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BUSINESS
January 23, 1985 | Harry Bernstein
The intriguing labor-relations experiment designed to bring Eastern Airlines' workers and managers together to save the economically troubled company is proving to be as difficult and tempestuous as a troubled love affair. But if successful, the plan should be a model of labor-management marriages and speed up the still extremely limited movement toward worker representation on corporate boards of directors. Just five years ago, in an unprecedented move, Chrysler Corp.
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OPINION
January 20, 2014 | By Matthew Finkin and Thomas Kochan
Works councils - elected bodies representing all workers in a plant, both blue and white collar - are acclaimed as one of the best, most innovative features of Germany's labor relations system. They have been shown to enhance efficiency, adaptability and cooperation. By supporting the use of work sharing (agreeing to reduce everyone's hours rather than laying some people off), for example, these councils helped Germany experience less unemployment during the Great Recession and a faster, more robust recovery since then.
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NATIONAL
November 21, 2012 | By David Horsey
The Great American Twinkie Crisis illuminates what is wrong with the relationship between management and labor in this country. Hostess, the company that since the 1930s has provided our nation with snacks that are nearly indestructible, now threatens to go out of business and leave us bereft of Ding Dongs, Sno Balls, Ho Ho's, CupCakes, Wonder Bread and a variety of other baked goods that are probably not good for us but, at least to a kid's palate, taste...
BUSINESS
January 15, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
The National Labor Relations Board, an independent federal agency tasked with policing bad behavior by employers, is targeting Wal-Mart Stores Inc. over the retail behemoth's alleged crackdown on its protesting workers. The NLRB filed a formal complaint Wednesday against the Bentonville, Ark. chain, alleging that the company violated the rights of more than 60 employees rallying over workplace conditions in 14 states - including California. Some experts said the NLRB may be trying to establish itself as a force to be feared, and not just in the unionized workplaces that have traditionally been its stomping grounds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1994
The relationship between U.S. employers and employees is in the middle of a historic shift whose outcome is far from revealed. The labor market certainties of the booming 1950s and '60s have been replaced with ambivalent and unforeseen labor force developments, such as those that President Clinton and leaders of the other major industrial nations tried to puzzle out at their jobs summit in Detroit last week. In the United States seemingly permanent changes include leaner work forces.
SPORTS
July 19, 1998 | From Associated Press
Former New York Mets first baseman Keith Hernandez believes last week's election of Bud Selig as baseball commissioner will hurt labor relations. Speaking last week at a panel on baseball in the 21st century, Hernandez said he didn't follow baseball for four or five years after his retirement following the 1990 season, but was glad to see the game rebounding after the 1994-95 strike and World Series cancellation.
BUSINESS
August 28, 1998 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sudden and unexpected departure this month of Brian Walton after 13 years as the top administrator of the union representing West Coast film and TV writers might be a signal that Hollywood is in for a more contentious era in labor relations.
NEWS
February 13, 1998
Alfred Hale Caplan, 79, a labor relations consultant who aided Cesar Chavez. A native of Chicago, Caplan grew up in Los Angeles and began working as a truck driver for Thrifty Drug. He soon became a shop steward and then a leader of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, which represented workers at Thrifty, and by age 22, was an international organizing representative.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1985 | Harry Bernstein
Executives of General Motors Corp., the world's largest auto maker, and the United Auto Workers say they have drawn up plans for building the new Saturn small car that could usher in a new era of industrial peace and prosperity at GM and become a model of excellence. Their expectations might be too high, but clearly they are at least trying--with courage and imagination--to take this nation along an enlightened path of labor relations.
NEWS
May 18, 1991
A memorial service is scheduled Wednesday for Roger W. Goubeaux, Los Angeles area labor relations leader, who died May 7 at the age of 59. The service will be at 7 p.m. at St. Paul the Apostle Church, 10750 Ohio Ave., Los Angeles. Goubeaux died of a heart attack in his sleep at his Westwood home. He had been director of the National Labor Relations Board's Region 31, a seven-county district based in Los Angeles, for the past 12 years.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON - The Senate has confirmed five members of the National Labor Relations Board, meeting the final conditions of an agreement forestalling a change to the chamber's rules that allow a minority to block action using a filibuster. But the brinkmanship that took the Senate to the verge of what was dubbed a "nuclear" showdown could return this fall, as the Democratic majority seeks to move to other stalled nominations. The deal brokered by Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Sen. Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 2013 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory on Tuesday said it planned to appeal a National Labor Relations Board judge's order to rescind disciplinary actions against five engineers and scientists. "Caltech respectfully disagrees with the decision and intends to appeal," JPL spokeswoman Veronica McGregor said in a brief statement. Administrative Law Judge William G. Kocol had ordered JPL, which is operated by the California Institute of Technology for NASA, to remove disciplinary letters from the employee files of the five.
