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Lainie Nelson

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lainie Nelson is way too young to have any personal familiarity with the World War II years. So how, then, did she become so intrigued by songs and popular culture of the '40s--so much so that she created "The White Cliffs of Dover," a tribute to the rich musical emotions of the period? "It was the end of innocence," she said. "And it was a time in which the songs were filled with real-life feelings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lainie Nelson is way too young to have any personal familiarity with the World War II years. So how, then, did she become so intrigued by songs and popular culture of the '40s--so much so that she created "The White Cliffs of Dover," a tribute to the rich musical emotions of the period? "It was the end of innocence," she said. "And it was a time in which the songs were filled with real-life feelings.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1986 | LIANNE STEVENS
Who can fail to adore Mame Dennis? Thirty-two years after she first appeared in a novel by Patrick Dennis ( nom de plume of Edward Everett Tanner), she's still the toast of Manhattan, the belle of the South, and an inspirational ideal. "Life's a banquet and most poor sons of bitches are starving to death," Mame declares. She is totally immersed in her own ongoing campaign to give lively sustenance to as many poor souls as she can squeeze into her Prohibition-era social whirl.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1991 | JAN HERMAN
The decline of the Broadway musical in cultural relevance--"Miss Saigon," Stephen Sondheim and Andrew Lloyd Weber notwithstanding--would seem to be linked to the rise of rock 'n' roll as the pop music of choice for the millions of young people who have really lousy, lowbrow taste. That is a commonly held opinion in theater circles, the conventional wisdom, in fact, if not the whole truth.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 1991 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Performers Susan Watson, Lainie Nelson, George Ball and Dan Gettinger call their show "A Broadway Celebration." At Pepperdine's Smothers Theatre, where the touring production stopped on Sunday, they made it clear why they were celebrating. Less clear was why certain obvious names were left out of the party. Most of the big names behind the great Broadway show songs are the guests of honor here--Richard Rodgers, Jerome Kern, Lorenz Hart, Oscar Hammerstein II, Jule Styne.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
Granny has a problem. She's eating her family out of house and home. "The story revolves around a woman and her insatiable appetites," said Raul Moncada, who translated Argentine playwright Roberto Cossa's dark comedy, "The Granny" (La Nonna), opening Saturday on the Cassius Carter Stage at San Diego's Old Globe. "It's also about the things the family comes up with to solve the problem. And it asks the questions, 'What's your breaking point?' 'At what point do you sell out your moral values?'
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