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Laguna Niguel Ca Government Officials

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
Organizers of a new committee who are fed up with "unchecked development" will launch a petition drive today for a ballot initiative that would protect the city's ridgelines. If members of the Laguna Niguel Ridgeline Protection and Preservation Committee gather enough signatures by Aug. 7, the City Council can adopt the measure or move to place it on the November ballot. The group must collect roughly 3,500 signatures to qualify for the ballot.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1990 | ROSE ELLEN O'CONNOR and GEORGE FRANK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In February, 1988, Laguna Niguel officials sat down with a developer to swap some land for the public good: The developer was to give up eight scenic acres of open space and in return Laguna Niguel was to give up three acres of slopes. Last week, the officials were dismayed to learn that they had actually given up not three acres but 96 that were supposed to have been reserved for future parkland.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990 | LESLIE EARNEST
Almost a year after Laguna Niguel's incorporation, the City Council shifted leadership roles just slightly Tuesday night, reelecting Mayor Patricia C. Bates to a second one-year term and selecting a new mayor pro tem. Bates was elected the city's first mayor by her colleagues last December, when she outdistanced 23 competitors as Laguna Niguel became Orange County's 29th city. The council also voted Tuesday to install Councilman Thomas W. Wilson as mayor pro tem, replacing James F. Krembas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1991 | LEN HALL
A recall campaign aimed at unseating City Councilman Paul M. Christiansen was thwarted Wednesday when its supporters failed to file the required petition by the 5 p.m. deadline. The failure marks the end of a recall effort that at one time targeted all five members of the City Council. The effort was sparked by a controversial ridgeline protection ordinance endorsed by 4,000 city voters last fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 10, 1991 | LESLIE EARNEST
A Laguna Niguel man who spearheaded an unsuccessful recall campaign against four City Council members has charged that he was defamed in flyers distributed to counteract the recall drive and has filed a $10-million claim against the city. Eddie Rose submitted the claim to the city Monday afternoon along with a copy of a flyer distributed in shopping centers during the final weeks of the recall effort.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1989
Capping a three-year struggle for self-government, new City Council members on Friday were sworn into office as their upscale community became officially recognized as the county's 29th city. During a two-hour inauguration ceremony that was marked with emotional speeches and martial music, the new council members also selected Councilwoman Patricia C. Bates to serve as the city's first mayor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1989 | JAMES M. GOMEZ
In one of their first official acts as a public body, Laguna Niguel officials agreed Tuesday to join a panel that is planning a tollway connecting Newport Beach to southern Mission Viejo. Members of the San Joaquin Hills Transportation Corridor Agency met with city officials before their first regular council meeting to describe the design of the transportation corridor and to discuss the status of the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1989 | BILL BILLITER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patricia Carmody Bates said she was pleasantly surprised this fall to find out how many people in Laguna Niguel knew about her. "I'd go campaigning door to door, and people would thank me for my work in the community," Bates said. "I've been in Laguna Niguel for many years, and I've worked on a number of issues, and actually I've gotten a lot of satisfaction out of helping people. And I guess when you enjoy working with people and helping people, you attract people to you."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA
A recall drive against Councilman Mark Goodman was cleared by City Hall this week, and supporters say they'll waste no time gathering signatures. "We're working as we speak," said Jim Tarvin, spokesman for Citizens Against Government Corruption, which has four months to collect 6,100 signatures to put the recall on the November ballot. The campaign was sparked by a controversial October letter written by Councilman Eddie Rose on city stationery and sent to newspapers.
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