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Laker Guard Byron Scott

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SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | SAM McMANIS
Laker guard Byron Scott, bothered by several uncommon injuries and ailments this season, missed practice Tuesday because of an infection caused by an ingrown toenail on his right foot. Scott, averaging 21.3 points in the playoffs, had part of the nail on his big toe removed during an examination Tuesday at Centinela Hospital Medical Center in Inglewood. The Lakers said he will be examined again before tonight's game to determine if he can play. Trainer Gary Vitti said the infection caused tenderness and Scott had difficulty running.
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SPORTS
July 12, 1990 | DAVID RAATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Morningside High phenomenon Stais Boseman is the first to admit that his basketball style is a bit on the flashy side. He knows he doesn't have to do a fancy reverse dunk whenever he gets a breakaway. He just enjoys it. "I like to dunk with authority whenever I can," the 6-foot-3 Boseman said. "I love to get my teammates enthused with a great dunk. "I try to get the crowd going and to intimidate the other team." But, make no mistake; despite his flair for theatrics, Boseman is a serious player.
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SPORTS
June 6, 1989 | SAM McMANIS
Laker guard Byron Scott strained his left hamstring in practice Monday and is questionable for Game 1 of the National Basketball Assn. championship series tonight against the Detroit Pistons. Scott, the Lakers' third-leading playoff scorer, is expected to be examined today by team doctors Robert Kerlan and Stephen Lombardo. He left practice early and returned to the team's hotel, where he received periodic ice treatments throughout the day, according to Laker spokesman Josh Rosenfeld.
SPORTS
February 21, 1990 | SAM McMANIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Told by his coach merely to "float," basically a euphemism for staying out of the way, Laker guard Byron Scott naturally gravitated to his favorite spot beyond the three-point line and waited for his teammates to take notice. There were only 7.7 seconds left in overtime, and the Lakers trailed the San Antonio Spurs by two points. The options, as prescribed by Coach Pat Riley, did not include Scott.
SPORTS
May 20, 1989 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Sun worshipers, they are not. But no longer do the Lakers simply dismiss the Phoenix Suns as merely a nuisance. Not after spending most of the regular season unsuccessfully trying to make them go away. The Lakers say they are not surprised that the Suns are challenging them in the National Basketball Assn.'s Western Conference title series, which begins today at 12:30 in the Forum. As persistent as they are productive, the Suns unexpectedly emerged from the depths of the Pacific Division this past season and seriously challenged the Lakers as early as December.
SPORTS
June 12, 1989 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
This series has been a boon for people who sell electrical impulse stimulators, the gizmos that are supposed to speed up the healing process by keeping the blood circulating in an injured area. Laker guard Byron Scott has practically been married to one since suffering a torn left hamstring while practicing the day before Game 1. Now, it's Piston forward Dennis Rodman who can't leave home without it, thanks to upper back spasms. Rodman took it a step further. After playing well again in Game 3--19 rebounds and 12 points in 28 minutes--he spent the next 30 minutes or so on the trainer's table on his stomach.
SPORTS
June 9, 1989 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
As its name implies, the probe--a medical device that shoots jolts of electricity into an injured area--is not the most pain-free treatment for Laker guard Byron Scott's partially torn left hamstring. In fact, judging from Scott's gnashing of teeth during treatment, you might be tempted to view it more as torture than treatment. But the probe's effects in hastening healing might be the only way to get Scott into the National Basketball Assn. championship series. Scott is also receiving heat and ice treatments, as well as mild electrical stimulation of his left hamstring.
SPORTS
May 28, 1985 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Without question, the best shot that Laker guard Byron Scott made here Monday afternoon came early in the third quarter after the Boston Celtics had built a comfortable 27-point lead over the Lakers in Game 1 of the National Basketball Assn. championship series. When Danny Ainge, who had tormented Scott and the Lakers most of the game, had his back turned from the basket, Scott delivered a forearm shot that struck Ainge on the back of the head.
SPORTS
February 21, 1990 | SAM McMANIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Told by his coach merely to "float," basically a euphemism for staying out of the way, Laker guard Byron Scott naturally gravitated to his favorite spot beyond the three-point line and waited for his teammates to take notice. There were only 7.7 seconds left in overtime, and the Lakers trailed the San Antonio Spurs by two points. The options, as prescribed by Coach Pat Riley, did not include Scott.
