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Laguna Beach Ca Government Employees Layoffs

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
After months of grim fiscal forecasts, the City Council will hold a hearing tonight focusing almost exclusively on the budget. While tax hikes are mentioned as an alternative, the city staff is not recommending any increases at this time. A previous council discussion about whether to boost taxes on such things as movie and festival admissions or to impose a special tax for police and fire services brought a wave of public protest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
After months of grim fiscal forecasts, the City Council will hold a hearing tonight focusing almost exclusively on the budget. While tax hikes are mentioned as an alternative, the city staff is not recommending any increases at this time. A previous council discussion about whether to boost taxes on such things as movie and festival admissions or to impose a special tax for police and fire services brought a wave of public protest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
In a bleak assessment of the budget woes Laguna Beach must face in coming months, City Manager Kenneth C. Frank said 15 city employees will probably lose their jobs in the next fiscal year unless the city revises its spending plans and raises taxes. To avert the layoffs, the city would have to use money currently pledged to buy open space and to build a downtown parking garage, Frank said. It would also have to raise taxes on utilities, cable television and telephone use, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
In a bleak assessment of the budget woes Laguna Beach must face in coming months, City Manager Kenneth C. Frank said 15 city employees will probably lose their jobs in the next fiscal year unless the city revises its spending plans and raises taxes. To avert the layoffs, the city would have to use money currently pledged to buy open space and to build a downtown parking garage, Frank said. It would also have to raise taxes on utilities, cable television and telephone use, he said.
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