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Laguna Laurel Development

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
Encouraged by fresh poll results showing three-fourths of city voters would pay higher taxes to preserve Laguna Canyon as open space, the City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to pay for the costs of placing a bond measure to buy the canyon on the November ballot. If approved by voters, a $20-million bond would be financed by an increase in property taxes of just under 8% for 20 years. The average yearly cost to a property owner whose home has an assessed value of $300,000 would be $144.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1991 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, TIMES URBAN AFFAIRS WRITER
While approving several Orange County highway projects on Wednesday, the California Transportation Commission allocated $1 million to help purchase parkland in Laguna Canyon. Laguna Beach, which earlier this year agreed to buy the 2,150-acre Laguna Laurel parcel from the Irvine Co. for $78 million, applied for the money but then refused to accept the conditions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1990
Claiming it did not want to influence ongoing negotiations or a November ballot proposition concerning Laguna Canyon, a state Court of Appeal panel in Santa Ana postponed until January a case challenging the proposed Laguna Laurel development. Two environmental groups, Laguna Greenbelt Inc. and Laguna Canyon Conservancy, are appealing an earlier Superior Court ruling upholding the development agreement between Orange County and the Irvine Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1991 | JIM NEWTON
The Board of Supervisors voted Tuesday to create Orange County's largest regional park, a 10,000-acre crescent that will wrap partway around Laguna Beach, protecting environmentally sensitive land from development while opening new trails and wilderness areas. Supervisor Thomas F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1988
I am amazed. On April 27, your newspaper reported that Tom Rogers, founder of a group called Orange County Tomorrow, plans to start a recall campaign against Board of Supervisors' Chairman Harriett Wieder and Vice Chairman Tom Riley because Rogers disagrees with the way they voted on the Laguna Laurel development agreement. What a preposterous waste of time and money. I thought recalls were for elected officials who have done something wrong. Wieder and Riley have voted according to the dictates of their consciences.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to place a $20-million bond on the Nov. 6 ballot to buy open space in Laguna Canyon. The bond would be used to buy at least part of the 2,150-acre development site between El Toro Road and the San Diego Freeway. The Irvine Co. owns the land and has long planned to build the 3,200-home Laguna Laurel development on the site.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1988
Back in 1977, many Orange County residents applauded the successful efforts of Shirley Grindle to minimize the chances of campaign contributors exerting undue influence on the decisions of the Board of Supervisors. For over 10 years, not one supervisor has been charged with violating Grindle's TIN CUP ordinance, which proves the measure has served as an effective deterrent to conflict of interest votes. But now it appears that Grindle is not satisfied with mere deterrence. She has fashioned her TIN CUP into a political weapon and is attempting to impale Supervisor Harriett M. Wieder with it. Grindle's assertion that a $2,500 contribution to Wieder's congressional campaign by the Irvine Co. Employees Political Action Committee falls within the provisions of the TIN CUP ordinance has been soundly rejected by a battery of legal experts, including Orange County Counsel Adrian Kuyper.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
City officials and Irvine Co. executives began meeting this week with representatives of several Orange County environmental groups to discuss a proposed countywide bond measure that would raise money to buy pristine Laguna Canyon so that it can be saved from development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
The City Council has voted to take steps to place a $10-million bond measure on the Nov. 6 ballot for the purchase of open space in Laguna Canyon. The bond would be used to buy at least part of a 2,150-acre Laguna Laurel development site between El Toro Road and the San Diego Freeway.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After days of intense negotiations, the Irvine Co. informally agreed Tuesday to sell 2,150 acres of Laguna Canyon land to the city for $78 million over a five-year period. However, the "agreement in principle" reached between the developer, environmentalists and city negotiators needs to be studied by City Council members before they give their final approval, officials said. The boards of other organizations involved in the negotiations must also approve the agreement before it is finalized.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 3, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Environmentalists and city officials patted themselves on the back Tuesday as the City Council unanimously approved a historic agreement to buy 2,150 acres of scenic Laguna Canyon land from the Irvine Co. But approval of the $78-million five-year purchase agreement, which preserves one of the last undeveloped coastal canyons in Southern California, did not come without some criticism.
NEWS
March 30, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city and the Irvine Co. have negotiated an historic agreement that will allow Laguna Beach to begin buying 2,150 acres of Laguna Canyon for $78 million. The pact, scheduled to go before the City Council on Tuesday, would set in motion the preservation plan for one of the last undeveloped coastal canyons in Southern California. The plan is based on an agreement in principle reached last October by the city, the company, environmental groups and Orange County officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 20, 1991
Close but still not close enough is how Mayor Neil G. Fitzpatrick on Tuesday described continuing negotiations over a contract allowing the city to buy Laguna Canyon land owned by the Irvine Co. The agreement, which would set in motion the preservation plan for one of the last undeveloped coastal canyons in Southern California, is expected to be based on an agreement-in-principle reached last October by the city, the company, environmental groups and Orange County officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1991 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite the absence of a final sales agreement, the City Council on Tuesday authorized a $20-million bond sale to help the city make its first payment to the Irvine Co. for land in Laguna Canyon. But before the vote, council members cautioned that they still had the option of backing out of the bond sale if land-purchase negotiations with the developer are not concluded to their liking.
NEWS
November 12, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The private celebration at the posh Center Club in Costa Mesa a week before last Tuesday's election demonstrated how far they had come. After dining on exotic foods and toasting the historic agreement to preserve Laguna Canyon--one of the last undeveloped coastal canyons in Southern California--the motley group of environmentalists, government officials and Irvine Co. executives were entertained by company Vice President Carol Hoffman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By a margin that surprised even the most ardent supporters of preserving Laguna Canyon, residents of this coastal village approved a $20-million bond measure to help buy canyon land, thus holding back massive residential and commercial development on its pristine hillsides. Now the hard work begins. Campaign and city officials celebrated Wednesday after nearly 80% of those who voted in Tuesday's election agreed to tax themselves to turn the land into a wilderness park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1990 | MARK I. PINSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Although the fractious battle between the city of Laguna Beach and the Irvine Co. over Laguna Canyon has apparently been settled, the related question of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor tollway--scheduled to run through the canyon--remains in dispute. Earlier this week, the Irvine Co. agreed to sell 2,150 acres of the area known as Laguna Laurel to the city for $78 million, scrapping plans for a 3,200-unit housing development and several commercial centers.
NEWS
November 7, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what may be the last chance to prevent development of Laguna Canyon, early election returns Tuesday showed strong support for a bond measure to purchase canyon land but were just shy of the two-thirds majority needed for passage. The $20-million Measure H would increase property taxes to buy 2,150 acres of prime canyon land along Laguna Canyon Road. On a home with an assessed value of $200,000, property taxes would increase by an average of $59 a year for 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1990 | GEBE MARTINEZ
Responding to criticism that municipal projects may suffer if the city buys the Laguna Laurel property, the City Council pledged Tuesday to avoid the use of capital improvement funds to buy open space. The funds pay for such items as street maintenance and new trees.
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