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Lainie Kazan

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a cute bit of acting, singer-actress Lainie Kazan acknowledged an ovation from the packed house Wednesday at Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood by declaring, "Acting is OK, but it ain't it!" What Kazan was suggesting to the adoring, celebrity-sprinkled audience was that she enjoyed singing more than making movies, that it was more satisfying. Still, theatrical skills play a big role when Kazan steps in front of a band, here a trio with pianist Bob Kaye.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cabaret singing is serious business. Musicality, dramatic skills and a capacity to work upfront and close with an audience are essential. So, too, is the less obvious but, if anything, more important ability to do it all with subtlety and imagination. After all, the repertoire performed by most cabaret artists has been sung over and over again.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
Lainie Kazan, making her first Los Angeles nightclub singing appearance in years at the Cinegrill, promised to "keep the comedy in the closet." Fortunately, she didn't quite manage to keep her pledge. The actress-vocalist--whose performances in the films "29th Street" and "My Favorite Year" threatened to stamp her as the ultimate ethnic mother--demonstrated early in the engagement that she is still a sultry performer, and a first-rate musical talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1998 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a cute bit of acting, singer-actress Lainie Kazan acknowledged an ovation from the packed house Wednesday at Catalina Bar & Grill in Hollywood by declaring, "Acting is OK, but it ain't it!" What Kazan was suggesting to the adoring, celebrity-sprinkled audience was that she enjoyed singing more than making movies, that it was more satisfying. Still, theatrical skills play a big role when Kazan steps in front of a band, here a trio with pianist Bob Kaye.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Cabaret singing is serious business. Musicality, dramatic skills and a capacity to work upfront and close with an audience are essential. So, too, is the less obvious but, if anything, more important ability to do it all with subtlety and imagination. After all, the repertoire performed by most cabaret artists has been sung over and over again.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Red-hot mama or Jewish mama, sultry chanteuse or haimische yenta? That's the riddle when it comes to the enigmatic singer-actress Lainie Kazan. The answer, as her fans know well, is she is both. "I'm able to become, hopefully, this seductive nightclub singer who sings all these tragic tunes and then [I] make people laugh as Aunt Frida on [the TV series] 'The Nanny,' " says the magnetic Kazan, seated on a couch in her Bel-Air home with a teensy white poof of a dog named Ella glued to her side.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1986 | David Fox and FO and FO
The man on the left is George Gershwin. The man on the right is . . . Lainie Kazan. She's made up to look like the composer for the upcoming "Gershwin's Trunk" episode of Steven Spielberg's "Amazing Stories." Kazan plays a psychic through whom Gershwin's spirit returns to deliver his unpublished songs--in this case they are actually new songs written by composer John Meyer to parody the style of George and (lyricist) Ira Gershwin.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
Lainie Kazan approaches singing pretty much the way she deals with her other entertainment endeavors: full out and sometimes over the top. Diva Grande. Soulful Torch Singer. Sexy Chanteuse. Kazan--who can never be accused of lacking a sense of humor--would probably laugh heartily at the descriptions, but there's no denying their appropriateness. It pairs with a self-supplied favorite description of a few of her more prominent acting roles: Jewish Mamma.
NEWS
March 10, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: Monday's party at The Gate nightclub celebrating the home-video release of "Flashing on the Sixties." The director, photographer Lisa Law, was at ground zero for many of the tie-dyed decade's seminal events--everything from having Dylan writing songs in her home to running the free kitchen at Woodstock. Actor Severn Darden described their shared Hollywood Hills house as "like living in a cultural carbuncle." Who Was There: Law's friends, a crowd laden with '60s credentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Isn't all-stops-out raunchy bad taste enough for a movie these days? Unfortunately, no. It is still nice to have some wit about the enterprise, some bite to the satire and a certain urgency to the story being told, which is the core of what's the matter with Paul Bartel's "Lust in the Dust" (citywide). Good, crisp satire is a joy, and vulgarity in the defense of it can be good, dirty fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Red-hot mama or Jewish mama, sultry chanteuse or haimische yenta? That's the riddle when it comes to the enigmatic singer-actress Lainie Kazan. The answer, as her fans know well, is she is both. "I'm able to become, hopefully, this seductive nightclub singer who sings all these tragic tunes and then [I] make people laugh as Aunt Frida on [the TV series] 'The Nanny,' " says the magnetic Kazan, seated on a couch in her Bel-Air home with a teensy white poof of a dog named Ella glued to her side.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1995 | DON HECKMAN
Lainie Kazan approaches singing pretty much the way she deals with her other entertainment endeavors: full out and sometimes over the top. Diva Grande. Soulful Torch Singer. Sexy Chanteuse. Kazan--who can never be accused of lacking a sense of humor--would probably laugh heartily at the descriptions, but there's no denying their appropriateness. It pairs with a self-supplied favorite description of a few of her more prominent acting roles: Jewish Mamma.
NEWS
March 10, 1993 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: Monday's party at The Gate nightclub celebrating the home-video release of "Flashing on the Sixties." The director, photographer Lisa Law, was at ground zero for many of the tie-dyed decade's seminal events--everything from having Dylan writing songs in her home to running the free kitchen at Woodstock. Actor Severn Darden described their shared Hollywood Hills house as "like living in a cultural carbuncle." Who Was There: Law's friends, a crowd laden with '60s credentials.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1991 | DON HECKMAN
Lainie Kazan, making her first Los Angeles nightclub singing appearance in years at the Cinegrill, promised to "keep the comedy in the closet." Fortunately, she didn't quite manage to keep her pledge. The actress-vocalist--whose performances in the films "29th Street" and "My Favorite Year" threatened to stamp her as the ultimate ethnic mother--demonstrated early in the engagement that she is still a sultry performer, and a first-rate musical talent.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 21, 1986 | David Fox and FO and FO
The man on the left is George Gershwin. The man on the right is . . . Lainie Kazan. She's made up to look like the composer for the upcoming "Gershwin's Trunk" episode of Steven Spielberg's "Amazing Stories." Kazan plays a psychic through whom Gershwin's spirit returns to deliver his unpublished songs--in this case they are actually new songs written by composer John Meyer to parody the style of George and (lyricist) Ira Gershwin.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 8, 1985 | SHEILA BENSON, Times Film Critic
Isn't all-stops-out raunchy bad taste enough for a movie these days? Unfortunately, no. It is still nice to have some wit about the enterprise, some bite to the satire and a certain urgency to the story being told, which is the core of what's the matter with Paul Bartel's "Lust in the Dust" (citywide). Good, crisp satire is a joy, and vulgarity in the defense of it can be good, dirty fun.
NEWS
November 1, 1991 | BILL HIGGINS
The Scene: The industry screening of 20th Century Fox's "29th Street" at the Cineplex Odeon in Century City. A party followed at Bar One on the Sunset-Strip. The film's theme--an Italian-Americna on the fringe of the mob wins the lottery--has been called Capra-esque. "It's like if John Gotti made 'It's a Wonderful Life,' " said one guest.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
The Bleat Goes On: "Join Us!," the second in a series of benefits to raise monies for financially strapped Los Angeles Theatre Center, comes along Monday at 8 p.m. at the theater, 514 S. Spring St. The evening of comedy and music has a star-laden cast, including Jonelle Allen, Georgia Brown, Roscoe Lee Brown, Danny Glover, Ronnie Graham, Lainie Kazan, Sally Kirkland, Martin Landau, Rita Moreno, Edward James Olmos and Karen Morrow. The theater is seeking to raise $100,000 by Sept. 1.
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