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Labor Shortages

BUSINESS
January 13, 1989 | Associated Press
Employers increasingly need to tap the growing pool of older workers to avoid major labor shortages, but such efforts are stymied because the elderly face many disincentives to work beyond retirement age, say two government studies released Thursday. The need to retain, and in some cases retrain, older workers is particularly acute for highly skilled jobs, the reports said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 2001
Even as unemployment rises, Frank del Olmo presses for a guest-worker program ("Quick Fix Isn't Enough to Cure the INS," Commentary, Nov. 18). "Who," he asks, "could have foreseen the demand for foreign computer specialists by companies such as Microsoft?" Well, Congress thought it foresaw the demand. It let in a flood of computer programmers just in time for the high-tech crash. In truth, unending immigration can't end labor shortages, it only guarantees overpopulation. We can't predict labor demand in a free-market economy any more than we can predict unemployment or stock prices.
BUSINESS
June 24, 1991 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with severe labor shortages, industries in Taiwan, Singapore and Hong Kong--three of Asia's economic tigers--are relying increasingly on foreign workers from less-developed countries such as the Philippines and Indonesia. As a result, Asian labor is becoming a more mobile, transnational human resource--making the labor-poor and labor-rich nations of the Pacific increasingly interdependent and creating new opportunities for firms engaged in engineering, construction and labor contracting.
NEWS
June 24, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Amid complaints of serious farm worker shortages in the West, the Reagan Administration Tuesday revised its rules on granting legal resident status to hundreds of thousands of illegal workers and expanded the legalization program.
NATIONAL
December 12, 2008 | Teresa Watanabe, Watanabe is a Times staff writer.
Aiming to ease farm labor shortages, the Bush administration issued sweeping changes to the nation's agricultural guest worker program Thursday, but California growers said the action would have only a minimal effect on their needs. The controversial rules, many months in the making by U.S.
NEWS
March 14, 1990 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Census Bureau officials in California expressed concern Tuesday that the agency has failed so far to attract a large-enough pool of applicants to tap for the temporary work force needed to count heads in the state starting in April. Census offices up and down the state have experienced problems finding workers to fill posts, with the problem particularly acute in Los Angeles, Orange and San Diego counties, as well as urban sections of Northern California, federal authorities said.
BUSINESS
November 28, 1990 | TIMOTHY H. WILLARD, TIMOTHY H. WILLARD is managing editor of the Futurist, a publication of the World Future Society in Bethesda, Md
A healthy infrastructure--city streets, interstate highways, bridges, waterworks and sewer systems--is vital to business. But the United States is facing major infrastructure problems in the next decade and beyond that will make "business as usual" increasingly difficult. Many of the problems will be aggravated by demographic trends that also will affect business.
BUSINESS
July 2, 1996 | From Bloomberg News Service
It seems you just can't find good help these days if you're a small-business owner. Take the new employee Ken Heller asked to arrange a batch of files in chronological order. She couldn't. "She didn't know what 'chronological' meant," said Heller, the owner of a Denver environmental services firm.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | SIOBHAN HUGHES, BLOOMBERG NEWS
Temporary workers are among the first casualties in a slowing economy as businesses grapple with sluggish demand and struggle to cut costs. The number of people employed by temporary-personnel supply firms has declined for six straight months after reaching a record 3.89 million in September, the same month that unemployment fell to a 30-year low, Labor Department figures show.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2006 | Leonard Anderson, Reuters
Help Wanted: Line workers. Power plant operators. Engineers. And more. Apply now. With an aging workforce walking toward the retirement door, U.S. electric utilities are struggling to find new employees, especially linemen who keep power flowing through the high-voltage cables. "This is a huge problem," said Stephen P. Reynolds, chairman and chief executive of Puget Energy Inc., the biggest utility in Washington state. "Young people are not jumping for joy to become linemen."
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