Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLake Wobegon
IN THE NEWS

Lake Wobegon

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A few months ago, Garrison Keillor went looking for Lake Wobegon, the fictional village he created. And he found it--sort of. Right where he left it. The Minnesota Public Radio storyteller reports on his search in the December issue of National Geographic magazine. For years, Keillor says, people have asked the location of the village where his weekly stories are set, and they seem disappointed when he tells them it is fictional.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
January 5, 2012 | By the Food staff
It takes a lot to get a recipe through our Test Kitchen. We make it again and again, getting it so that it doesn't just work but is the best that it can be. Like the children at Lake Wobegon, all of our recipes are above average. But still, of the more than 300 we published in 2011 — more than most cookbooks — there were some that stood out more than others. And so, as is our tradition, we're bringing back our 10 favorite recipes of 2011 for a curtain call. They're a varied bunch.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1989 | IRV LETOFSKY
In a new 90-minute special--"Lake Wobegon Loyalty Days," showing at 9 p.m. Sunday on the Disney Channel--we find Garrison Keillor in a ribald Viking costume, with a staff topped by a fish. These are the ancient habilaments of the Sons of Knute. He inducts the audience in Minneapolis into the order by reading the sacred creed, concluding with six "oh-yahs" and two snorts, "signifying the clearing of the head."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2007 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
WHAT is it about the works of Garrison Keillor that keeps readers and listeners coming back for more? It's maddeningly impossible for this reader to drive around town on a Saturday afternoon and not tune in to Keillor's radio show, even when I've heard the same tales (or variations of them) countless times before. Especially because I've heard them before.
NEWS
June 7, 1987 | JILL M. SCHULTZ, United Press International
Folks in Lake Wobegon are misty-eyed these days because the humorist who created the mythical town of strong women, good-looking men and above-average children is leaving "A Prairie Home Companion." "I want to enjoy the sweet life in my stories," said Garrison Keillor, who has been the heart and soul of the radio show for 13 years. Keillor, 44, said he wants to return to writing after the final performance of his Peabody Award-winning "A Prairie Home Companion" next Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2007 | Bernadette Murphy, Special to The Times
WHAT is it about the works of Garrison Keillor that keeps readers and listeners coming back for more? It's maddeningly impossible for this reader to drive around town on a Saturday afternoon and not tune in to Keillor's radio show, even when I've heard the same tales (or variations of them) countless times before. Especially because I've heard them before.
BOOKS
October 11, 1987 | Dan Sullivan, Sullivan is The Times' theater critic
In his introduction, written from his new home in Copenhagen, Garrison Keillor recalls his monologues on the Prairie Home Companion radio show as "seances." Exactly, and there must have been some nervousness about committing them to print. But the spell holds. Those who enjoyed hearing the news from Lake Wobegon, Minn.
BOOKS
August 26, 2001 | NOEL PERRIN, Noel Perrin, a professor at Dartmouth, is the author of a dozen books, including "A Reader's Delight" and "Life With an Electric Car."
It is Saturday night in Lake Wobegon, Minn., a town that time has definitely not forgotten. To be sure, Garrison Keillor, who invented the town as the venue for his "A Prairie Home Companion" show on public radio, likes to pretend that Lake Wobegon is quaint and sleepy and sort of innocently Middle Western. But compare it to a town that really is sleepy, such as Thornton Wilder's beloved Grover's Corners, N.H.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Shame-faced confession: I never heard "A Prairie Home Companion." I missed all the enlightenment, all the intellectual stimulation, all the emotional uplift. There the show was, those many years on the radio, and I paid no attention. I must have been too busy doing important things--things like timing hemidemisemiquavers or counting fouettes or reorganizing my socks drawer. Now I feel silly and ashamed. I feel downright un-American.
FOOD
January 5, 2012 | By the Food staff
It takes a lot to get a recipe through our Test Kitchen. We make it again and again, getting it so that it doesn't just work but is the best that it can be. Like the children at Lake Wobegon, all of our recipes are above average. But still, of the more than 300 we published in 2011 — more than most cookbooks — there were some that stood out more than others. And so, as is our tradition, we're bringing back our 10 favorite recipes of 2011 for a curtain call. They're a varied bunch.
