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Laguna Beach Ca Reconstruction

NEWS
June 12, 1994 | REBECCA TROUNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside the meeting room, Jim Allen listened quietly, his face expressionless, a loyal neighbor at his side, as this city's oft-maligned Design Review Board all but assured him he could go forward with plans to rebuild on his fire-ravaged lot. Once outside, however, the 63-year-old Allen released the breath he had seemed to be holding throughout the hearing and broke into a grin that left his ruddy face aglow.
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NEWS
October 24, 1994 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the city grapples with rebuilding a year after the disastrous firestorm that consumed some 400 homes, it can count one stroke of fortune: Homeowners have fared better with the insurance industry than other scorched Southland communities have. State regulators and many of the city's fire victims give reasonably good marks to insurers, who have processed nearly 2,600 claims totaling more than $350 million in the aftermath of the Laguna blaze.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | FRANK MESSINA
Residents whose houses burned down or were seriously damaged in the recent fire can see a possible vision of their new home at a collection of architectural drawings at the Laguna Art Museum. About 50 Southern California architectural firms are represented at the museum, which is granting free admission to the show. Museum officials said they wanted to give fire survivors a stress-free environment to look over samples of architectural work.
NEWS
October 22, 1996 | NANCY CLEELAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
News of Monday's firestorm in Lemon Heights brought back painful memories to Sheila Patterson. Her heart went out to those who lost their homes. "These poor people are going to be in for quite an adventure," said Patterson, whose own home burned to the ground in the 1993 Laguna Beach blaze. "At first, they'll be in shock. But soon enough they're going to realize how really bad it is. People have no idea."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
The American Red Cross, which sent more than 1,200 volunteers to Laguna Beach to help victims of the recent fire, has been swamped with calls from people who want to learn how they can help. More than 1,500 people have offered to aid the Red Cross since the Oct. 27 wildfires, said spokeswoman Kara Lakkees. "But there's a misconception that you can just show up at a volunteer center and start working," Lakkees said. "We prefer to have our volunteers trained."
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Business leaders, vowing to make the community even better than it was before the fire, announced a campaign Tuesday to help local agencies replant scorched hillsides to restore Laguna Beach's scenic beauty. Another main goal of the Laguna Beach Chamber of Commerce's "The Greening of Laguna" campaign is to let people throughout the country know that business and tourist destinations are open as usual, chamber President Joe Orsak said.
NEWS
November 3, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST and MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the first public gathering of its besieged City Council since a wicked wildfire consumed 360 homes, a hurt and divided community Tuesday night alternately clashed with city leaders and urged that everyone pull together toward a speedy recovery. Both raucous and somber, the 4 1/2-hour meeting crystallized a range of feelings from the past six days since a fire swept through Laguna Canyon, changing lives and landscapes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Deft and persistent, insurance adjusters, contractors, handymen and con artists have descended upon this blackened and battered community with a pressing urgency that puts even the media to shame. The problem worsened this week when someone duplicated and distributed police passes that allowed residents, the press and "bona fide" workers into burned-out neighborhoods, Police Chief Neil J. Purcell Jr. said. With a fake permit for a ticket, a stream of less scrupulous types slipped in as well.
NEWS
October 26, 1994 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For 18 years, Michael and Lynn Lindsey cherished their lives in Canyon Acres, a tiny, cockeyed community known for its rustic old houses, breezy ambience and laid-back residents, many of them artists. Their days were brightened by simple pleasures and gentle surprises: a peacock napping on a chicken coop, chickens roosting in the apricot tree and neighbors chatting around a fire pit after sundown. To many, this jerry-built enclave was "old Laguna," a haven for free spirits.
NEWS
October 29, 1993 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kicking through the charred debris of what used to be his living room, Michael Orchowski uncovered a china teacup. It was perfect. "This used to be a beautiful set," he lamented. Orchowski's was one of 150 homes that caught fire on Skyline Drive, a meandering roadway that cuts across a picturesque hillside overlooking downtown Laguna Beach and the Pacific Ocean.
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