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Laguna Beach Ca Landmarks

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
The aging lifeguard tower at Main Beach may be the most photographed public building in Laguna Beach. Both quaint and functional, the hexagon-shaped structure is one of this community's treasures, residents say. "It's a landmark," said Mike Dwinell, the city's head lifeguard. "It's been the subject of many postcards and many paintings." The landmark was once part of a gas station at Broadway and Coast Highway. In the 1920s, horse power was used to move the structure to the beach, Dwinell said.
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NEWS
February 24, 1998 | CATHY CURTIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Famous as a funky, bohemian outpost of eclectic old bungalows and meandering streets, Laguna Beach would never be mistaken for a rule-bound planned community. Yet maintaining the rakishly independent charm of this city of 24,416 involves a strict historic preservation ordinance and a long list of picky codes and guidelines. It also involves an unusually inclusive public process that has become more impassioned in recent years as '90s notions of the good life clash with Laguna's simpler past.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1992 | LESLIE BERKMAN
After months of dickering with plans, the city's Design Review Board has unanimously approved a proposal to build a three-bedroom home carved within a landmark rock formation near Aliso Pier. "It's hard to believe. It is just sinking in," said Ed Bowler, a 44-year-old El Cajon dentist whose family has been struggling to get the home built since his father bought the property 23 years ago with the idea of retiring there. "It was going to be his dream home," Bowler said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a graphic illustration of what can happen when art, politics and economics collide, it took just a few fast brush strokes Wednesday to destroy what a painter had created and given to the world. The famous "Whaling Wall" of Laguna Beach artist Robert Wyland is no more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1990 | LESLIE HERZOG
Humphrey Bogart, Errol Flynn and Charles A. Lindbergh are among the luminaries who dined and drank there while gazing at picture-perfect ocean sunsets. The guest book bears the signatures of Myrna Loy, Faye Wray and Prince Theodore of Russia. The Hotel Laguna, the city's most significant historical landmark, celebrates its 60th anniversary this year. The distinctive, Spanish-style building has enjoyed a colorful past that has been documented by its current owners, Claes and Georgia Andersen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
Once listed by the Guinness Book of World Records as the planet's smallest cathedral, St. Francis by-the-Sea American Catholic Church in Laguna Beach will again bask in the spotlight Saturday when it is publicly dedicated as a national landmark. The diminutive cathedral was built with rubble from the Long Beach earthquake in 1933 in the shadow of the imposing St. Mary's Episcopal Church on Park Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
In a decision that overturns a design review board ruling, the City Council voted Tuesday to allow well-known artist Wyland to paint a mural at an art gallery now under construction near the landmark "Whaling Wall." Wyland had sought permission in July to paint an ocean-themed mural on the gallery property, which he owns, because the "Whaling Wall," the first in a series of seascapes by the artist, will soon be painted over as part an expansion of the Hotel Laguna.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 1989 | LUCILLE RENWICK, Times Staff Writer
The thick ivy that draped the roof of the Ivy House Restaurant for 70 years is gone, replaced by new cedar shingles. The inside is bare, except for a new oak and marble bar that awaits the old haunt's return to life. The Ivy House, which got its name from the 16-inch-thick ivy that covered several windows, was a Laguna Beach landmark, not only for its architecture but for its clientele. Since 1975, the Ivy House had been a second home for local artists, cartoonists, performers and writers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a graphic illustration of what can happen when art, politics and economics collide, it took just a few fast brush strokes Wednesday to destroy what a painter had created and given to the world. The famous "Whaling Wall" by artist Robert Wyland is no more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a graphic illustration of what can happen when art, politics and economics collide, it took just a few fast brush strokes Wednesday to destroy what a painter had created and given to the world. The famous "Whaling Wall" of Laguna Beach artist Robert Wyland is no more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1996 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a graphic illustration of what can happen when art, politics and economics collide, it took just a few fast brush strokes Wednesday to destroy what a painter had created and given to the world. The famous "Whaling Wall" by artist Robert Wyland is no more.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1996 | KIMBERLY BROWER
In a decision that overturns a design review board ruling, the City Council voted Tuesday to allow well-known artist Wyland to paint a mural at an art gallery now under construction near the landmark "Whaling Wall." Wyland had sought permission in July to paint an ocean-themed mural on the gallery property, which he owns, because the "Whaling Wall," the first in a series of seascapes by the artist, will soon be painted over as part an expansion of the Hotel Laguna.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
La Casa Del Camino sits at the edge of the ocean, a faded beauty on the brink of revival. Even now--with its interior framing exposed and antique furnishings bathed in dust--the place reeks of romance. The hotel's glory days had come and gone before Dilesh Patel, 25, was even born. But since moving from London to Laguna Niguel a year ago, Patel has made it his goal to unearth the charm of this Mediterranean-style edifice, built in 1928 by artist and former City Councilman William Riddle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In an odd little dispute even for a city known as an eccentric artists' colony, a property owner and the artist called Wyland are squabbling over whales painted on the wall of a hotel parking lot. The "Whaling Wall" mural has become a landmark since Wyland painted it 15 years ago, launching a career that has generated 67 such scenes across the nation and in other countries, making Wyland a millionaire in the process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It belongs to a bygone era, when managers in suits greeted moviegoers at the door, and ushers in uniforms guided them down the aisles. Edwards South Coast Laguna is an aging landmark that opened 60 years ago this summer with a Jane Withers movie, a Mickey Mouse cartoon and a line around the corner. Still this city's only movie theater, it also is the subject of a tug-of-war between those who consider it a historical treasure and want it restored, and those who want it modernized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1995 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As workers in Huntington Beach recently began dismantling a World War II bunker in Bolsa Chica, officials at Crystal Cove State Park began planning to preserve some of the history being lost to the battering ram. A smaller bunker built into the hillside overlooking Abalone Point to spot and locate enemy ships will be made into an attraction for people interested in the history surrounding the defense of the coastline during the war, they said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1989
The Laguna Beach City Council has moved to put part of an old sewage treatment plant, called a "concrete toilet" by one council member, on the city's historic register. Council members voted unanimously Tuesday night to preserve the plant's cylinder and office portions and place them, along with City Hall and the central fire station, on the register. The cylinder, used to vent the old sewage plant, is a lighthouse-shaped structure on the hillside above Laguna Canyon Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
Property owners with structures considered to be of excellent historical value may have the opportunity to reduce their property taxes in exchange for agreeing to preserve the "historic integrity" of the buildings. Under a program approved by the City Council last week, residents can take advantage of benefits based on the Mills Act adopted by the state Legislature in 1976. The program allows the city to enter into a 10-year contract with people who own property that the city wants to preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
Property owners with structures considered to be of excellent historical value may have the opportunity to reduce their property taxes in exchange for agreeing to preserve the "historic integrity" of the buildings. Under a program approved by the City Council last week, residents can take advantage of benefits based on the Mills Act adopted by the state Legislature in 1976. The program allows the city to enter into a 10-year contract with people who own property that the city wants to preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
The aging lifeguard tower at Main Beach may be the most photographed public building in Laguna Beach. Both quaint and functional, the hexagon-shaped structure is one of this community's treasures, residents say. "It's a landmark," said Mike Dwinell, the city's head lifeguard. "It's been the subject of many postcards and many paintings." The landmark was once part of a gas station at Broadway and Coast Highway. In the 1920s, horse power was used to move the structure to the beach, Dwinell said.
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