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Laguna Beach Ca Reconstruction

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN
Sunshine gave a boost Tuesday to the kickoff of efforts to reseed fire-scorched hillsides in Laguna Beach. "It is nice and dry and the sun is shining, which is good for the native plants," said Michael Harding, an erosion control specialist for Woodward-Clyde, a Santa Ana company hired as the city's consultant. Light rain Monday night, he said, added just the right amount of moisture to help new seeds take hold.
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NEWS
April 11, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun slipped slowly into the Pacific as a loose knot of people stood in the middle of their desolate street last week, ticking off the names of the neighbors who once lived among them. The Carys? Gone. The Williamsons? History. Jim and Rob? Gone, too. So was Joe, who had decided not to rebuild a month or so back. "It's just terrible," lamented Jackie Allen, standing on Buena Vista Way with her husband, Jim, and neighbor Thomas Homan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Nearly two years since walls of flame roared through the city and torched hundreds of homes, many fire victims who have rebuilt their houses are unhappy about the haunting and eerie ruins that still surround them. In places, chimneys reach up like tombstones in memory of the October, 1993, firestorm. Dead trees stand, bony and burned. Rubble litters empty lots where homes once stood. "It still looks like a cemetery," Dick Baxter said while workers painted his new Caribbean Way home.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sun slipped slowly into the Pacific as a loose knot of people stood in the middle of their desolate street last week, ticking off the names of the neighbors who once lived among them. The Carys? one asked. Gone. The Williamsons? History. Jim and Rob? Gone too. And so was Joe, who had decided a month or so back not to rebuild. "It's just terrible," lamented Jackie Allen, standing on Buena Vista Way with her husband, Jim, and neighbor Thomas Homan.
NEWS
October 31, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jackie Allen tries hard to focus on the future, imagining a time, perhaps late next year, when she will be home. She will entertain guests again, something she has not felt able to do since the flames consumed her home and eight others on Buena Vista Way. She will stop feeling jumpy at the slightest provocation. And she will look out her window at the return of her neighborhood. "This next year, everything's going to be moving," Allen said, a note of determination creeping into her voice.
NEWS
September 22, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last spring, as their neighbors pondered whether to rebuild their fire-ravaged homes on Buena Vista Way, two families decided to move elsewhere in the hope of speeding their recoveries from the devastating blaze. After all, the city had promised to expedite the reconstruction efforts of all fire victims.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With a picture perfect day for a backdrop, dozens of well-wishers gathered at 838 Manzanita Drive on Wednesday to celebrate the completion of the first house to be rebuilt since last fall's firestorm. Flanked by television crews and encouraged by old friends, owner Louise Benton and tenant Patricia Powers labored to describe their feelings. "They're mixed," said Powers, who will move back into the house next weekend. "It's like I'm the only one.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
During 22 years of living in the peaceful hills above this city's downtown, Christian Werner had never learned the name of a single neighbor on Buena Vista Way--a quiet, winding street lined with hedges and high walls that provided the privacy he cherished.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1993 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An American Indian with long black hair blessed the four corners of Main Beach with incense and an eagle feather on Saturday. A group of Hare Krishnas played drums and chanted a song. And the Supreme Master Ching Hai, a spiritual leader from Taiwan, distributed candy to children, gave discourses on life to anyone willing to listen and served vegetarian Vietnamese meals to a crowd of about 500 people. "It hasn't felt this relaxing here since the fire," said Holly Shulman, a three-year resident.
NEWS
March 14, 1994 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They live on streets where houses have vanished, children no longer play and a walk down the block is a heartbreaking journey. In the four months since a capricious firestorm spared their homes while annihilating their neighborhoods, these surviving families have been trapped in a nightmare world with a warped and eerie landscape. They feel sad, lonely and guilty. And they apologize for complaining.
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