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Laguna Beach Ca Annexations

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
The city is studying the possibility of annexing of land north of its border that could bring in an additional $2.5 million annually in tax revenue. A $17,000 study on the annexation of North Laguna Hills, a community of about 4,000, was approved by the City Council this week. According to a 1990 study, the unincorporated north Laguna Hills area has a strong sales-tax base that would be expected to bring in at least $2.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1998 | LIZ SEYMOUR
Ten years after Laguna Beach annexed South Laguna, city officials have announced that the neighborhood will share the city's ZIP Code. Beginning July 1, South Laguna residents and businesses will no longer use 92677. Instead, the entire city will be served by 92651, a move that has drawn support from those who live and work south of Nyes Place. "It's been an annoyance and makes us feel like we're not part of Laguna," said Ron Harris, the president of the South Laguna Civic Assn. The U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST
In what could signal the end of a bitter legal battle over a proposed ocean-bluff development next to Laguna Beach, the City Council will meet Monday to reconsider annexing the 10-acre parcel known as Smithcliffs. The action comes on the heels of a meeting Friday, during which the property owner, city and county representatives and others agreed to recommend such an annexation, City Atty. Philip Kohn said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1995 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move they said foreshadowed their determination to "downsize" Orange County government, county supervisors tentatively agreed Tuesday to allow the city of Laguna Hills to annex property the county has been fighting to keep for years. Supervisor Marian Bergeson's proposal to make a 1.5-square-mile pocket of county land known as North Laguna Hills part of the city proper would relieve the county of the burden of providing services to the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two years after voting overwhelmingly to tax themselves to preserve open space in Laguna Canyon, a majority of Laguna Beach residents surveyed recently said they would again hike their taxes to keep local hillsides from being developed, according to poll results released by the city on Wednesday.
NEWS
October 8, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ and KRISTINA LINDGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After several days of intense negotiations and soul-searching, the Laguna Beach City Council voted unanimously Sunday to buy 2,150 acres in Laguna Canyon for $78 million and commit the city to an unprecedented land conservation plan that protects Southern California's last undeveloped coastal canyon. By agreeing to purchase the Laguna Laurel tract from the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The campaign manager for the Committee to Save the Canyon is taking nothing for granted these days. Never mind the informal telephone survey at the end of the week suggesting that two-thirds of Laguna Beach voters favor an upcoming $20-million bond measure, which, if passed, would go toward the $78-million purchase of Laguna Canyon land proposed for development by the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 7, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pending the approval of a revised city proposal by Donald L. Bren, the Irvine Co.'s chief executive officer, the City Council is expected to decide today whether to buy the company's land in environmentally sensitive Laguna Canyon. The council scheduled today's closed-door special session to consider a Laguna Laurel purchase agreement tentatively reached Saturday by representatives of the company and the city. Negotiators were expected to meet this morning before the council session.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1990 | MICHAEL FLAGG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that the dust has cleared in the fight over a scenic stretch of Laguna Canyon, how likely is the city of Laguna Beach to raise the nearly $80 million it needs to buy the property? The short answer: Financial experts say the city's plan to come up with the first $40 million seems pretty solid. It's the second half of the $80 million that's still up in the air. And one thing is clear--it will be a lot harder to get, experts say. Last week, the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | LESLIE HERZOG
To the relief of mobile home residents, planning officials have voted to create a new zoning ordinance that would restrict future development in Laguna Beach mobile home parks. Under the proposed ordinance, which must be approved by the City Council, existing mobile home parks would have to remain so and could not be developed for other purposes, such as hotels or private residences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST
After three years of wrangling and more than $100,000 in court costs, a reluctant City Council agreed Monday to a settlement that will allow the city to annex a 10-acre oceanfront parcel while relinquishing control over how the land will be developed. The property, known as Smithcliffs, is located just south of the Emerald Bay community and 26 homes will be built on the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST
In what could signal the end of a bitter legal battle over a proposed ocean-bluff development next to Laguna Beach, the City Council will meet Monday to reconsider annexing the 10-acre parcel known as Smithcliffs. The action comes on the heels of a meeting Friday, during which the property owner, city and county representatives and others agreed to recommend such an annexation, City Atty. Philip Kohn said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two years after voting overwhelmingly to tax themselves to preserve open space in Laguna Canyon, a majority of Laguna Beach residents surveyed recently said they would again hike their taxes to keep local hillsides from being developed, according to poll results released by the city on Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1992
The California Supreme Court has refused to hear an appeal from the city over the legality of controversial bootleg apartments, sometimes known as "granny flats." City officials had petitioned the court to strike down an appellate court's ruling that thwarted city attempts to crack down on the existence of second residential units in South Laguna.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1992 | FRANK MESSINA
The city is studying the possibility of annexing of land north of its border that could bring in an additional $2.5 million annually in tax revenue. A $17,000 study on the annexation of North Laguna Hills, a community of about 4,000, was approved by the City Council this week. According to a 1990 study, the unincorporated north Laguna Hills area has a strong sales-tax base that would be expected to bring in at least $2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not since August, 1971, when voters here approved new height restrictions on city buildings, has a local election drawn so much interest. And just as that earlier election was considered a milestone in the city's environmental movement, so is Tuesday's balloting in which voters will be asked to approve Measure H, a $20-million bond proposal aimed at preserving picturesque Laguna Canyon. Voter turnout is expected to be high, even by Laguna Beach standards.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1995 | RENE LYNCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move they said foreshadowed their determination to "downsize" Orange County government, county supervisors tentatively agreed Tuesday to allow the city of Laguna Hills to annex property the county has been fighting to keep for years. Supervisor Marian Bergeson's proposal to make a 1.5-square-mile pocket of county land known as North Laguna Hills part of the city proper would relieve the county of the burden of providing services to the area.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
A Superior Court judge Wednesday let stand Laguna Beach's crackdown on bootleg apartments, a decision which could affect up to 600 residents in one of the most bitter fights in the city's history. Judge William F. McDonald partially rejected a class-action lawsuit which alleged that the city illegally tried to eliminate South Laguna's bootleg apartments. Those apartments had proliferated under more relaxed county standards before the area was annexed to Laguna Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The campaign manager for the Committee to Save the Canyon is taking nothing for granted these days. Never mind the informal telephone survey at the end of the week suggesting that two-thirds of Laguna Beach voters favor an upcoming $20-million bond measure, which, if passed, would go toward the $78-million purchase of Laguna Canyon land proposed for development by the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, Times Staff Writer
Q: What is the city of Laguna Beach buying? A: The Laguna Beach City Council has agreed to purchase from the Irvine Co. 2,150 acres of Laguna Canyon land for $78 million, effectively halting the company's plans to build a 3,200-unit development on the untouched countryside. The land is located between the city of Irvine, the residential community of Leisure World and the city of Laguna Beach. Q: Why do Laguna Beach officials and some environmentalists feel it is important to buy the land?
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