SPORTS
July 12, 1990 | DAVID RAATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Morningside High phenomenon Stais Boseman is the first to admit that his basketball style is a bit on the flashy side. He knows he doesn't have to do a fancy reverse dunk whenever he gets a breakaway. He just enjoys it. "I like to dunk with authority whenever I can," the 6-foot-3 Boseman said. "I love to get my teammates enthused with a great dunk. "I try to get the crowd going and to intimidate the other team." But, make no mistake; despite his flair for theatrics, Boseman is a serious player.
SPORTS
June 12, 1989 | SCOTT HOWARD-COOPER, Times Staff Writer
This series has been a boon for people who sell electrical impulse stimulators, the gizmos that are supposed to speed up the healing process by keeping the blood circulating in an injured area. Laker guard Byron Scott has practically been married to one since suffering a torn left hamstring while practicing the day before Game 1. Now, it's Piston forward Dennis Rodman who can't leave home without it, thanks to upper back spasms. Rodman took it a step further. After playing well again in Game 3--19 rebounds and 12 points in 28 minutes--he spent the next 30 minutes or so on the trainer's table on his stomach.
SPORTS
June 9, 1989 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
As its name implies, the probe--a medical device that shoots jolts of electricity into an injured area--is not the most pain-free treatment for Laker guard Byron Scott's partially torn left hamstring. In fact, judging from Scott's gnashing of teeth during treatment, you might be tempted to view it more as torture than treatment. But the probe's effects in hastening healing might be the only way to get Scott into the National Basketball Assn. championship series. Scott is also receiving heat and ice treatments, as well as mild electrical stimulation of his left hamstring.
SPORTS
June 6, 1989 | SAM McMANIS
Laker guard Byron Scott strained his left hamstring in practice Monday and is questionable for Game 1 of the National Basketball Assn. championship series tonight against the Detroit Pistons. Scott, the Lakers' third-leading playoff scorer, is expected to be examined today by team doctors Robert Kerlan and Stephen Lombardo. He left practice early and returned to the team's hotel, where he received periodic ice treatments throughout the day, according to Laker spokesman Josh Rosenfeld.
SPORTS
May 20, 1989 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Sun worshipers, they are not. But no longer do the Lakers simply dismiss the Phoenix Suns as merely a nuisance. Not after spending most of the regular season unsuccessfully trying to make them go away. The Lakers say they are not surprised that the Suns are challenging them in the National Basketball Assn.'s Western Conference title series, which begins today at 12:30 in the Forum. As persistent as they are productive, the Suns unexpectedly emerged from the depths of the Pacific Division this past season and seriously challenged the Lakers as early as December.
SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | SAM McMANIS
Laker guard Byron Scott, bothered by several uncommon injuries and ailments this season, missed practice Tuesday because of an infection caused by an ingrown toenail on his right foot. Scott, averaging 21.3 points in the playoffs, had part of the nail on his big toe removed during an examination Tuesday at Centinela Hospital Medical Center in Inglewood. The Lakers said he will be examined again before tonight's game to determine if he can play. Trainer Gary Vitti said the infection caused tenderness and Scott had difficulty running.
SPORTS
May 28, 1985 | SAM McMANIS, Times Staff Writer
Without question, the best shot that Laker guard Byron Scott made here Monday afternoon came early in the third quarter after the Boston Celtics had built a comfortable 27-point lead over the Lakers in Game 1 of the National Basketball Assn. championship series. When Danny Ainge, who had tormented Scott and the Lakers most of the game, had his back turned from the basket, Scott delivered a forearm shot that struck Ainge on the back of the head.
SPORTS
February 21, 1987
I was looking through my dictionary the other day, when I came across Webster's definition of the word choke . It showed a picture of Laker guard Byron Scott in a big game. Last Sunday, against Boston, Byron did his usual disappearing act before a sellout crowd and national audience. Maybe Jerry West should have kept Frank Brickowski and traded Scott. KEVIN WOO Torrance
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