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NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Bob Hawke called a general election for March 24, saying he will stand for a record fifth term in the vote, which is expected to focus on economic issues. Hawke's ruling Labor Party holds a majority of 83 seats in the 148-seat House of Representatives, 18 more than the conservative Liberal-Country Party coalition. Half of the Senate's 76 seats will also be contested if Governor General Bill Hayden accepts Hawke's March 24 proposal.
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NEWS
February 16, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Prime Minister Bob Hawke called a general election for March 24, saying he will stand for a record fifth term in the vote, which is expected to focus on economic issues. Hawke's ruling Labor Party holds a majority of 83 seats in the 148-seat House of Representatives, 18 more than the conservative Liberal-Country Party coalition. Half of the Senate's 76 seats will also be contested if Governor General Bill Hayden accepts Hawke's March 24 proposal.
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WORLD
November 26, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
Australian Prime Minister-elect Kevin Rudd took advice on how to ratify the 1997 Kyoto Protocol on cutting greenhouse gas emissions and fielded phone calls from President Bush and other world leaders the day after a sweeping election victory. The victory for Rudd's Labor Party swings Australia toward the left after almost 12 years of conservative rule and puts it at odds with key ally Washington on two crucial policy issues -- Iraq and global warming.
WORLD
October 23, 2003 | Maura Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
President Bush delivered a personal "thank you" to Australia today, telling a joint session of the Australian Federal Parliament that "we value, more than ever, the unbroken friendship between the Australian and American peoples." But a vocal minority in the chamber were less enamored of the American president than he was with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1988 | BARRY M. HORSTMAN, Times Staff Writer
When an election ends, victorious candidates look forward to a new challenge, while losers quietly return to careers put on hold during campaigns. But for the political consultants who helped shape a race's outcome, the job--and, more importantly, the salary--usually ends when the votes are counted, regardless of who won or lost.
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