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NEWS
September 24, 1991 | Washington Post
Janet L. Norwood, who has served as commissioner of labor statistics since 1979, will leave her post to join the Urban Institute at the end of this year. A spokeswoman at the Bureau of Labor Statistics said Norwood is leaving government to speak and write on labor market issues from the private sector.
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BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Americans rushed out to shop as frigid weather lifted in March, propelling retail sales at the fastest pace in a year and a half. The gauge from the Commerce Department surged 1.1% last month from February in its biggest leap since September 2012. Sales boomed 3.8% from March 2013. The strong sales, which beat economists' expectations for a 1% increase, bolstered hopes that the economy would continue to gain momentum after struggling through an especially harsh winter. "One month doesn't answer all the questions, and it's not like we have all-over-the-place exploding growth," said NPD Group analyst Marshal Cohen.
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NEWS
April 26, 1987 | IVAN ZVERINA, United Press International
More women than ever before now are holding jobs around the world, latest U.N. labor statistics show, and ironically more are also unemployed. In fact, in many countries unemployment grows faster among women than among men and decreases in women's unemployment are smaller than in men's. The proportion of women in the work force has increased in 21 industrialized and 13 developing nations, according to the new Yearbook of Labor Statistics issued by the International Labor Organization.
BUSINESS
March 7, 2014 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- The weather was unusually bad in much of the country last month, so why was Friday's government jobs report surprisingly good? The economy added 175,000 net new jobs in February, up from a revised 129,000 the previous month. The figure exceeded analyst expectations of about 150,000 jobs, and some were predicting a much lower number because of the bitter cold and snow. Labor Department data show the weather cost workers significant hours on the job. PHOTOS: Federal Reserve chairs through the years But partly because of the way the government crunches the numbers, the weather didn't appear to have cost the economy jobs in any major way. "Anecdotally, just walking around the streets in the Midwest and the Northeast, you would think that economic activity had slowed and that includes hiring by businesses, but we're not really seeing it in the numbers," said Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at the Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi in New York.
NEWS
October 30, 1991 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Janet L. Norwood, veteran U.S. commissioner of labor statistics, decried Washington's lack of leadership on economic problems Tuesday, saying that the country is being polarized by the growth of the most severe gap between the poorest and richest Americans that she has seen in 38 years of government service.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
A new report by the Milken Institute could provide fresh ammunition to proponents of an expanded state film and TV tax credit. Set to be released Thursday, the study entitled "A Hollywood Exit: What California Must Do to Remain Competitive in Entertainment -- and Keep Jobs," paints a bleak picture of the jobs California has lost to New York and other rivals due to the proliferation of film tax credits and rebates. Among the key findings: California lost 16,137 film and TV industry jobs between 2004 and 2012, an 11% decline, according to figures from U.S. Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By Jane Margolis and Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco
Computer science is driving innovation across all fields, so it makes sense that the Los Angeles Board of Education wants to provide its students with access to the latest technology. Students who develop expertise in computer science will have automatic career advantages. But is the district taking the right steps? The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has found that computing occupations are among the fastest-growing job categories in the United States and that such jobs pay about 75% more than the national median annual salary.
NATIONAL
June 11, 2013 | By Cindy Carmcamo
TUCSON -- Children in the Southwest are especially vulnerable to hunger, according to a new study ranking New Mexico as having the highest rates of childhood hunger in the nation. New Mexico is the most food-insecure state for youths in the nation, according to a report by Feeding America, a hunger relief charity and network of more than 200 food banks in the nation. Arizona ranked third for childhood hunger , with Nevada at eighth place, Texas at ninth and California at twelfth.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2014 | By Tiffany Hsu
Americans rushed out to shop as frigid weather lifted in March, propelling retail sales at the fastest pace in a year and a half. The gauge from the Commerce Department surged 1.1% last month from February in its biggest leap since September 2012. Sales boomed 3.8% from March 2013. The strong sales, which beat economists' expectations for a 1% increase, bolstered hopes that the economy would continue to gain momentum after struggling through an especially harsh winter. "One month doesn't answer all the questions, and it's not like we have all-over-the-place exploding growth," said NPD Group analyst Marshal Cohen.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The share of American workers belonging to labor unions held steady in 2013, remaining unchanged at 11.3%, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. Overall, 14.5 million workers belong to unions, that's down from 17.7 million in 1983, the year for which comparable data were first available, the agency said.  American labor has seen a steep decline in its membership for years, and the report released Friday suggests that -- at least for now -- the diminishing membership has halted.  [Updated 8:40 a.m. PST, Jan. 24 : Richard Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO, the country's largest labor federation, said the report showed gains in some parts of the country, including the South.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