BOOKS
August 26, 2001 | NOEL PERRIN, Noel Perrin, a professor at Dartmouth, is the author of a dozen books, including "A Reader's Delight" and "Life With an Electric Car."
It is Saturday night in Lake Wobegon, Minn., a town that time has definitely not forgotten. To be sure, Garrison Keillor, who invented the town as the venue for his "A Prairie Home Companion" show on public radio, likes to pretend that Lake Wobegon is quaint and sleepy and sort of innocently Middle Western. But compare it to a town that really is sleepy, such as Thornton Wilder's beloved Grover's Corners, N.H.
NEWS
November 21, 2000 | From Associated Press
A few months ago, Garrison Keillor went looking for Lake Wobegon, the fictional village he created. And he found it--sort of. Right where he left it. The Minnesota Public Radio storyteller reports on his search in the December issue of National Geographic magazine. For years, Keillor says, people have asked the location of the village where his weekly stories are set, and they seem disappointed when he tells them it is fictional.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1999
What a pleasure to see a front-page headline (Sept. 25) about the perils of using a single test score to make educational decisions! One of the statements most frustrating to teachers is the goal of every child testing at grade level. "Grade level" is a term correctly used to describe a mean test score; that is, half the students tested will score at or above that level and half will score below. If everyone works very hard and improves next year, the test will be normed upward so half test at or above and half below.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He likes to portray himself as meek and mushy, so bland, as he puts it, that he makes linoleum look like great art. But these days, Garrison Keillor has an edge to him. He's taking on Gov. Jesse Ventura. And his radio variety show, "A Prairie Home Companion," normally such a mellow mix, bristles now with insults directed the governor's way: "You have the IQ of a salad bar." "If you were any dumber, we'd have to water you."
NEWS
March 1, 1993 | PAUL FELDMAN and IRIS SCHNEIDER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
If you're picking up half a ton of hog feed from the Acorn Supply Co. on a Saturday, it's best to do it before 2 p.m. Otherwise, you'll have to hopscotch over speaker wire and maneuver through a maze of beat-up guitar, mandolin and fiddle cases, all to the vibrant strains of such chestnuts as "You Are My Sunshine."
NEWS
February 9, 1992 | SHARON BERNSTEIN
Humorist Garrison Keillor has been beguiling radio audiences with his kindly spoof of old-time radio shows since 1974, when his Minnesota-based "Prairie Home Companion" became de rigueur listening among the public radio set. A televised performance of his current New York-based show, "The American Radio Company," which is recorded live in front of an audience, will air as a Valentine's Day special on PBS.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1987
Garrison Keillor kissed off his hometown St. Paul Pioneer Press with a nasty letter to the editor the other day from his new digs in Denmark: "I'm glad to bid you goodbye. People who depend on you for their news have chosen to live a smaller life." He'd long been feuding with the PP, which has printed his address and otherwise took shots at the chronicler of Lake Wobegon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1987
Ever since "Prairie Home Companion's" Garrison Keillor packed up his Powdermilk Biscuits last month, public radio has been in quandary as to who will take his place. I have a solution. Oliver North. For two hours every Saturday night Keillor hosted a show full of inoffensive, heartwarming music, interspersed with sentimental tales of a fictitious American small town called Lake Wobegon. North has been sitting before a congressional committee for hours a day, spinning equally sentimental tales of a fictitious Central American country called Nicaragua and a fantasyland he refers to as Iran.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | MARTIN BERNHEIMER, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
Shame-faced confession: I never heard "A Prairie Home Companion." I missed all the enlightenment, all the intellectual stimulation, all the emotional uplift. There the show was, those many years on the radio, and I paid no attention. I must have been too busy doing important things--things like timing hemidemisemiquavers or counting fouettes or reorganizing my socks drawer. Now I feel silly and ashamed. I feel downright un-American.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1989 | IRV LETOFSKY
In a new 90-minute special--"Lake Wobegon Loyalty Days," showing at 9 p.m. Sunday on the Disney Channel--we find Garrison Keillor in a ribald Viking costume, with a staff topped by a fish. These are the ancient habilaments of the Sons of Knute. He inducts the audience in Minneapolis into the order by reading the sacred creed, concluding with six "oh-yahs" and two snorts, "signifying the clearing of the head."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|