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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 12, 1997
Re "Protest Fails to Derail Plan to Poison Fish," April 30: It's hard for me to conceive how introduction of rotenone, trichloroethylene (TCE) and other chemicals into Lake Davis will not have "long-term health effects," as state officials contend. Although it will likely kill off the aggressive pike population as intended, what comes to my mind concerns the introduction of these chemicals into ground water beneath the lake and their potential to migrate toward water wells in the vicinity in the coming decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
PORTOLA, Calif. -- California officials have completed the grim task of collecting fish killed in last month's poisoning of Lake Davis to exterminate the northern pike. California Department of Fish and Game crews have gathered nearly 50,000 pounds of fish since Sept. 21, when 16,000 gallons of a toxic chemical were poured into the Sierra Nevada reservoir.
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NEWS
July 2, 1999 | Associated Press
Another newly spawned northern pike was found in Lake Davis, bringing the total to five and raising concerns that the fish may have become established in the mountain lake, which state authorities poisoned in 1997 to eradicate the nonnative predator. State officials treated the lake with poison in October 1997 to try to kill the pike and protect California salmon and trout downstream.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- For half a dozen years now, Ivan Paulsen has ventured where few wildlife biologists dared: the thorny political thicket of exterminating the pike of Lake Davis. Last week, Paulsen quietly watched the fruits of his labor unfold.
NEWS
May 28, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nineteen months after the state poisoned Lake Davis to eradicate the voracious northern pike--destroying all animal life in the lake along with the local water supply--the pike have reappeared. Two of the nonnative pike--which state biologists fear could threaten the state's fragile salmon fisheries 130 miles away--were caught in Lake Davis this week, causing great consternation in the nearby town of Portola, which is heavily dependent on outdoor tourism.
NEWS
October 17, 1997 | From Associated Press
Dead fish lay scattered Thursday along the shores of poisoned Lake Davis, where state fish and game officials are trying to exterminate the predatory northern pike to protect downstream trout and salmon fisheries. State workers skimmed dead pike and trout from the lake and piled them along the shore for disposal. Authorities began pouring 16,000 gallons of liquid and 60,000 pounds of powdered poison into the 7-mile-long lake shortly after dawn Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A decade after poisoning a scenic Sierra reservoir in a controversial and failed attempt to exterminate invading northern pike, California wildlife officials proposed Tuesday to again turn Lake Davis into a chemical stew in hopes of finally finishing off the saw-toothed predatory fish. While the last effort to treat the lake caused an uproar in nearby Portola and shut down what had been the tiny city's main source of water, this time the proposal is getting a far more friendly reception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 2007 | From the Associated Press
PORTOLA, Calif. -- California officials have completed the grim task of collecting fish killed in last month's poisoning of Lake Davis to exterminate the northern pike. California Department of Fish and Game crews have gathered nearly 50,000 pounds of fish since Sept. 21, when 16,000 gallons of a toxic chemical were poured into the Sierra Nevada reservoir.
NEWS
July 30, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The worst-case scenario has just materialized for the beleaguered people of tiny Portola: Not only are the rapacious northern pike back in nearby Lake Davis, but they have reproduced and are probably entrenched again. The state Department of Fish and Game announced Thursday that a two-day electro-fishing effort--in which biologists in boats send shock waves into the lake to stun and identify fish--recovered 28 pike of varying size.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
SACRAMENTO -- For half a dozen years now, Ivan Paulsen has ventured where few wildlife biologists dared: the thorny political thicket of exterminating the pike of Lake Davis. Last week, Paulsen quietly watched the fruits of his labor unfold.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
PORTOLA, Calif. -- Four miles north of this High Sierra town, the front-porch gang at the Grizzly Store recently threw a shindig to ring out another fishing season at Lake Davis and curse the dreaded predator that has haunted these parts the past decade. Folks came out of the hills, more than 200 strong, to enjoy bubbling beans, barbecued tri-tip and beer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
State wildlife officials are girding this summer for a chemical assault on the dreaded Northern Pike, a carnivorous fish that for more than a decade has bedeviled scenic Lake Davis in the High Sierra. Ten years after the state poisoned the water in a highly controversial and ultimately unsuccessful bid to exterminate the pike, officials once again plan to treat Lake Davis with a menu of fish-killing chemicals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
A decade after poisoning a scenic Sierra reservoir in a controversial and failed attempt to exterminate invading northern pike, California wildlife officials proposed Tuesday to again turn Lake Davis into a chemical stew in hopes of finally finishing off the saw-toothed predatory fish. While the last effort to treat the lake caused an uproar in nearby Portola and shut down what had been the tiny city's main source of water, this time the proposal is getting a far more friendly reception.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 2005 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
Bill Powers doesn't seem the civil disobedience sort. But it wasn't too long ago that the Plumas County public official tugged a wet suit on and swam into frigid Lake Davis, chaining himself to a buoy. The year was 1997, and Powers wanted to keep state wildlife officials from poisoning the High Sierra reservoir in a bid to crush invading northern pike, a fearsome threat to the lake's trophy trout and downstream salmon and steelhead.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2003 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
If this were a B-grade science fiction film, the credits would be rolling about now. The invaders would be dead, the good guys proven triumphant. Unfortunately, the predatory northern pike don't know when to quit at Lake Davis. So far, the voracious and fast-spawning fish have been hit with explosives. They've been choked with chemicals and stunned with electric shock. They've been scooped up in nets and herded into narrow sloughs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2002 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have been poisoned, stunned and scooped into nets. Soon, they may be blown up. This spring, the state plans to launch a new line of attack on the thus-far-indomitable northern pike of Lake Davis. The Department of Fish and Game intends to explode detonation cord in pockets of the Plumas County reservoir to kill the unwanted pike, which prey on the lake's trout. The process will not, the department says, be like setting off land mines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2007 | Eric Bailey, Times Staff Writer
PORTOLA, Calif. -- Four miles north of this High Sierra town, the front-porch gang at the Grizzly Store recently threw a shindig to ring out another fishing season at Lake Davis and curse the dreaded predator that has haunted these parts the past decade. Folks came out of the hills, more than 200 strong, to enjoy bubbling beans, barbecued tri-tip and beer.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | MARIA L. La GANGA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First the good news: A year and a half after state wildlife officials poisoned Lake Davis to rid the alpine waterway of a voracious, predatory fish, property and business owners are finally being reimbursed for losses caused by the eradication effort. Now the bad news: The Portola City Council recently voted unanimously not to resume drawing its water supply from the lake, even though health officials have declared that the Eastern Sierra lake is safe for drinking.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 10, 2001
This isn't just a fish story, it's a nightmare. It's about the pickle the state is in because of the pike in Lake Davis. The northern pike, that is, a voracious, predatory invader. Where the pike is native, as in parts of the Midwest, it's prized by anglers. Elsewhere, the pike is an outlaw, decimating other species. A $14-million pike control program by the Department of Fish and Game doesn't seem to be working.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2001 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a good season for northern pike in Lake Davis. That is bad news--for California taxpayers, for rainbow trout and for anglers. Four years after the state conducted a controversial $14-million program to rid the Plumas County mountain reservoir of the pesky nonnative, the pike population is rapidly expanding. About 5,000 pike were caught by state Fish and Game Department workers this year, about eight times the number snared the previous year.
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