A new report by the Milken Institute could provide fresh ammunition to proponents of an expanded state film and TV tax credit. Set to be released Thursday, the study entitled "A Hollywood Exit: What California Must Do to Remain Competitive in Entertainment -- and Keep Jobs," paints a bleak picture of the jobs California has lost to New York and other rivals due to the proliferation of film tax credits and rebates. Among the key findings: California lost 16,137 film and TV industry jobs between 2004 and 2012, an 11% decline, according to figures from U.S. Labor Department's Bureau of Labor Statistics.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2014 | By Alana Semuels
Union leaders were still reeling three days after their devastating defeat at a Tennessee Volkswagen plant, but the leader of the AFL-CIO said labor would keep trying to organize workers in the South - even if it's an uphill battle. "We are committed to helping those workers in the South raise their wages, get better working conditions and get a stronger voice on the job in making decisions that affect their livelihood," Richard Trumka told reporters Monday. Trumka was in Houston to talk about the year ahead with the executive council of his coalition, which represents 56 unions and 12.5 million workers.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
The bitterly cold winter weather has helped to chill sales for teen apparel companies, especially one with a focus on summer and surf clothes and that California lifestyle. For Pacific Sunwear of California Inc., the freezing temperatures that stretched across the country and deep into the South is putting the icing on a difficult fiscal fourth quarter, which ended Feb. 1. PacSun, as it is more familiarly known, sells branded and proprietary casual apparel, accessories and footwear for teens and young adults.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
The share of American workers belonging to labor unions held steady in 2013, remaining unchanged at 11.3%, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday. Overall, 14.5 million workers belong to unions, that's down from 17.7 million in 1983, the year for which comparable data were first available, the agency said.  American labor has seen a steep decline in its membership for years, and the report released Friday suggests that -- at least for now -- the diminishing membership has halted.  [Updated 8:40 a.m. PST, Jan. 24 : Richard Trumka, president of the AFL-CIO, the country's largest labor federation, said the report showed gains in some parts of the country, including the South.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Call it a tale of two sides of the capitalist system: JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s Jamie Dimon got $20 million for being CEO in 2013; each Oakland Raiderette got $1,250 for kicking up her heels in the same year. The Raiderettes are suing ; presumably, Dimon is smiling - all the way to the bank. True, the Raiders had another lousy year in 2013, though I'm not sure how much blame can be put on the cheerleaders. But as Forbes' Halah Touryalai wrote about our banker friend : “Despite what was arguably the bank's worst year under Dimon's reign, JPM's board is awarding the CEO a 74% raise which includes over $18 million in restricted stock.” Or, to quote a Raiderette: “Sis, boom, boooooooo.” It isn't fair.
OPINION
January 19, 2014 | By Jane Margolis and Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco
Computer science is driving innovation across all fields, so it makes sense that the Los Angeles Board of Education wants to provide its students with access to the latest technology. Students who develop expertise in computer science will have automatic career advantages. But is the district taking the right steps? The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics has found that computing occupations are among the fastest-growing job categories in the United States and that such jobs pay about 75% more than the national median annual salary.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Paul Whitefield
Call it a tale of two sides of the capitalist system: JPMorgan Chase & Co.'s Jamie Dimon got $20 million for being CEO in 2013; each Oakland Raiderette got $1,250 for kicking up her heels in the same year. The Raiderettes are suing ; presumably, Dimon is smiling - all the way to the bank. True, the Raiders had another lousy year in 2013, though I'm not sure how much blame can be put on the cheerleaders. But as Forbes' Halah Touryalai wrote about our banker friend : “Despite what was arguably the bank's worst year under Dimon's reign, JPM's board is awarding the CEO a 74% raise which includes over $18 million in restricted stock.” Or, to quote a Raiderette: “Sis, boom, boooooooo.” It isn't fair.
NEWS
August 2, 2013 | By Sandra Hernandez
As The Times' reported Friday, home health aide is among the fastest-growing occupations in the state, according to the California Employment Development Department. The number of aides is projected to grow by more than 50% in the coming years. One reason for the uptick in demand is that a wave of baby boomers has started retiring. No doubt, some of these new seniors will eventually require the help of aides, including live-in attendants. But while the job may be in demand, the pay is not so great.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2013 | By Walter Hamilton
When potential employers ask Tracy Blakeley about her personal life, she assumes they're not making idle chit chat. They're trying to figure out how old she is. "They ask if I have kids or grandkids," Blakeley, 53, said. "They won't ask you your birth date, but they'll ask when you graduated from high school. " Blakeley has a rock-solid work ethic, good computer skills and an upbeat personality. What she doesn't have is a permanent job, despite trying her hardest to find one. It's a common story for people in their 50s, 60s and even 70s. Nearly 2 million people ages 55 and older are looking for a job these days, twice as many as before the Great Recession.
BUSINESS
October 30, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
Monthly Social Security payments will rise 1.5% next year, bringing the average benefit amount to about $1,288 after an annual cost-of-living adjustment, the Social Security Administration announced Wednesday. The 1.5% rise is the smallest increase since 2002 and is down from the 1.7% adjustment in 2012.  The annual cost-of-living adjustment is based on a consumer price index for urban wage earners and clerical workers. Inflation has remained low in recent years, underscored by the latest government data which showed that inflation in September was up just 1.2% from the year before.
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