Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLaguna Beach Ca Public Works
IN THE NEWS

Laguna Beach Ca Public Works

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
When she first got the call that a sidewalk was moving at a downtown park, Deputy City Clerk Roe Allen said that she didn't know what to think. But the unidentified woman was adamant. "She said she wanted to report the sidewalk was moving at Heisler Park near the bowling green and that we better get somebody out there right away to look at it," Allen said. The Friday caller insisted that she could actually see the pathway shift.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The seaside enclave of Laguna Beach has long been a catch basin for inland urban runoff and flood waters, which in years past have washed through its narrow village streets and swamped its business district and beaches.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 23, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The City Council recently approved a seven-year capital improvement program for street maintenance and repairs. Approval was necessary to apply for $240,000 in Measure M funds, the countywide sales tax approved by voters in 1990 to fund transportation improvements. The council will spend the money on resurfacing projects, beginning with Hillcrest Drive, Temple Hills Drive, Alta Vista Way and Terry Road next year. Information: (949) 497-0750.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 2000 | Sharon Nagy, (949) 248-2168
Construction workers are installing a new storm drain on Circle Way, north of the stairs in Crescent Bay, to take drainage away from North Coast Highway. The $212,000 project is expected to be completed in December. Representatives from Cedro Construction, which the city is contracting with, will be going door to door to talk with residents who live near the project to lessen concerns, city officials said. (949) 497-0792.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1999 | TRICIA SCHWENNESEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Measures to shore up the hillside site of Laguna Beach's new reservoir appear adequate to stabilize the slope through the rainy season, consultants told the City Council on Tuesday. "Everything they're doing is going to be effective on every square foot up there," said Michael Harding of Great Circle International, one of two San Diego-based firms hired to review the project's erosion control and site stability plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000 | SHARON NAGY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Laguna Beach firetrucks will now respond to every sewage spill, officials have decided, after a rash of criticism from environmentalists who charged the city had a poor response time to such disasters. Firefighters will cordon off spilled sewage until other city staff can begin disinfecting the area. They may also put an absorbent material, like sand, on waste water to stop it from spreading. "It can take up to 20 minutes for our guys to get to the scene," said Steve May, city engineer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
Parts of Ocean Avenue will be closed at times in January while the city installs a new sewer line. The work, scheduled to begin Tuesday, is necessary to replace a deteriorated sewer line on the north side of Ocean Avenue near South Coast Highway. The new sewer line will be connected to an existing line near Ocean and Forest avenues, according to city officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST
The repair of a ruptured pipe that is dumping treated sewage near the shoreline is taking longer than anticipated and could keep Aliso Beach closed until at least Monday. The pipe apparently fractured during a storm in February and has since been dumping thousands of gallons of treated sewage into the ocean daily. Water officials had hoped to have the pipe repaired by late last week, allowing the beach to reopen shortly thereafter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1992 | LEN HALL
Aliso Beach remained closed indefinitely while workers for the Aliso Water Management Agency renewed efforts today to repair a leaky sewer outfall pipe near the Aliso Pier. The leak, about 100 feet from shore in about 10 feet of water, is discharging about 100,000 gallons of treated sewage each day, said Lisa Hogan, assistant general manager of the agency, an affiliation of seven water and sewer districts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A bitter, seven-year battle over development in a rural Laguna Beach community has culminated with a judge's ruling that the city pay all costs--which could reach $2.7 million--for new roads in the area. Orange County Superior Court Judge David H. Brickner ruled that the city must build and pay for new streets in the Diamond-Crestview neighborhood, which ultimately could accommodate up to 100 new homes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2000 | SHARON NAGY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Laguna Beach firetrucks will now respond to every sewage spill, officials have decided, after a rash of criticism from environmentalists who charged the city had a poor response time to such disasters. Firefighters will cordon off spilled sewage until other city staff can begin disinfecting the area. They may also put an absorbent material, like sand, on waste water to stop it from spreading. "It can take up to 20 minutes for our guys to get to the scene," said Steve May, city engineer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2000 | HECTOR BECERRA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Beach and the Moulton Niguel Water District could each be fined thousands of dollars for leaks this year that allowed raw sewage to flow into the ocean, water quality officials say. On Feb. 27 and March 5, a total of 12,000 gallons of sewage from Laguna Beach city lines spilled into storm drains and flowed to the ocean, forcing closure of some stretches of beach, officials with the San Diego Regional Water Quality Control Board said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1999 | TRICIA SCHWENNESEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Measures to shore up the hillside site of Laguna Beach's new reservoir appear adequate to stabilize the slope through the rainy season, consultants told the City Council on Tuesday. "Everything they're doing is going to be effective on every square foot up there," said Michael Harding of Great Circle International, one of two San Diego-based firms hired to review the project's erosion control and site stability plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1999 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The view from Beverly Longfield's balcony is breathtaking. To the right of her Laguna Beach home, the sparkling Pacific Ocean beckons. But to the left, where there was once a lush, green hillside, there is now just a mound of earth, shaved clean of all vegetation. The grading was supposed to be finished months ago as part of a plan to build a 5-million-gallon reservoir that would protect against a repeat of the devastating 1993 firestorm that gutted portions of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 24, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The City Council voted this week to fund a review of erosion protection plans for grading work for an access road to the North Laguna Reservoir project. The grading for the access road to the 5-million-gallon emergency supply reservoir has yet to be completed and neighboring residents fear that winter rains will result in landslide conditions. However, Laguna Beach Water District officials have put the work on hold until spring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the decision a day away, it was uncertain Monday how the City Council would vote tonight on a proposed reservoir that has become increasingly controversial since the terrible fire three weeks ago. Councilman Wayne L. Peterson has urged the council to approve an agreement allowing the Laguna Beach Water District to build a 3-million-gallon reservoir at one of the highest points in the city. Peterson has argued that the reservoir would have significantly helped firefighters Oct.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|