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Lake Titicaca

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TRAVEL
November 26, 2000 | MIKE McINTYRE
I first heard the name Lake Titicaca in my sixth-grade geography class. Once the snickering stopped, most of us thought it would be a cool place to visit. After 32 years, I went to see for myself. It wasn't hard to find. Andrea and I hopped a northbound bus in La Paz, and three hours later we stood on the shore of the lake that legend claims gave birth to the Incas and the sun. Straddling the border of Bolivia and Peru at 12,500 feet, it's one of the highest navigable lakes in the world.
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TRAVEL
August 18, 2013 | Marshall S. Berdan
As anyone who has been to Ecuador's Galapagos knows, a trip to those islands is the journey of a lifetime. But with per-person prices that can start at $3,000, it might have to be a trip of the next lifetime. Fortunately for Galapagos-aspirers like me, my wife and our twin 12-year-old daughters, there are the Ballestas Islands, which are known as the Poor Man's Galapagos. The Ballestas lie just 10 miles off the southern coast of Peru and are easily accessible by boat from Paracas, a small, sun-drenched working port and tourist center.
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NEWS
February 16, 1997 | LYNN F. MONAHAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boatman Jorge Chacra cuts his engine and grasps a long pole to push his way through the thick, bright green layer of weed floating on Puno Bay. Just off shore on Lake Titicaca, the lawn-like carpet of tiny aquatic plants looks deceptively natural against the blue sky. Chacra, who earns his living taking tourists to the famous floating reed islands, doesn't want the tangled green mass clogging the engine.
TRAVEL
September 4, 2005
MACHU PICCHU was on Jeremy Arkes' must-see-before-I-die list, so earlier this summer he and six friends traveled to Peru for two weeks. They were on a train from Cusco to Lake Titicaca when he leaned out from the rear car's balcony with his Nikon N80 to snap this photo. "I just wanted to get a picture of the train and some mountains," said Arkes, an economist who lives in Santa Monica. "I had no idea I'd get that great reflection."
SPORTS
July 1, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world's highest navigable lake lies 12,507 feet high in the Andes on the border between Bolivia and Peru, 110 miles long and 45 miles wide. The Incas named it Titicaca--"the mountain cat and the rock" in their Quechua language--because, according to NASA satellite photos and active imaginations, the shape of the lake resembles a big cat playing with a rock. But how did they know that?
SPORTS
May 27, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Lynne Cox, 35, of Los Alamitos completed another in her series of cold-water goodwill swims by crossing a narrow arm of Lake Titicaca--at 12,507 feet the world's highest lake--from Copacabana, Bolivia, to Pomato, Peru. Water temperature was 58 degrees. She completed the 10-mile swim in 3 hours 48 minutes.
TRAVEL
September 4, 2005
MACHU PICCHU was on Jeremy Arkes' must-see-before-I-die list, so earlier this summer he and six friends traveled to Peru for two weeks. They were on a train from Cusco to Lake Titicaca when he leaned out from the rear car's balcony with his Nikon N80 to snap this photo. "I just wanted to get a picture of the train and some mountains," said Arkes, an economist who lives in Santa Monica. "I had no idea I'd get that great reflection."
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | SARAH GRAHAM, Associated Press
The land where Anton Marcos Ticon raised livestock and grew potatoes, barley and other grains is no longer to be seen. "It's all under water," he said. He pointed toward the place where his home was flushed away by torrential rains and floods that began in January and still rage in an abnormally heavy rainy season around Lake Titicaca, which at 12,000 feet up in the Andes is the world's highest lake. "We lived there back to my great-grandfather's generation. Now you can't see anything."
TRAVEL
August 18, 2013 | Marshall S. Berdan
As anyone who has been to Ecuador's Galapagos knows, a trip to those islands is the journey of a lifetime. But with per-person prices that can start at $3,000, it might have to be a trip of the next lifetime. Fortunately for Galapagos-aspirers like me, my wife and our twin 12-year-old daughters, there are the Ballestas Islands, which are known as the Poor Man's Galapagos. The Ballestas lie just 10 miles off the southern coast of Peru and are easily accessible by boat from Paracas, a small, sun-drenched working port and tourist center.
NEWS
August 10, 2003 | Drew Benson, Associated Press Writer
Viewed from atop a rocky hill beside this remote hamlet, the worn earthen mounds and canals of an ancient farming system that once fed an empire stretch out to the horizon. The method faded out of use a millennium ago. But it has been brought back to life by Indian communities on the plains around Lake Titicaca as a way to protect crops against drought, floods and even frost damage.
TRAVEL
November 26, 2000 | MIKE McINTYRE
I first heard the name Lake Titicaca in my sixth-grade geography class. Once the snickering stopped, most of us thought it would be a cool place to visit. After 32 years, I went to see for myself. It wasn't hard to find. Andrea and I hopped a northbound bus in La Paz, and three hours later we stood on the shore of the lake that legend claims gave birth to the Incas and the sun. Straddling the border of Bolivia and Peru at 12,500 feet, it's one of the highest navigable lakes in the world.
NEWS
February 16, 1997 | LYNN F. MONAHAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Boatman Jorge Chacra cuts his engine and grasps a long pole to push his way through the thick, bright green layer of weed floating on Puno Bay. Just off shore on Lake Titicaca, the lawn-like carpet of tiny aquatic plants looks deceptively natural against the blue sky. Chacra, who earns his living taking tourists to the famous floating reed islands, doesn't want the tangled green mass clogging the engine.
SPORTS
July 1, 1992 | RICH ROBERTS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The world's highest navigable lake lies 12,507 feet high in the Andes on the border between Bolivia and Peru, 110 miles long and 45 miles wide. The Incas named it Titicaca--"the mountain cat and the rock" in their Quechua language--because, according to NASA satellite photos and active imaginations, the shape of the lake resembles a big cat playing with a rock. But how did they know that?
SPORTS
May 27, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Lynne Cox, 35, of Los Alamitos completed another in her series of cold-water goodwill swims by crossing a narrow arm of Lake Titicaca--at 12,507 feet the world's highest lake--from Copacabana, Bolivia, to Pomato, Peru. Water temperature was 58 degrees. She completed the 10-mile swim in 3 hours 48 minutes.
NEWS
August 10, 2003 | Drew Benson, Associated Press Writer
Viewed from atop a rocky hill beside this remote hamlet, the worn earthen mounds and canals of an ancient farming system that once fed an empire stretch out to the horizon. The method faded out of use a millennium ago. But it has been brought back to life by Indian communities on the plains around Lake Titicaca as a way to protect crops against drought, floods and even frost damage.
NEWS
May 18, 1986 | SARAH GRAHAM, Associated Press
The land where Anton Marcos Ticon raised livestock and grew potatoes, barley and other grains is no longer to be seen. "It's all under water," he said. He pointed toward the place where his home was flushed away by torrential rains and floods that began in January and still rage in an abnormally heavy rainy season around Lake Titicaca, which at 12,000 feet up in the Andes is the world's highest lake. "We lived there back to my great-grandfather's generation. Now you can't see anything."
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