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Laguna Laurel

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1988
All of us who live in Orange County and travel its thoroughfares daily are acutely aware of the serious traffic congestion that plagues many of our roads and freeways. The truly sensible approach to solving the county's current traffic problem is to address both the demand side and supply side of the transportation equation. We must curtail peak demand on transportation facilities by employing measures such as alternate work schedules and ride-sharing. We must expand the capacity of existing roads and freeways as well as build new ones.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
Laguna Canyon Road near Laguna Beach has breathtaking beauty, and enough surprising turns to keep drivers on full alert. Along this spectacular road, which features some of the county's last remaining scenic terrain, site after site has become a battleground over land use. The proposed public purchase of one large parcel slated for development needs to be closed soon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001
Laguna Canyon Road near Laguna Beach has breathtaking beauty, and enough surprising turns to keep drivers on full alert. Along this spectacular road, which features some of the county's last remaining scenic terrain, site after site has become a battleground over land use. The proposed public purchase of one large parcel slated for development needs to be closed soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2001 | EVAN HALPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The three billboards hoisted up Burma Shave-style along Laguna Canyon Road just north of Laguna Coast Wilderness Park are clearly intended to provoke: WE HAVE PARK BOND MONEY . . . LET'S GET IT DONE IRVINE COMPANY. The message is courtesy of the Laguna Canyon Foundation, which warns that the clock is ticking on sealing a deal to preserve 175 acres next to the park as open space, rather than have it be developed with more than 1,500 homes. The Irvine Co., which owns the land, helped secure $12.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1989
So home buyers "cherish a view of a golf course second only to an ocean view," this, according to The Times business section ("Orange County Plays Catch-Up on Golf Courses," July 9). Well, that explains it, but it doesn't justify the potential loss of one unique and environmentally fragile coastal region which is the next target for golf course community construction. I'm talking about Laguna Canyon and the Irvine Co.'s planned "Laguna Laurel" housing project, which, if it ever succeeds, would put 3,200 homes, shops and services around a 276-acre playground for mattress magnates, or the likes thereof.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1990 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND
City officials and representatives from the Irvine Co. are set to return to the negotiating table today in an effort to resolve their longstanding dispute over a 3,200-home planned community proposed for Laguna Canyon. Both sides are refusing to discuss the series of meetings held behind closed doors at the Irvine Co.'s Fashion Island headquarters. City officials, however, said the two parties may be close to announcing a compromise over the 2,150-acre Laguna Laurel project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1989 | LESLIE HERZOG
City leaders will meet with Irvine Co. officials Friday to discuss a new proposal for the hotly contested Laguna Laurel housing project. "The council doesn't want it (the offer) discussed until it's presented to the Irvine Co.," Mayor Robert F. Gentry said. "But I think it's extremely reasonable, and we're serious." An Irvine Co. spokeswoman also declined to comment until after Friday's meeting. The city's proposal will counter a previous Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1988 | MARIANN HANSEN, Times Staff Writer
A group of Laguna Beach conservationists announced Monday that it wants to buy about 3,000 acres of prime canyon land from the Irvine Co.--part of its last-ditch effort to stop the company's controversial Laguna Laurel development. Irvine Co. officials responded that the Laguna Canyon Conservancy's goals are unrealistic. The land, they said, is not for sale--unless the residents can come up with several hundred million dollars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, Times Staff Writer
Elizabeth Brown's war chest in her battle to keep urbanization out of one of the last natural coastal canyons in Southern California is a set of dusty file cabinets stored in her Laguna Canyon home. The ammunition, Brown said, consists of thousands of documents that chronicle a decade of opposition to the Laguna Laurel Planned Community, a 2,150-acre project being developed by the Irvine Co. at the mouth of Laguna Canyon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 1990
