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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Yanez has been designing signs in Laguna Beach for more than 30 years. Being an artist isn't enough these days, however. He has to be a diplomat and politician as well. "It's very restrictive," said Yanez, proprietor of the Roman Sign Studio on Laguna Canyon Road.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by struggling painters in Laguna Beach to sell their artwork in parks and other public spaces has been dealt a blow by a federal judge in a free-speech case being watched by artists across the state. The decision comes as plein-air painters in art-oriented cities like Laguna Beach, Carmel and Santa Monica have been pushing for the right to sell their art in public, saying they can't afford the skyrocketing prices of renting gallery space.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1988
In the not-so-best of worlds, laws are made and enforced that respond more to the cries of "there oughta be a law" rather than a need to protect our rights. The outdoor display ordinance in Laguna Beach is an example. Someone said, "I don't like outdoor displays. They're tacky. There oughta be a law." And some lawmakers responded. The result is a law that does not protect individual rights, but rather restricts and abridges those rights, limiting the individual's private property rights, right to made a living, and freedom of expression.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2000 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Roman Yanez has been designing signs in Laguna Beach for more than 30 years. Being an artist isn't enough these days, however. He has to be a diplomat and politician as well. "It's very restrictive," said Yanez, proprietor of the Roman Sign Studio on Laguna Canyon Road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | LESLIE HERZOG
To the relief of mobile home residents, planning officials have voted to create a new zoning ordinance that would restrict future development in Laguna Beach mobile home parks. Under the proposed ordinance, which must be approved by the City Council, existing mobile home parks would have to remain so and could not be developed for other purposes, such as hotels or private residences.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Orange County's first "domestic partnerships" ordinance, a city law that grants unmarried couples some of the same rights as husbands and wives, has received preliminary approval from the City Council. The law is designed to give partners such privileges as visiting their companions in the hospital or making funeral arrangements for a loved one. The bill was proposed by Mayor Robert F. Gentry, whose companion of 15 years died of AIDS in 1989.
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Orange County's first law to grant gay and lesbian couples some of the same rights enjoyed by husbands and wives won final approval from the City Council on Tuesday. The "domestic partnerships" ordinance was unanimously endorsed after an emotional, half-hour hearing. Only two people testified against the measure. Both objected to the city's assertion that the law addresses the changing nature of the American family. But the measure's passage brought a loud, sustained applause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While a judge further explores whether the city's police motorcycles are painted the wrong color, officers can continue writing traffic tickets without fear that the citations will be tossed out of court, Police Chief Neil J. Purcell Jr. said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2001 | CHRISTINE HANLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by struggling painters in Laguna Beach to sell their artwork in parks and other public spaces has been dealt a blow by a federal judge in a free-speech case being watched by artists across the state. The decision comes as plein-air painters in art-oriented cities like Laguna Beach, Carmel and Santa Monica have been pushing for the right to sell their art in public, saying they can't afford the skyrocketing prices of renting gallery space.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Motorists challenging the color of authority have flooded the Police Department with calls, seeking dismissal of their traffic tickets because the city picked the wrong hues for its two-tone motorcycles. "I've been in this business 31 years, and I'm not naive enough not to know I'm going to get a surprise once in a while," Police Chief Neil J. Purcell Jr. said. "But this comes as a surprise."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever walked down the beach, tripped over a hole someone had left in the sand and muttered, "There oughta be a law"? Now there is. In an attempt mostly to give lifeguards more authority to curb public behavior on crowded beach days, the Laguna Beach City Council has formally banned such time-honored ocean-side practices as digging deep holes in the sand, tossing flying disks and staking out turf with large umbrellas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While a judge further explores whether the city's police motorcycles are painted the wrong color, officers can continue writing traffic tickets without fear that the citations will be tossed out of court, Police Chief Neil J. Purcell Jr. said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1992 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Motorists challenging the color of authority have flooded the Police Department with calls, seeking dismissal of their traffic tickets because the city picked the wrong hues for its two-tone motorcycles. "I've been in this business 31 years, and I'm not naive enough not to know I'm going to get a surprise once in a while," Police Chief Neil J. Purcell Jr. said. "But this comes as a surprise."
NEWS
April 22, 1992 | From a Times Staff Writer
Orange County's first law to grant gay and lesbian couples some of the same rights enjoyed by husbands and wives won final approval from the City Council on Tuesday. The "domestic partnerships" ordinance was unanimously endorsed after an emotional, half-hour hearing. Only two people testified against the measure. Both objected to the city's assertion that the law addresses the changing nature of the American family. But the measure's passage brought a loud, sustained applause.
NEWS
April 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Orange County's first "domestic partnerships" ordinance, a city law that grants unmarried couples some of the same rights as husbands and wives, has received preliminary approval from the City Council. The law is designed to give partners such privileges as visiting their companions in the hospital or making funeral arrangements for a loved one. The bill was proposed by Mayor Robert F. Gentry, whose companion of 15 years died of AIDS in 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1989 | LESLIE HERZOG
To the relief of mobile home residents, planning officials have voted to create a new zoning ordinance that would restrict future development in Laguna Beach mobile home parks. Under the proposed ordinance, which must be approved by the City Council, existing mobile home parks would have to remain so and could not be developed for other purposes, such as hotels or private residences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever walked down the beach, tripped over a hole someone had left in the sand and muttered, "There oughta be a law"? Now there is. In an attempt mostly to give lifeguards more authority to curb public behavior on crowded beach days, the Laguna Beach City Council has formally banned such time-honored ocean-side practices as digging deep holes in the sand, tossing flying disks and staking out turf with large umbrellas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1990 | LINDA NATALI
Ellen Margetich dreads Saturday mornings. She used to look forward to spending the day gardening in her back yard or relaxing at the pool, but not anymore. "Basically you are trapped in your home by leaf blowers," Margetich said in an appearance before the City Council this week. "The fumes and noise are unbearable." Margetich, who lives on Culebra Street, told the council that a virtual army of gardeners toting leaf blowers descends on her block about 9 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1988
In the not-so-best of worlds, laws are made and enforced that respond more to the cries of "there oughta be a law" rather than a need to protect our rights. The outdoor display ordinance in Laguna Beach is an example. Someone said, "I don't like outdoor displays. They're tacky. There oughta be a law." And some lawmakers responded. The result is a law that does not protect individual rights, but rather restricts and abridges those rights, limiting the individual's private property rights, right to made a living, and freedom of expression.
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