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OPINION
September 8, 2007
Re "Labor relations," editorial, Sept. 3 How interesting to consider the evolution over the years of The Times concerning the labor movement. What a shame that, over the many years of labor-management relations, workers and others have died trying to obtain some of the profits that generously enrich capitalist management and individual entrepreneurs, The Times included.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
March 29, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
RIDGELAND, Miss. - Over the bass beat coming from the band, the Rev. Charles Miller is leading his congregation in boisterous prayer. As his voice rings out, blessing the community and the oppressed, the congregation affirming each line, he names a new group that he says deserves God's attention. "We pray for the employees who are working at Nissan," Miller says, and the dozens of women and men in the pews say amen to that, too. "We pray you wake up the conscience of those that are oppressing them," he says.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Among the issues being discussed at the quadrennial AFL-CIO convention this week in Los Angeles is how to make the labor movement more relevant. Looking for ways to reverse labor's declining political clout and declining membership rolls, the labor federation is proposing to strike up alliances with progressive groups, day laborer organizations and community worker centers. The resolution aims to bring into the fold hundreds of thousands of new members from organizations such as the Sierra Club, the NAACP, the National Council of La Raza and others.
NEWS
February 13, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Thursday is the second of three days of a union-organizing vote at Volkswagen's Tennessee auto assembly plant, and it's being tracked like a congressional special election. Is it a bellwether for the state of modern labor? Or is it a one-off that says nothing of significance beyond the confines of the VW factory floor? It's a bit of both. The vote has attracted an extraordinary amount of outside interest and pressure , including misleading public billboards, bizarre claims on local talk-radio stations and a general frothing from the anti-union right that worker-management cooperation is the first step toward Stalinism.
OPINION
June 26, 2005 | Nelson Lichtenstein, Nelson Lichtenstein teaches history at UC Santa Barbara and directs the Center for Work, Labor and Democracy there.
The announcement this month that five prominent labor leaders were forming their own organization, "Change to Win," may well be the first step toward a breakup of the AFL-CIO at its annual convention next month. Conservatives in politics and business are gleeful at the prospect, while many ordinary citizens merely shrug their shoulders.
NEWS
November 10, 1992 | WILLIAM R. LONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Argentina's labor movement crippled factories and commuter train service Monday in its first general strike against President Carlos Saul Menem's administration. The union show of force reflected worrisome signs for Menem's largely successful economic policies. The one-day strike also underscored a growing power struggle between Menem and the labor movement, which helped elect him in 1989.
NEWS
October 29, 1987 | United Press International
Teamsters President Jackie Presser, declaring that his union is back in labor's fold for "eternity," told AFL-CIO delegates today that labor must close ranks to defend its members and political agenda. Presser predicted that a unified labor movement would create the "greatest political giant this country has ever seen."
NEWS
July 23, 1991 | BURT A. FOLKART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Earl Robinson, the American balladeer whose tributes to the working man include the celebrated lament "Joe Hill," has been killed in a car accident in Washington. The King County medical examiner's office said late Sunday that Robinson, 81, was killed Saturday night outside his native Seattle after his car was struck by a four-wheel-drive vehicle. The other driver, a 64-year-old man, suffered minor injuries. The accident is under investigation.
NEWS
May 18, 1988 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, Times Labor Writer
In an extremely close election Tuesday, Harvard University's clerical and technical workers voted in favor of union representation, culminating an organizing campaign that lasted more than a decade. About 51% of the employees, who ranged from secretaries to scientific instrument makers, voted in favor of representation by the Harvard Union of Clerical and Technical Workers and 49% voted against the union. The vote was 1,530 for and 1,486 against, with 41 challenged ballots, officials said.
BUSINESS
November 19, 1993 | STUART SILVERSTEIN and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The fierce battle that U.S. unions waged against the North American Free Trade Agreement, despite ending in bitter defeat, may give new vigor to the American labor movement. Unions emerged from the fight against NAFTA with new potential allies, both at home and across international borders.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The future of public-sector labor unions may rest with conservative Justice Antonin Scalia. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court debated whether teachers and other public employees should continue to be required to pay union fees, even if they don't join or support its activities. Since a 1977 ruling, the high court has upheld such mandatory fees, known as "fair-share" dues. But in recent years, some justices have raised doubts about whether the practice violates the First Amendment, and during oral arguments several conservatives appeared ready to strike it down.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Julie Cart
The mission of America's 400 national parks is to reflect the country's history - no matter how uncomfortable or unflattering - which is why some contain depictions of slavery, the fight for women's suffrage, Japanese internment and the struggle for civil rights. Now that archive could include the contributions of Latinos through the telling of the often tempestuous story of Cesar Chavez. The National Park Service on Thursday announced plans to establish the Cesar Chavez National Historic Park, to recognize the achievements of the activist and the farm labor movement he led. Chavez, who advocated for fair wages and humane conditions for field workers in California and elsewhere, also will be honored as an environmentalist and nonviolent human rights advocate.