BUSINESS
March 19, 2013 | Michael Hiltzik
In recent years, Prime Healthcare has built a reputation as a take-no-prisoners company willing to run roughshod over patients and employees alike in its quest for profits - $283 million on revenue of $1.6 billion in 2010, according to a financial statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The closely held Ontario firm, which owns or operates 21 hospitals including 14 in California, has received a federal subpoena related to allegations that it has inflated its billings to Medicare.
BUSINESS
January 25, 2013 | By David G. Savage and Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court, in a far-reaching decision that could cripple operations at two agencies, sharply limited the president's power to bypass Senate confirmation and make so-called recess appointments. A three-judge panel decided that President Obama violated the Constitution last year by appointing three members to the National Labor Relations Board while the Senate was not meeting. But the broader implications of Friday's ruling mean the Senate's Republican minority can all but halt the work of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and the NLRB by preventing the president from appointing its leaders or board members.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2012 | Alana Semuels
Labor relations in the Midwest reached a new level of acrimony as Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder abruptly signed legislation placing limits on unions, setting up a bitter political battle that could resonate nationwide. It's a stunning development for a blue state that's been known as a place friendly to labor, where autoworkers and their families from Detroit to Saginaw have benefited from generous union contracts. An estimated 15,000 workers descended on the state Capitol in Lansing on Tuesday to protest against the bills, scuffling at times with police and conservatives who also set up shop at the Capitol.
NATIONAL
November 21, 2012 | By David Horsey
The Great American Twinkie Crisis illuminates what is wrong with the relationship between management and labor in this country. Hostess, the company that since the 1930s has provided our nation with snacks that are nearly indestructible, now threatens to go out of business and leave us bereft of Ding Dongs, Sno Balls, Ho Ho's, CupCakes, Wonder Bread and a variety of other baked goods that are probably not good for us but, at least to a kid's palate, taste...
SPORTS
June 11, 1992 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American and National league owners, meeting separately in New York Wednesday, gave straw-vote approval to the purchase of the Seattle Mariners by a group fronted financially by Hiroshi Yamauchi, president of Nintendo Co. Ltd. of Japan. The formal vote will be taken in a joint owners meeting today. NL owners, according to one, voiced unanimous approval of the sale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1998 | DANIEL J.B. MITCHELL, Daniel J.B. Mitchell, a professor in the Anderson Graduate School of Management and the School of Public Policy and Social Research at UCLA, teaches labor relations
Much of the media attention on the General Motors strike has centered on its economic impact: lost paychecks, lost profits, car dealers running low on inventory. But there is more at stake in the GM dispute. Unions (not just the United Auto Workers) and unionized employers (not just GM) must be concerned about a fundamental breakdown in the normal operating procedure of American labor relations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2012 | Kate Linthicum and David Zahniser
Despite raucous protests and threats of a lawsuit from labor unions, the Los Angeles City Council voted Tuesday to roll back pension benefits and boost the retirement age to 65 for new civilian employees. The 14-0 vote represented a major victory for Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, who has been pushing pension reform for months in the face of criticism from labor leaders who have compared him to Scott Walker, the Wisconsin governor who has battled unions for much of his first term. Passage of the plan was shepherded by council President Herb Wesson, who told the rowdy crowd of union members that the pension changes were unavoidable.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2012 | Teresa Watanabe
They're both large, urban school districts under fire from teachers unions for pushing to incorporate student test scores into instructors' evaluations. But few observers expect tensions over performance reviews to ignite a strike in Los Angeles, as it did in Chicago, because of myriad differences in conditions surrounding the two cities' school districts. Chicago teachers and the school district reached a tentative agreement Friday after a five-day strike by 26,000 instructors.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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