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Labor Laws

OPINION
January 2, 1994 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, Harry Bernstein was for many years The Times' labor writer
It's hard to know where and how corporate executives draw the line between their legitimate quest for profits and ugly greed when they are fighting unions or slashing the size of their work force. But either way, workers almost always get trashed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1997 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some contractors who have received federal earthquake repair loans have repeatedly violated labor laws by underpaying their workers, but most have not been criminally prosecuted, documents and interviews show. Los Angeles housing officials who oversee the federally funded loan program have documented 17 cases of contractors who failed to pay 155 workers the "prevailing wages" required by state and federal labor laws.
OPINION
August 15, 1993 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, Harry Bernstein was for many years The Times' labor writer.
President Clinton leaned only slightly to the left by nominating the moderate Stanford law professor William Gould IV as chairman of the National Labor Relations Board. Yet his appointment, as non-controversial as it should be, has triggered opposition from some corporate executives and right-wing congressional Republicans, who fear Gould may orchestrate opposition to their attempts to create a "union-free environment" in the United States.
OPINION
April 10, 1994 | HARRY BERNSTEIN, Harry Bernstein was for many years The Times' labor writer
It is nonsense to say that workers in our democratic country have the freedom to strike without fear of being of fired, when they can be "permanently replaced." Yet top Republicans in the Senate are promising to filibuster to death a bill that would end this absurdity. The measure, titled the Workplace Fairness Act, easily passed the House. A Senate majority supports it, including some Republicans. But even the GOP filibuster, which may well kill it, isn't enough for the union-haters.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1996 | SHARON WAXMAN, WASHINGTON POST
After five years of working with babies on the set of "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman," nurse Laura Simmons was troubled last month when year-old twins were brought to work on the show at 8 a.m. and didn't go home until 9 p.m. The law required that the babies be on the set for no more than 4 1/2 hours. For a recent cable movie, a mother says that she brought her 3-month-old triplets to work as extras at 10 a.m. and said she was allowed to take them home at 7 p.m.
BUSINESS
June 30, 2001 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Labor law enforcement has declined markedly in California despite evidence of widespread violations in low-wage restaurant, janitorial and garment jobs, according to an analysis by the California Works Foundation. The labor-backed group found that by several measures--funding, staffing ratios and number of inspections--enforcement of laws covering wages, hours, health and safety was lower in 2000 than at the turn of each of the last three decades.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1992 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In black panties embellished with gold studs, rhinestones and tiny mirrors, Lexis sashayed down the stage. Soft lights glittered on her matching bra, her gold garter and her gold thigh-high boots. Around the club, a bouncer in a tuxedo picked up a wrapper someone had dropped on the soft carpet. A waitress, wearing a tuxedo-style blouse, solicited drink orders. "No pressure," the waitress said. "No two-drink minimum, nothing like that."
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a politically irresistible idea: make Congress abide by the same workplace rules as the rest of the country. Passed overwhelmingly a year ago during the heady early days of the Republican takeover, the Congressional Accountability Act was the first item of the GOP's "contract with America" to become law. Now is the time, its GOP proponents argued, for Congress to get a taste of its own regulatory medicine.
OPINION
November 26, 2011
The Times' Nov. 23 editorial, "Clueless candidates," which criticized Newt Gingrich for his call to loosen child labor laws and allow kids to work as janitors at their schools, prompted reader Mike Gallagher to write the following defense of the former House speaker's proposal: "I can only assume that the editor did not work as a child, unlike the children of most small-business owners. I've never known a working kid who didn't have time for homework, so long as there wasn't a long transportation requirement.
NEWS
February 23, 1994 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ludmilla V. Gubareva once belonged to the ranks of Russia's invisible women: the army of long-suffering middle-aged babushkas who scrub, sweep, mop and even shovel snow but get neither good wages nor respect. Now the pleasant, plump, 54-year-old charwoman and her 59-year-old sister are suing the American-managed Radisson Slavayanskaya Hotel for wrongful dismissal. They have astounded their downtrodden countrywomen by demanding $10 million each in damages.
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