in 1998 made this case a part of its exhibit on U.S. sweatshops, calling it a low point in the sad history of U.S. exploitation of undocumented laborers.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2001
As someone who has lobbied members of the state Legislature to increase funding for more personnel in the Department of Industrial Relations, the Division of Labor Standards Enforcement and the Bureau of Field Enforcement, I wish to point out that the most severe declines in personnel and labor law enforcement took place during the administrations of former Govs. George Deukmejian and Pete Wilson ["Study Cites Drop in Enforcement of Labor Laws," June 30]. These two law-and-order Republicans were anything but, when it came to enforcing labor laws.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2002 | Bloomberg News
Tenet Healthcare Corp. has been sued by a union that claims it understaffs its hospitals and violates California labor laws by failing to pay for work breaks. Tenet spokesman Harry Anderson said the Santa Barbara-based company "absolutely rejects" the allegations. The United Nurses Assn. of California/Union of Health Care Professionals is in negotiations at two hospitals, and the suit appears to be "an attempt to try this in the courts," he said.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Big issues in the workplace - wages, overtime, time off, working conditions - are also major topics in the state Legislature. And this year, lawmakers delivered some tangible changes that will be felt in the pocketbook. At the top of the list, of course, is an increase in the minimum wage that swept through Democrat-dominated Sacramento, despite opposition from powerful business interests. But workers didn't get all of their agenda passed into law. "We were able to improve upon existing protections as well as support workers in a number of new ways, including increasing the minimum wage," said Steve Smith, a spokesman for the California Labor Federation.
OPINION
October 13, 2013 | By Steve Forbes
The heroic effort of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker in 2011 to rein in public employee unions has started to produce results. One of Walker's reforms required a majority of members to vote each year to certify the union as its representative. Since that simple change took effect, 13% of Wisconsin's teacher and public employee unions have been decertified because they can't get enough employees to vote to keep the union and pay union dues. When given a choice, it seems public employees themselves don't necessarily support union policies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2013
George Bignotti Chief mechanic for 7 Indy 500 winners George Bignotti, 97, who set a record as the chief mechanic for seven winners of the Indianapolis 500, died in his sleep of natural causes Fridayin Las Vegas, his daughter Mary Mendez said. As a mechanic, Bignotti won the Indy 500 with drivers A.J. Foyt in 1961 and 1964, Graham Hill in 1966, Al Unser in 1970 and 1971, Gordon Johncock in 1973 and Tom Sneva in 1983. Bignotti also holds the record for most wins overall in Indy-car history with more than 80 victories.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Anita Herrera spent years cleaning offices in San Diego, but her boss never gave her a legally required lunch and rest break during a seven-hour shift. When she eventually asked for a breather, her employer cut her hours. So, in 2009, Herrera filed a complaint with the California Labor Commissioner's Office. Investigators corroborated the allegation and got a court order requiring her former employer to pay her $20,000 in penalties for the wage-and-hour law violations.
BUSINESS
May 16, 2013 | By Alana Semuels, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - The next wave of union protesters isn't blue collar. It's lawyers, paralegals, secretaries, helicopter pilots, judges, insurance agents and podiatrists. These white-collar workers are not exactly the picture of the labor movement, but they are becoming a more essential part of it as they turn to unions for help in a tough economy as bosses try to squeeze out more profits. "Employers have been downsizing, asking employees to take on larger roles, making them work more hours," said Nicole Korkolis, spokeswoman for the Office and Professional Employees International Union.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2012 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Signature gatherers and protesters may be ejected from privately owned walkways outside a store, but labor unions may picket there peacefully, the California Supreme Court decided Thursday. The state high court unanimously agreed that private walkways in front of stores, unlike public areas in shopping malls, are not open forums accessible to anyone who wants to assemble to express a view. But the justices split, 6 to 1, in upholding two state laws that prevent courts from issuing injunctions against peaceful labor pickets on private property.
NEWS
July 17, 1997 | Reuters
Hong Kong's Beijing-approved council flexed its muscles in a fierce showdown with unions Wednesday by suspending a series of laws on labor rights. Clashing head-on with labor unions, members of the Provisional Legislative Council suspended four of seven laws enacted just before China took back the 156-year-old British colony from London on July 1.
NEWS
July 24, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John H. Fanning, a leading expert on the nation's labor laws who served for 25 years on the National Labor Relations Board and was its chairman for four, died Saturday at Georgetown University Hospital of kidney failure. He was 73. In his five terms on the NLRB, Fanning participated in more than 25,000 rulings on unfair labor practices. Although a registered Democrat, he was appointed to the board by Republican President Dwight D.
BUSINESS
December 11, 2012 | By Alana Semuels
The Michigan Legislature on Wednesday gave final passage to two "right-to-work" bills that could diminish labor power in a state once dominated by autoworker unions. Although political maneuvering continues, the bills are likely to be delivered to Gov. Rick Snyder as soon as Wednesday. He has pledged to sign them. The first bill, which covered public-sector employees, passed the House 58-51, and was followed by a bill covering private-sector employees, including the United Auto Workers, which passed 58-52.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2012 | By Adolfo Flores
Outside a Wal-Mart in Duarte about 7:30 a.m. Friday, nearly 50 protesters in lime-green T-shirts walked in a circle outside the supercenter, beating a drum, pumping their fists in the air and waving signs that read "On Strike" and "Freedom to Speak Out. " The group, Organization United for Respect at Wal-Mart , is advocating for higher wages, better healthcare and more consistent hours. OUR Wal-Mart organizers said 1,000 protests were taking place...
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