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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using a cutting-edge sonar gun, divers continued their search Monday through the thick silt of the Laguna Lakes for a New Jersey woman who was tracked to the water's edge by search dogs after disappearing a week ago. For the third consecutive day, divers unsuccessfully searched the muddy depths of Orange County's largest natural lake for some sign of Silvia Molina, a 28-year-old Somerset resident who vanished last Tuesday afternoon after leaving a relative's Laguna Beach home for a walk.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 9, 2005 | Sara Lin, Times Staff Writer
For years, fishermen traded tall tales about the beast who lived at the bottom of the lake. He was huge, those who had seen him agreed, pulling ducks underwater and stealing fish from reel lines. Old Bob, the giant alligator snapping turtle of Fullerton's Laguna Lake, was the stuff of legend. In September, workers dredging the lake as part of a restoration project found truth in the rumors as they netted the 4-foot-long, 100-pound turtle. But as quickly as Old Bob surfaced, he disappeared again.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are named unimaginatively--Lake No. 1, Lake No. 2 and Lake No. 3--and their size is so puny some may wonder why they are called lakes at all. But as the only three natural lakes in Orange County, they do hold a certain distinction. And those who have studied them say the Laguna Lakes are the crown jewels of the Laguna Coast Wilderness Park, a sprawling blanket of open space that encircles them.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2001 | JOHN McKINNEY
Lakes are few and far between in Orange County. For the most part, they are decorative contrivances created for city parks, golf courses and housing developments. The county's only natural lakes are the Laguna Lakes in Laguna Canyon, bodies of water replenished by rainfall and possibly underground springs. The largest of the three, Barbaras Lake, is particularly delightful for hikers because it's accessible only by a trail through the engaging James Dilley Greenbelt Preserve.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2001 | JOHN McKINNEY
Lakes are few and far between in Orange County. For the most part, they are decorative contrivances created for city parks, golf courses and housing developments. The county's only natural lakes are the Laguna Lakes in Laguna Canyon, bodies of water replenished by rainfall and possibly underground springs. The largest of the three, Barbaras Lake, is particularly delightful for hikers because it's accessible only by a trail through the engaging James Dilley Greenbelt Preserve.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The environmental impact of widening or realigning Laguna Canyon Road will be the subject of a meeting Thursday. The project, proposed by the Federal Highway Administration, Caltrans and the county, is designed to make the roadway safer. The project would also preserve the Laguna Lakes, currently being polluted by traffic and runoff. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at Thurston Middle School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 1993
Is it possible that with the enlarging of Laguna Lakes with the realignment of Laguna Canyon Road that developers in Newport Beach, Huntington Beach or elsewhere will attempt to draw from the "bank" account of the newly restored ancient wetlands of Laguna Canyon to justify the taking of wetlands elsewhere? As I see it, "banking wetlands" in areas such as Southern California will exacerbate problems of traffic and air pollution, desecrate the little remaining natural coastal environment, in particular, and its few indigenous ecosystems, destroy park potential where it should be allowed to continue to exist and needlessly create inappropriate density.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991
The State Coastal Conservancy has granted a Laguna Beach environmental group $75,000 to help restore the decaying Laguna Lakes, the only existing natural lakes in Orange County. According to Laguna Greenbelt Inc., a grass-roots environmental group established in 1968, the lakes have been invaded by unhealthy algae and vegetation due to the Southland's four-year drought.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1991 | MARLA CONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lake No. 1 is a sick pond, not so golden even on a good day. The slimy muck of its banks is pockmarked with the hoof prints of cattle and lime-green scum bubbles on the surface, attracting buzzing flies. Elisabeth Brown treads carefully along its shore, dodging cow patties as she talks about the troubles and the promise of this little pond and its two sisters--the county's only natural lakes. "What a mess," the president of Laguna Greenbelt says with a sigh.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1995
How pleased I was to read that a visitor, Allan Conoval of New York City, wrote nice things about the beauty of the Laguna Beach he visited 10 years ago and again just recently (Letters, Sept. 3). Still other justifications, I feel, for all Lagunans to take pride in Laguna have been its creation, utilization and preservation of a natural lagoon; a green Main Beach park; a chain of neighborhood beaches; a unique lifeguard tower and operating facilities; marine life preserves; winding and tree-lined streets; street-end access to beaches; family hillside view residences; human-scale business structures; highly rated destination resort hotels, motels, sidewalk cafes and colorful restaurants; accessible "greenbelts"; open space with walking trails and docents; and the Laguna lakes, arts and crafts, theater, active community improvement associations, local publications, modern hospitals, schools and hard-working elected city officials and staffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2001 | JERRY HICKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a teenager, Richard Juarez fondly recalls, he often walked the railroad tracks from his La Habra home to Fullerton, pole and bait box in hand, to fish in Laguna Lake. In the 10 years he has been fishing there, he has noticed a difference. The once-clean lake keeps getting blacker. And the fishing worse. The lake is so contaminated, many fish have died. "It's too bad, because there aren't many places to fish around here," he said. Residents in the hills around the lake share his concern.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | ANDREW GLAZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Aiona Fernandez and her wide-eyed, stroller-bound son, Benjamin, were greeted by squawks from mud hens, white geese and green-necked mallards that dived greedily after bits of stale bread the pair tossed into the lake at Laguna Niguel Regional Park on Wednesday morning. Little did they know, those scraps may be deadly. Bread fed by humans is thought to have caused the botulism deaths of more than 20 male mallards at the lake since late October.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1999 | Chris Ceballos, (949) 248-2150
The environmental impact of widening or realigning Laguna Canyon Road will be the subject of a meeting Thursday. The project, proposed by the Federal Highway Administration, Caltrans and the county, is designed to make the roadway safer. The project would also preserve the Laguna Lakes, currently being polluted by traffic and runoff. The meeting begins at 6 p.m. at Thurston Middle School.
