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Lafayette Square

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REAL ESTATE
January 13, 1985
The first house and walking tour of Lafayette Square, a Los Angeles neighborhood of stately homes built from just before 1920 to the 1950s, will be held today from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., beginning at St. Charles Place and Wellington Road. Several homes designed by Paul Williams, one of the nation's most prominent architects and the first black member of the American Institute of Architects, will be on the tour, sponsored by the Los Angeles Conservancy and the Lafayette Square Homeowners Assn.
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NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - For more than 30 years, Concepcion Picciotto has held vigil outside the White House, protesting nuclear weapons and calling for peace. But Thursday morning, it appeared that her decades-long protest was finally over. U.S. Park Police removed her encampment - a tarp-covered umbrella and enormous hand-painted signs with messages like "Ban all nuclear weapons or have a nice doomsday" - before restoring it in the afternoon. Picciotto, a tiny and weather-worn 77-year-old, has maintained a steady presence in Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House, since 1981 - "in the snow, in the cold, in the heat," she said.
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NEWS
June 4, 1988 | Sam Hall Kaplan
From the turn of the century to the 1930s, most of Los Angeles' "hot properties" were located southwest of downtown in a collection of neighborhoods that now generally parallel the Santa Monica Freeway, from about Vermont to La Brea avenues. Perched on the graceful crescent of Alvarado Terrace, in the comfortable cluster of Chester Place, set back on well-landscaped lawns on Harvard Boulevard, behind walls on West Adams Boulevard, through the gates of Country Club Estates and lining St.
REAL ESTATE
February 9, 2003 | Allison B. Cohen, Special to The Times
The basics The community of 236 homes is bordered by Crenshaw, Venice, Washington and West boulevards. Although founded in 1913 by developer George Crenshaw, it is named after the French marquis who fought alongside Colonists in the American Revolution. Other than sharing his namesake, the neighborhood has no connection to Lafayette Park in the Westlake area near downtown Los Angeles. Calling card For a large house on a comparatively modest budget, Lafayette Square may be the answer.
NEWS
January 13, 1985 | GARY LIBMAN
In the years following World War I, clients often entered the new office of Los Angeles architect Paul Williams without realizing that he was black. After meeting Williams they would freeze and attempt to withdraw graciously. Williams was trying to breach an almost totally white profession, however, and he was ready with several tricks.
REAL ESTATE
February 9, 2003 | Allison B. Cohen, Special to The Times
The basics The community of 236 homes is bordered by Crenshaw, Venice, Washington and West boulevards. Although founded in 1913 by developer George Crenshaw, it is named after the French marquis who fought alongside Colonists in the American Revolution. Other than sharing his namesake, the neighborhood has no connection to Lafayette Park in the Westlake area near downtown Los Angeles. Calling card For a large house on a comparatively modest budget, Lafayette Square may be the answer.
REAL ESTATE
November 10, 1991 | MARILYN TOWER OLIVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Oliver is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
When architect David Shaw was a teen-ager, he would cut through Victoria Park Circle on his way to the pool at Los Angeles High School. He admired the stately homes built as a secluded community for the well-to-do of early Los Angeles between 1905 and 1910. In 1979, Shaw and his wife, Linda, bought a 1911 Prairie-style home reminiscent of the early designs of Frank Lloyd Wright.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, Mitchell Landsberg is a Times staff writer
Los Angeles can be a transient place. Everybody's moving from someplace to someplace else. Neighbors today, strangers tomorrow, and, hey, it was really nice knowing you. But this isn't about that. This is about Lafayette Square, one neighborhood--and there are others--where people stay, and sometimes their children stay, and sometimes their children's children stay after that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1989 | GINGER LYNNE THOMPSON, Times Staff Writer
Santos Rodriguez, a retired aerospace engineer, spends at least a day a week on the golf course with a few of his neighbors from Lafayette Square. They play in Whittier or Montebello, laughing, joking and discussing any issue that affects their lives and community--anything, that is, except for a plan to close off their streets, which has caused an undercurrent of tension even among chums.
