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Laguna Beach Dog Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993
On the very first morning of my home delivery, I was treated to that wonderful picture of the Laguna Beach Dog Park with a plea for same in San Clemente ("San Clemente Needs a Dog Park," Dec. 19). If ever a picture spoke a thousand words, that one did; you could almost feel the joyous spirit of those fortunate pets, running and romping as nature intended. As a pet owner of three, I can attest to the beneficial effects of playtime with those "other" members of our families.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1993
On the very first morning of my home delivery, I was treated to that wonderful picture of the Laguna Beach Dog Park with a plea for same in San Clemente ("San Clemente Needs a Dog Park," Dec. 19). If ever a picture spoke a thousand words, that one did; you could almost feel the joyous spirit of those fortunate pets, running and romping as nature intended. As a pet owner of three, I can attest to the beneficial effects of playtime with those "other" members of our families.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1992 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came in all sizes, colors and breeds for the grand opening of the Laguna Beach Dog Park. Balloons and signs announced the opening, and like other dedications, there were speeches. But then 30 dogs were turned loose in the two-acre grassy field along Laguna Canyon Road. For many of them, it was their first time to run leashless, romp and play with other dogs without having a human in tow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
Every day, before her master can even finish reading the newspaper, Julie starts getting antsy about going to "Bark Park." The 2-year-old Rottweiler is one of hundreds of dogs who count on an unleashed romp at the county's only canine park as part of their regular routine. "She asks to go every day," Julie's owner, Carole Noia of Laguna Beach, said. "We have to spell 'BP.' You can't even say 'Bark Park' because they know what that is."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
Every day, before her master can even finish reading the newspaper, Julie starts getting antsy about going to "Bark Park." The 2-year-old Rottweiler is one of hundreds of dogs who count on an unleashed romp at the county's only canine park as part of their regular routine. "She asks to go every day," Julie's owner, Carole Noia of Laguna Beach, said. "We have to spell 'BP.' You can't even say 'Bark Park' because they know what that is."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1995 | DEBRA CANO
Norm and Carol Lovett are eagerly awaiting the day when their two Australian shepherds, Samantha and Brandy, can run free in Huntington Central Park. That day won't come until dog owners raise the rest of the $2,500 needed to fence in an undeveloped area of the park where dogs would be allowed off their leashes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1994 | LYNN FRANEY
After hearing from vocal dog lovers who support a dog park, the city's Parks and Recreation Commission has given preliminary approval for a recreation area for pets. The commissioners on Monday suggested cutting some amenities, such as drinking fountains, a wrought-iron fence, trees and some benches, to reduce the original $90,000 cost estimate by more than $20,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1993 | WILLSON CUMMER
Thousands of dogs would run free in their own park under a Community Services Department proposal expected tonight at the City Council meeting. Many residents have complained about feces and unleashed dogs in the city's 26 parks, said Park Supt. David J. Alkema, and the proposed solution is a three-acre fenced area in the southeast part of TeWinkle Park, where dogs could run off-leash. Plastic "mutt mitts" would be provided to help owners clean up after their animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2010 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to The Los Angeles Times
You've probably seen a panel or two of Brad Anderson's "Marmaduke" comic strip at some point in your life. And, chances are, if you ever put a voice to the comic's Great Dane, it sounded something like Scooby Doo ("Ruh-roh, Raggy!") because these dogs must all sound alike, right? So when the movie version of "Marmaduke" begins and the overgrown title character opens his mouth and we hear Owen Wilson's Texas drawl, there's an odd disconnect. It doesn't sound right. And it's kind of fun. For about five minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trendy restaurants are commonplace in Laguna Beach, but some say the liveliest social stir is being created these days on a two-acre strip of grass along Laguna Canyon Road known as the "Bark Park." Two months after opening, the county's only park exclusively for dogs is attracting animal lovers and their pets from as far away as Beverly Hills, with as many as 75 dog owners sometimes converging on the park at one time. "It's just a phenomenal success," Cindy King, city recreation director, said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1992 | GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came in all sizes, colors and breeds for the grand opening of the Laguna Beach Dog Park. Balloons and signs announced the opening, and like other dedications, there were speeches. But then 30 dogs were turned loose in the two-acre grassy field along Laguna Canyon Road. For many of them, it was their first time to run leashless, romp and play with other dogs without having a human in tow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 2000 | DANA BUSHEE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're fittingly tagged Bark Park, Pooch Park, Best Friends Park and Central Bark in cities across Orange County. And these fenced patches of land catering to canines and their owners have become so popular that five more communities are starting them. "As many cities that can find a spot to build a dog park would certainly help us," said Ken Montgomery, director of public works for Laguna Niguel, which opened Pooch Park three years ago.
NEWS
July 18, 1995 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Expecting guests this summer? Want to give them a slice of Orange County that maybe even you haven't tasted before? Here are some tidbits you might offer--or perhaps keep for yourself: Orange County? Sure, your guests might wonder about the name. Tell them that in the years B.D. (Before Developers), Orange County was covered not by red-tiled roofs but by orange groves. More than 60,000 acres, in fact. It wasn't that long ago that you'd walk outside at night and smell orange blossoms in the air.
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