WORLD
September 28, 2013 | By Radhouane Addala and Laura King
TUNIS, Tunisia -- Shaken by weeks of massive street protests, Tunisia's Islamist-led government has edged closer to stepping aside, agreeing Saturday to enter talks aimed at setting up a caretaker administration, participants in the negotiations said. Tunisia's popular uprising nearly three years ago threw off decades of autocratic rule and touched off protest movements that rolled across the Arab world. But, as also happened in Egypt, the Islamist-dominated coalition that subsequently came to power proved deeply unpopular, triggering large-scale unrest.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez and Kate Linthicum
The leader of the nation's largest labor federation denounced several top American corporations and the U.S. Supreme Court for contributing to the erosion of the middle class. In a fiery speech to thousands of union members at the AFL-CIO convention in downtown Los Angeles, President Richard Trumka denounced the "powerful forces in America today who want our country to be run by and for the rich. " He singled out longtime union targets Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and McDonald's Corp., saying "their whole business model is about keeping the people who work for them poor.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Among the issues being discussed at the quadrennial AFL-CIO convention this week in Los Angeles is how to make the labor movement more relevant. Looking for ways to reverse labor's declining political clout and declining membership rolls, the labor federation is proposing to strike up alliances with progressive groups, day laborer organizations and community worker centers. The resolution aims to bring into the fold hundreds of thousands of new members from organizations such as the Sierra Club, the NAACP, the National Council of La Raza and others.
BUSINESS
September 9, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
On the first full day of the AFL-CIO convention in Los Angeles, labor leaders were expected to debate and vote on a resolution that they hope will bring into the fold new non-union groups, adding hundreds of thousands of new members.  The country's largest labor federation is at a crossroads, seeing its political power wane as union membership rolls decline and state legislatures have curbed collective bargaining.  One strategy labor leaders...
BUSINESS
July 19, 1988 | HARRY BERNSTEIN
Gov. George Deukmejian's Administration is about to deliver another blow to California workers by legalizing the 12-hour workday without overtime pay--breaking with an eight-hour day tradition that began, at least for women, 75 years ago.
OPINION
May 3, 1998 | Nelson Lichtenstein, Nelson Lichtenstein, a historian at the University of Virginia, is author of "The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit: Walter Reuther and the Fate of American Labor."
Now that government investigators have cleared James P. Hoffa to make a new run for the Teamster presidency, his election to the top job in the nation's most powerful union would seem a shoo-in. His opponent is a relative unknown, Ken Hall, an aide to former Teamster President Ron Carey, who was disqualified in November after a federal election officer found that an elaborate money-laundering scheme, condoned by Carey, had tainted the 1996 union election.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
The quadrennial AFL-CIO convention kicks off in Los Angeles on Sunday with the aim to coalesce unions and progressive groups who are here to strategize ways to reinvigorate the flailing labor movement. With about 5,000 attendees expected to attend the gathering, labor leaders and others have prepared an agenda covering a variety of issues and resolutions that include immigration reform, voting rights, racial justice and the Affordable Care Act. The convention has brought together new allies to the labor movement who are hammering out a workable plan to combine the memberships of unions and groups that include the Sierra Club, the NAACP and the National Council of La Raza.  Quiz: How well do you know California's economy?
BUSINESS
September 8, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) urged labor leaders Sunday to prepare for an uphill battle as they seek to strengthen the labor movement, beat back "powerful interests" and enact financial reform.   Warren made a speech at the quadrennial convention of the AFL-CIO, which kicked off Sunday in Los Angeles. The labor federation's convention has brought together traditional union groups with new, progressive allies such as the Sierra Club and the NAACP.  Warren, the freshman senator and newest member  of the Senate Banking Committee, voiced her support for the labor movement, which has seen its political power wane in recent years as union membership has dropped.  Photos: Jobs with the longest and shortest workdays "In every fight to build opportunity in this country ... in every fight for working families, we have been on the front lines because our agenda is America's agenda," Warren said.  "But let's be clear, we have always had to run uphill," she said.
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