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Laguna Beach School District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The Laguna Beach School District has two new principals. In August, Joanne Culverhouse takes over as principal at El Morro Elementary School. Beginning this month, Stuart Simms replaces Barbara Collard as principal of Laguna Beach High School. Supt. Theresa Daem introduced the two administrators at a recent school board meeting, where she also presented a certificate of appreciation to District Executive Secretary Nancy Vaughan.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 2000 | SEEMA MEHTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An upscale housing construction site is not the only source of illegal discharges into the fragile marine ecosystem off Crystal Cove State Park, a regional water agency's staff said Tuesday--an elementary school, a road and historic cottages also are culprits. The staff of the Santa Ana Regional Water Quality Control Board recommended that the board issue a cease-and-desist order against the Irvine Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1992
There is a pressing problem among the schools in the Capistrano Unified School District because of the unfair distribution of state funds within Orange County. The Capistrano Unified School District ranks last in per pupil expenditures in Orange County, behind 11 other school districts. It is outrageous that the difference between Laguna Beach School District and Capistrano Unified School District is about $1,000 per student per year. Because of the disproportionate (distribution)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The Laguna Beach School District has two new principals. In August, Joanne Culverhouse takes over as principal at El Morro Elementary School. Beginning this month, Stuart Simms replaces Barbara Collard as principal of Laguna Beach High School. Supt. Theresa Daem introduced the two administrators at a recent school board meeting, where she also presented a certificate of appreciation to District Executive Secretary Nancy Vaughan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997
The past 12 months have been exceptionally trying for the Laguna Beach school district. Its remarkable comeback from the brink of financial disaster is a tribute to residents who recognized the importance of good schools to a community and were willing to pay the price. The Laguna Beach Unified School District is one of the few that are financed by property taxes, rather than through state funding. As property tax revenues decreased in recent years, the district was hit hard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1985 | Robert Hanley
For some south Orange County senior citizens, the solution to the high cost of housing might soon be found in a place once reserved mostly for the very young. If a plan involving the county, the Laguna Beach Unified School District and a private, nonprofit agency is successful, work to convert part of an unused elementary school in South Laguna into a low-cost senior housing development will be under way by fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Toughening its stance against graffiti vandals who deface school property, the Laguna Beach school board has decided to withhold grades, diplomas and transcripts from guilty students until their parents pay up to $10,000 to repair damage. As a result of the board's unanimous vote Tuesday, parents could also be required to pay up to an additional $10,000 to reimburse the district if it offers reward money to apprehend the vandals. "Wow, that's very aggressive," said Nina J.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST
Blaming the 1993 firestorm, the recession and the Orange County bankruptcy, the Laguna Beach School District said this week it faces a "major fiscal crisis" and a projected deficit of $1.4 million for the current fiscal year. A statement from the district said a recent analysis of its financial condition has revealed two "very serious" budget problems. One is the projected deficit and the other is a $1-million imbalance between its expenses and its property tax income.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993 | RICHARD CORE
The Laguna Beach Unified School District has reached the $2-million mark in its continuing drive to raise funds for rehabilitating school facilities and improving instructional programs. And, despite the devastation to the community from the Oct. 27 fire, the campaign is continuing toward its $3-million goal, said its director, Cindy Prewitt. More than 300 families and other donors have contributed to the two-year-old drive, Prewitt said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1997
The past 12 months have been exceptionally trying for the Laguna Beach school district. Its remarkable comeback from the brink of financial disaster is a tribute to residents who recognized the importance of good schools to a community and were willing to pay the price. The Laguna Beach Unified School District is one of the few that are financed by property taxes, rather than through state funding. As property tax revenues decreased in recent years, the district was hit hard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST
Blaming the 1993 firestorm, the recession and the Orange County bankruptcy, the Laguna Beach School District said this week it faces a "major fiscal crisis" and a projected deficit of $1.4 million for the current fiscal year. A statement from the district said a recent analysis of its financial condition has revealed two "very serious" budget problems. One is the projected deficit and the other is a $1-million imbalance between its expenses and its property tax income.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST
In a move officials say will generate about $150,000 for the financially strapped Laguna Beach Unified School District, the board of education voted Tuesday night to impose a fee to transport students to and from elementary school. The fee--$200 per student annually, with discounts for larger families--will be in effect for the coming school year, and parents should begin receiving notices about the new policy within weeks.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1995 | LESLIE EARNEST
Despite a still-cloudy financial picture, the Laguna Beach Unified School District board has decided to seek bids to rebuild 14 classrooms burned in the October, 1993, firestorm. School officials say the action gives the district the opportunity to nail down costs and at least begin the rebuilding process. With $1.5 million in insurance money for the project still frozen in the bankrupt county's investment pool, board members are taking the optimistic approach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1993 | RICHARD CORE
The Laguna Beach Unified School District has reached the $2-million mark in its continuing drive to raise funds for rehabilitating school facilities and improving instructional programs. And, despite the devastation to the community from the Oct. 27 fire, the campaign is continuing toward its $3-million goal, said its director, Cindy Prewitt. More than 300 families and other donors have contributed to the two-year-old drive, Prewitt said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1993 | ANNA CEKOLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
PTA president Barbara Norton always knew she had a lot of buddies at the close-knit Top of the World Elementary School. But the loyalty of her school friends became overwhelmingly clear after Norton's home on Caribbean Way was destroyed more than two weeks ago in a firestorm. Since the Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST
Setting the stage for what amounts to a preemptive strike against gang activity and other problems, the Laguna Beach Unified School District on Monday released a broad set of goals intended to keep youngsters from going astray and to boost community and parental involvement with students.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1993 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Toughening its stance against graffiti vandals who deface school property, the Laguna Beach school board has decided to withhold grades, diplomas and transcripts from guilty students until their parents pay up to $10,000 to repair damage. As a result of the board's unanimous vote Tuesday, parents could also be required to pay up to an additional $10,000 to reimburse the district if it offers reward money to apprehend the vandals. "Wow, that's very aggressive," said Nina J.
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