SPORTS
May 7, 1989 | Associated Press
A shopping center developer and his son, both graduates of Notre Dame, will give the school one of the largest donations ever bestowed on an American university, the university announced. Developers Edward J. DeBartolo and Edward J. DeBartolo Jr. will donate $33 million for construction of a campus quadrangle that will include a classroom building and a performing arts center. "We hope that the thousands of students who follow us will benefit from the enhancement of the quality of educational opportunities at Notre Dame," said the elder DeBartolo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2001 | MITCHELL LANDSBERG, Mitchell Landsberg is a Times staff writer
Los Angeles can be a transient place. Everybody's moving from someplace to someplace else. Neighbors today, strangers tomorrow, and, hey, it was really nice knowing you. But this isn't about that. This is about Lafayette Square, one neighborhood--and there are others--where people stay, and sometimes their children stay, and sometimes their children's children stay after that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1996 | MAKI BECKER
After nearly a decade of preparation, restoration of the Felipe de Neve Public Library on the north side of Lafayette Park has begun. The library, built in 1929, has been closed since 1990 after building officials declared it unsafe. It has been replaced by a temporary storefront site at 610 S. Rampart Blvd. The $2.3-million library renovation was designed by Altoon and Porter Architects. The work will include seismic reinforcement and the addition of two pavilions.
REAL ESTATE
November 10, 1991 | MARILYN TOWER OLIVER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Oliver is a Los Angeles free-lance writer
When architect David Shaw was a teen-ager, he would cut through Victoria Park Circle on his way to the pool at Los Angeles High School. He admired the stately homes built as a secluded community for the well-to-do of early Los Angeles between 1905 and 1910. In 1979, Shaw and his wife, Linda, bought a 1911 Prairie-style home reminiscent of the early designs of Frank Lloyd Wright.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | ROBERT W. STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An anti-war group has complained that National Park Police officers roughed up demonstrators in Lafayette Park, across from the White House, as they beat drums and carried placards last Sunday to protest American involvement in the Persian Gulf War. In a letter to a congressional subcommittee responsible for the Park Police budget, the Washington Area Coalition to Stop U.S.
NEWS
December 16, 1989 | From Associated Press
The judge in the trial of a teen-ager accused of selling federal officials crack cocaine across the street from the White House called the government effort to show how easy it is to buy drugs a "Keystone Kops thing." First the alleged drug dealer didn't show up to make the sale in Lafayette Park, Drug Enforcement Administration special agent Sam Gaye testified. Next the undercover officer's body microphone malfunctioned.
NEWS
September 24, 1989 | RON RUSSELL, Times Staff Writer
It was charming, affordable, and only 10 minutes from her Beverly Hills office, but literary agent Nancy Nigrosh had something else in mind last year when she bought her two-story home in Lafayette Square. "I had faith that the community was going to be enclosed and that my house would be part of it," she said, referring to a plan, supported by a slim majority of homeowners, to close the south, east and west entrances to the area by blocking the ends of the streets to create cul-de-sacs.
NEWS
September 12, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff
WASHINGTON - For more than 30 years, Concepcion Picciotto has held vigil outside the White House, protesting nuclear weapons and calling for peace. But Thursday morning, it appeared that her decades-long protest was finally over. U.S. Park Police removed her encampment - a tarp-covered umbrella and enormous hand-painted signs with messages like "Ban all nuclear weapons or have a nice doomsday" - before restoring it in the afternoon. Picciotto, a tiny and weather-worn 77-year-old, has maintained a steady presence in Lafayette Square, across the street from the White House, since 1981 - "in the snow, in the cold, in the heat," she said.
NEWS
September 22, 1989
Federal agents had to manipulate a drug dealer into selling them crack cocaine in a park across from the White House so President Bush could show the drug on television and say that's where it came from, the Washington Post said in today's editions. The park, Lafayette Park, is not a usual drug market. The suspect, who still hasn't been arrested, already had sold crack to agents of the Drug Enforcement Administration elsewhere in Washington, the newspaper reported.
NEWS
September 23, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writers
President Bush acknowledged Friday that the government set up a drug purchase in a park across Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House to get a prop for his televised speech on the Administration's anti-drug strategy. "I think it was great," the President said, responding to questions about the sting operation. "It sent a message to the United States that, even across from the White House, they can sell drugs. It sends a powerful message to the American people."
NEWS
September 22, 1989
Federal agents had to manipulate a drug dealer into selling them crack cocaine in a park across from the White House so President Bush could show the drug on television and say that's where it came from, the Washington Post said in today's editions. The park, Lafayette Park, is not a usual drug market. The suspect, who still hasn't been arrested, already had sold crack to agents of the Drug Enforcement Administration elsewhere in Washington, the newspaper reported.
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