The negotiations between the Irvine Co. and the city of Laguna Beach and area environmental groups for purchase of the Laguna Laurel property in Laguna Canyon are now as close to complete impasse as negotiations can get. The major stumbling block to meaningful progress in continued negotiations was the final selling price demanded by the Irvine Co.'s Donald Bren. That price was $90 million for the total project. The Laguna Beach representatives, combing every possible funding source for possible dollars, could see no possible scenario that would raise anything in excess of $70 million without a very high risk of a default down the line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1994 | NANCY HSU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The state Fish and Game Commission on Friday unanimously designated Coal Canyon in Anaheim an ecological reserve, but defied environmentalists by also deciding to allow hunting there. The commission, meeting in Monterey, Calif., also extended the ecological reserve status to the 76-acre Laguna Laurel in Laguna Canyon, as well as to eight other sites throughout the state. No hunting will be allowed in Laguna Laurel, however.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1991
(In his column on) the Laguna Laurel land purchase (Orange County Voices, "Land Deal Is a Blueprint for Public-Private Cooperation," Aug. 28), Paul Freeman speaks of lessons to be learned from the historic agreement wherein the city of Laguna Beach contracted to purchase land in Laguna Canyon from the Irvine Co. He alludes to the happy ending to be achieved when environmentalists, developers and local governments come to the table to arrive at...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1991 | PAUL FREEMAN, Paul Freeman, a partner of Nelson Communications in Costa Mesa, ran the bond campaign that helped provide the recent $33-million first payment to the Irvine Co. and
Good novels have a denouement, and the Laguna Canyon story is no exception. The recent transfer of $33 million from the city of Laguna Beach to the Irvine Co. transferred much of the 2,150-acre Laguna Laurel property in Laguna Canyon from private to public ownership. A completed purchase, though not a foregone conclusion, now seems much more likely. Four more payments are due, with Laguna leaders confident of all but the final payment, due in 1995.
NEWS
June 22, 1991 | JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Board of Supervisors is expected next week to approve the creation of the largest regional park in Orange County, a 10,000- to 15,000-acre expanse that will include land once set aside for the controversial Laguna Laurel housing development. Friday, county officials said the supervisors are planning to make the first payment of $2.5 million toward purchase of scenic coastal parkland at their next meeting Tuesday.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city and the Irvine Co. have negotiated an historic agreement that will allow Laguna Beach to begin buying 2,150 acres of Laguna Canyon for $78 million. The pact, scheduled to go before the City Council on Tuesday, would set in motion the preservation plan for one of the last undeveloped coastal canyons in Southern California. The plan is based on an agreement in principle reached last October by the city, the company, environmental groups and Orange County officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the absence of a final sales agreement, the City Council on Tuesday authorized a $20-million bond sale to help the city make its first payment to the Irvine Co. for land in Laguna Canyon. But before the vote, council members cautioned that they still had the option of backing out of the bond sale if land-purchase negotiations with the developer are not concluded to their liking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Local environmentalists and city officials attempting to keep development out of Laguna Canyon learned Thursday evening the appraised value of the 2,150-acre canyon site owned by the Irvine Co. But negotiators for the preservationists and the company refused to disclose that figure--estimated earlier at about $100 million--after a closed-door session with the land appraiser. "We are dealing with this professionally," said Councilman Robert F. Gentry as he emerged from the meeting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Beach city officials Tuesday downplayed a threat by Supervisor Thomas F. Riley to block a $10-million contribution to help purchase 2,150 acres of Laguna Canyon if the city sues to halt the proposed San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. But they conceded that Riley's comments concerning the tollway--long opposed by the city because of environmental concerns--threatened to upset the city's campaign for a $20-million bond measure on the Nov. 6 ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For years, Laguna Beach resident Sandy Schwarzstein, 51, had seen Laguna Canyon from her car while driving along Laguna Canyon Road. But not until Saturday did she learn what the canyon really looks like. "I am very impressed with it," she said as she stood in a serene sycamore grove far removed from Laguna Canyon Road. "South Orange County is so overloaded right now with developments and housing that I think it would be very sad to see this property go."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Laguna Beach city officials Tuesday downplayed a threat by Supervisor Thomas F. Riley to block a $10-million contribution to help purchase 2,150 acres of Laguna Canyon if the city sues to halt the proposed San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor. But they conceded that Riley's comments concerning the tollway--long opposed by the city because of environmental concerns--threatened to upset the city's campaign for a $20-million bond measure on the Nov. 6 ballot.
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