SPORTS
January 8, 1999 | PETE THOMAS
After 300 casts with a dozen lures and finally giving in and soaking glob after glob of Power Bait, Shawn Arnold got his hooks into one of the beautiful Utah rainbows he had heard so much about. It wasn't much for size-- measuring about 14 inches and weighing about a pound and a half-- but it was the only taker after three hours of effort and therefore he considered it a prize. So what did Arnold do?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 25, 1997 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Using a cutting-edge sonar gun, divers continued their search Monday through the thick silt of the Laguna Lakes for a New Jersey woman who was tracked to the water's edge by search dogs after disappearing a week ago. For the third consecutive day, divers unsuccessfully searched the muddy depths of Orange County's largest natural lake for some sign of Silvia Molina, a 28-year-old Somerset resident who vanished last Tuesday afternoon after leaving a relative's Laguna Beach home for a walk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 1996 | LESLIE EARNEST, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They are named unimaginatively--Lake No. 1, Lake No. 2 and Lake No. 3--and their size is so puny some may wonder why they are called lakes at all. But as the only three natural lakes in Orange County, they do hold a certain distinction. And those who have studied them say the Laguna Lakes are the crown jewels of the Laguna Coast Wilderness Park, a sprawling blanket of open space that encircles them.
NEWS
April 16, 1992 | APRIL JACKSON
April is the cruelest month, breeding Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing Memory and desire, stirring Dull roots with spring rain. --T.S. Eliot, The Waste Land , 1922 Laguna Lake Park does not make a good first impression. It starts with the parking lot. Trees are coated with a white dust, sprayed up from car tires on gravel. Pollen-laden pine needles are the color of smog. Dandelions compete with bull thistle for growing room.
NEWS
June 2, 1988 | PATRICK MOTT, Patrick Mott is a regular contributor to Orange County Life
Part of the beauty of Laguna Lake is the sense of the unexpected: You are absolutely certain it isn't going to be where it is. You turn west off Harbor Boulevard onto Hermosa Drive and find yourself in the kind of residential area typical of much of the north Fullerton-Sunny Hills area: low-slung, rambling, ranch-style houses; well-tended lawns and gardens, and relatively tight density. You know what to expect. Schoolyards, an occasional pocket park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 1996 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To freshwater fish at night, you need the right equipment--a sturdy rod and reel, a small lantern, enticing bait and, of course, some luck. But what really helps is a well-stocked lake. That's what draws many anglers to Laguna Niguel Lake--the only regularly stocked freshwater fishing hole in Orange County that's open every evening. Between 1,500 and 2,000 pounds of fish are dumped into the lake at Laguna Niguel Regional Park every other week. "You could be Mr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1995
How pleased I was to read that a visitor, Allan Conoval of New York City, wrote nice things about the beauty of the Laguna Beach he visited 10 years ago and again just recently (Letters, Sept. 3). Still other justifications, I feel, for all Lagunans to take pride in Laguna have been its creation, utilization and preservation of a natural lagoon; a green Main Beach park; a chain of neighborhood beaches; a unique lifeguard tower and operating facilities; marine life preserves; winding and tree-lined streets; street-end access to beaches; family hillside view residences; human-scale business structures; highly rated destination resort hotels, motels, sidewalk cafes and colorful restaurants; accessible "greenbelts"; open space with walking trails and docents; and the Laguna lakes, arts and crafts, theater, active community improvement associations, local publications, modern hospitals, schools and hard-working elected city officials and staffs.
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