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Lake Vostok

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SCIENCE
July 9, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Antarctica's Lake Vostok doesn't seem like the most hospitable home on the planet for any kind of life. Trapped under a glacier 2.3 miles thick, it's subject to extreme pressures, extreme cold, extreme heat (possibly from hydrothermal vents) and lack of light. And yet scientists studying ice cores from the sub-glacial lake have discovered 3,507 distinct genetic fragments indicating a remarkable diversity of life under the ice. The findings, published by the journal PLOS ONE, show that the Antarctic lake -- the largest subglacial lake in the world, and the seventh largest overall in volume -- may be home to a complex ecosystem, and could fuel the hopes of researchers looking for alien life on other worlds, such as Jupiter's icy moon Europa.
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SCIENCE
July 9, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Antarctica's Lake Vostok doesn't seem like the most hospitable home on the planet for any kind of life. Trapped under a glacier 2.3 miles thick, it's subject to extreme pressures, extreme cold, extreme heat (possibly from hydrothermal vents) and lack of light. And yet scientists studying ice cores from the sub-glacial lake have discovered 3,507 distinct genetic fragments indicating a remarkable diversity of life under the ice. The findings, published by the journal PLOS ONE, show that the Antarctic lake -- the largest subglacial lake in the world, and the seventh largest overall in volume -- may be home to a complex ecosystem, and could fuel the hopes of researchers looking for alien life on other worlds, such as Jupiter's icy moon Europa.
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NEWS
September 1, 1996 | Associated Press
A freshwater lake far beneath the ice in Antarctica is about 50% bigger than previously thought, stretching about as large as Lake Ontario, researchers report. Scientists had first detected Lake Vostok about 20 years ago. It's by far the biggest known lake under ice, scientists say in the June 20 issue of the journal Nature. The lake lies under about 2.5 miles of ice. Its water is deep, averaging 400 feet or more, and in some places it is about 1,000 feet deep, the researchers reported.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
At the coldest spot on Earth, Michael Studinger is mapping a world he cannot see. Around him stretches a snow-scape as smooth as a starched shirt, so empty of landmarks that any sense of scale or distance is lost in the white. But hidden miles beneath the icecap on which he stands is a freshwater lake as long as Lake Ontario and as deep as Lake Tahoe--its untouched waters a time capsule from more than a million years ago.
NEWS
March 4, 2001 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
At the coldest spot on Earth, Michael Studinger is mapping a world he cannot see. Around him stretches a snow-scape as smooth as a starched shirt, so empty of landmarks that any sense of scale or distance is lost in the white. But hidden miles beneath the icecap on which he stands is a freshwater lake as long as Lake Ontario and as deep as Lake Tahoe--its untouched waters a time capsule from more than a million years ago.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1996 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British researchers in Antarctica have mapped what may be the most unusual lake in the world--a body of unfrozen fresh water the size of Lake Ontario buried two-and-a-half miles beneath the ice of the coldest spot on Earth. Researchers suspect the unsullied lake water may harbor an ancient trove of living bacteria, viruses and simple plants essentially unchanged for a million years.
NEWS
September 1, 1996 | Associated Press
A freshwater lake far beneath the ice in Antarctica is about 50% bigger than previously thought, stretching about as large as Lake Ontario, researchers report. Scientists had first detected Lake Vostok about 20 years ago. It's by far the biggest known lake under ice, scientists say in the June 20 issue of the journal Nature. The lake lies under about 2.5 miles of ice. Its water is deep, averaging 400 feet or more, and in some places it is about 1,000 feet deep, the researchers reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1996 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British researchers in Antarctica have mapped what may be the most unusual lake in the world--a body of unfrozen fresh water the size of Lake Ontario buried two-and-a-half miles beneath the ice of the coldest spot on Earth. Researchers suspect the unsullied lake water may harbor an ancient trove of living bacteria, viruses and simple plants essentially unchanged for a million years.
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