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Lake Superior Land Co

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BUSINESS
December 21, 1993 | JOHN O'DELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Koll Real Estate Group Inc. said it has completed a previously announced deal with Libra Invest & Trade Ltd. that helps reduce Koll's debt by nearly 40%, to $140 million from $230 million at the end of last year. In one transaction, Koll swapped its interest in its Lake Superior Land Co. subsidiary for approximately $42.
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BUSINESS
October 20, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stock for Securities Swap: Koll Real Estate Group Inc. of Newport Beach, formerly Bolsa Chica Co., said it is discussing swapping stock for its own securities held by Libra Invest & Trade Ltd. in return for a stake in Lake Superior Land Co. Libra owns $53 million worth of Koll debentures; 5.9 million shares, or 15% of Koll's common stock; and 28% of Koll's preferred stock, or 12 million shares.
BUSINESS
March 31, 1995
Koll Real Estate Group Inc., the Newport Beach commercial and residential real estate development services company, reported a net loss of $18 million, or 41 cents a share, for 1994. That compares with a net loss of $14.3 million, or 17 cents a share, for 1993, which included a onetime charge of $36 million from an accounting change. Revenue rose 28% to $21.4 million from $16.7 million. The company recorded a loss of $5.1 million, or 11 cents a share, for the fourth quarter.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Bolsa Chica Co. said Thursday that it will acquire the U.S. real estate development operations of Koll Co. for $4.7 million in cash. The new development company, Koll Real Estate Group Inc., will own the Bolsa Chica Wetlands, part of 1,700 acres of environmentally sensitive coastal land near Huntington Beach. Richard Ortwein, previously regional president of the Newport Beach office of Koll Co., will be president of the new company.
NEWS
June 25, 1989 | PAIGE St. JOHN, Associated Press
Preserving the wilderness once was left largely to the government. Now, private trusts are buying up land across the country in an effort to save the unplowed, the undrained and the undeveloped. That much is obvious on the northern border of Michigan, on a spur of land that locals call the beginning of the world and tourists say is the end. Free-lance naturalist Jim Rooks, trudging deep into the stand of towering Estivant pines on a recent day, suddenly stopped and pointed with the exuberance of a child.
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