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Ladd Mcintosh

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NEWS
May 13, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
The phone call came at 3 a.m. on a Thursday, and Ladd McIntosh was up, dressed and out of his North Hollywood house in 15 minutes. Then, crunched over a desk at the nearby home of his colleague, Bruce Fowler, the two men scribbled tiny black dots on musical manuscript paper, writing pieces for an orchestra. "We wrote nonstop for 10 hours," McIntosh recalls. "There were no breaks." Three times couriers arrived, taking McIntosh's and Fowler's finished work to a music copyist, and by 2 p.m.
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NEWS
May 13, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times.
The phone call came at 3 a.m. on a Thursday, and Ladd McIntosh was up, dressed and out of his North Hollywood house in 15 minutes. Then, crunched over a desk at the nearby home of his colleague, Bruce Fowler, the two men scribbled tiny black dots on musical manuscript paper, writing pieces for an orchestra. "We wrote nonstop for 10 hours," McIntosh recalls. "There were no breaks." Three times couriers arrived, taking McIntosh's and Fowler's finished work to a music copyist, and by 2 p.m.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ladd McIntosh leads a traditional modern jazz big band . . . sort of. During the opening set Wednesday at El Matador by the composer-arranger's 18-member ensemble, listeners heard moments of almost all jazz-related genres--including swing, funk, bossa nova, Latin, gospel, free-form and be-bop.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ladd McIntosh leads a traditional modern jazz big band . . . sort of. During the opening set Wednesday at El Matador by the composer-arranger's 18-member ensemble, listeners heard moments of almost all jazz-related genres--including swing, funk, bossa nova, Latin, gospel, free-form and be-bop.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1992
Of course state officials must face immediate and difficult issues caused by immigration, but "Calculating the Impact of California's Immigrants" is a much larger question than the headline promises. Today's immigrants 20 years from now will be the parents of a new, and probably larger, generation who will need more water, fresh air, jobs, highways, food and other necessities already in short supply for the homeless and many others.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Orange County jazz fans know Peggy Duquesnel for her strong keyboard work, heard often in these parts with the bands of saxophonist Wayne Wayne, guitarist Ric Flauding, or the group N'Color as well as during appearances under her own name. What's less known about the 31-year-old musician is that, in addition to being a fine keyboard technician and improviser, she's also a promising composer.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Monday was opening day for the Henry Mancini Institute's seventh annual summer program, and by midmorning the activities were ramping up to full speed. At UCLA's Schoenberg Hall, the HMI Orchestra members, freshly organized and feeling each other out musically, were reading through the music for tonight's opening concert. After lunch, the 84 young musicians, from 64 U.S.
NEWS
March 4, 1994 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Zan Stewart writes regularly about jazz for The Times
Through the years, jazz has blossomed at venues scattered all over Southern California. Beginning with the Cotton Club in Culver City in the '30s up to the Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood today, jazz greats and near-greats have played to packed rooms. One other clime has, for at least three decades, steadfastly offered listeners a wide variety of jazz entertainment--the San Fernando Valley.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1992
Of course state officials must face immediate and difficult issues caused by immigration, but "Calculating the Impact of California's Immigrants" is a much larger question than the headline promises. Today's immigrants 20 years from now will be the parents of a new, and probably larger, generation who will need more water, fresh air, jobs, highways, food and other necessities already in short supply for the homeless and many others.
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