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SPORTS
May 8, 1993
If the Lakers' franchise lasts for another thousand years, people will say, "This was their finest hour." JERRY COWLE Pacific Palisades
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SPORTS
April 6, 2013 | Helene Elliott
Vin Scully is luring us back to the Dodgers with wonderful old stories and the promise of a new season, and the Angels will introduce new acquisition Josh Hamilton to their home fans Tuesday, but winter sports haven't relaxed their hold on us just yet. Sunday is rivalry day in Southern California, a gift from the schedule makers of the NBA and the NHL. It's enough to keep us indoors when summer sports are trying to draw us out into the sunshine....
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SPORTS
June 21, 1986
Being a new subscriber to Dodgervision, I was appalled to see various commercial spots between innings. The Lakers and Kings televised many of their home games on Prime Ticket at no additional charge to cable subscribers, thus advertising was needed to cover their costs. It's pure greed when we pay $5.95 per game and still are subjected to commercials. The Dodgers should either follow the example of the Lakers and Kings and make these telecasts available at no charge to cable subscribers, or eliminate the advertising.
SPORTS
March 3, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Jerry Buss brought 10 championships to Los Angeles with the Lakers and along the way he altered the way people experience professional sports. "He changed the whole way that we went to a game: the Laker Girls, the whole fan experience, A-list people on the floor, the whole thing," Magic Johnson said. "Dr. Buss is the reason why the NBA is thriving the way it is. " When Buss purchased the Lakers (along with the Kings and the Forum) in 1979 for $67.5 million, he had a very specific vision.
OPINION
August 30, 1987
The Times front page coverage of the agreement for the move of the Raiders to Irwindale came as no surprise to those of us who watched the bungling Coliseum Commission send the Lakers and Kings off to Inglewood. Oh well. Maybe the Coliseum can be used for the Olympics in 20 years or so. Meanwhile the commissioners might attract the annual motocross if they bring in all that dirt--and if they leave the dirt year round, it'd be a good place for Coliseum President Alexander Haagen to bury his arrogance.
SPORTS
December 25, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
In an unusual broadcast, Prime Ticket network plans to show both the Kings' and Lakers' games Saturday night on a split telecast, the Southern California-based cable company announced Tuesday. The Kings will play the Edmonton Oilers at Edmonton in an NHL game that is expected to end about eight minutes into the Laker-Portland Trail Blazer game at the Forum. Prime Ticket officials said they will provide a split telecast for as long as both games are under way.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1997
Re "Council Endorses Deal to Build Sports Arena," Jan. 16: Do I understand this correctly? The taxpayers of Los Angeles are going to shell out $170 million ($6.8 million per year for 25 years) so that the owners of the Lakers and Kings can have 150 luxury box seats and 2,500 club seats on which they can make a large profit? The Inglewood City Council members were not so fooled. They only proposed an $85-million giveaway ($35 million to help construct and a $2-million-per-year lease that they would give to the Lakers and Kings are for a $1-per-year fee for 25 years)
SPORTS
August 30, 1997
How can so few continue to negatively affect so many? First, both the L.A. City Council and the Coliseum Commission, with their inept legacy of losing teams and promoting the antiquated Coliseum as a legitimate facility, are doing their best to keep the NFL out of Southern California. Now another out-of-touch councilman, Joel Wachs, is doing his best to scrap plans for a state-of-the-art arena for the Lakers and Kings. A new arena for downtown L.A. would economically revitalize the area, generate civic pride, and provide fans with the kind of venue that can increase attendance and enhance the experience of taking in a game (see the Anaheim Pond)
OPINION
February 16, 2003
Re "Players at Indian Slots Have No Clue on Payout," Feb. 10: I am appalled! Experts say that $60 is the average daily loss for California casino patrons. What a waste. Those same patrons would scream bloody murder if their taxes were increased by that amount. Even $60 a month would be a big help to aid schools, health care, homeless people and many other needy causes. But, no, it's more fun to play the slots and lose it all. Stupid! Maxine Trevethen Torrance I find it amazing that The Times takes issue with the casino ownership of a Women's National Basketball Assn.
SPORTS
October 26, 2002 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Through a rivalry recently turned nasty, the Lakers and Sacramento Kings hadn't actually hit each other in the mouth, but now that last bit of decorum is gone too. Two minutes and seven seconds into Friday night's exhibition game at Staples Center, Rick Fox fought King guard Doug Christie twice, once on the floor and again in a tunnel leading to the Kings' locker room.
SPORTS
May 17, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
A quick peek inside the Forum reveals nothing. It looks as if the Lakers and Kings never left -- at least until you look up and realize that the hulking scoreboard that once hung from the ceiling is no longer there. Neither are the Lakers and Kings, of course. They moved out a decade ago, trading in their cozier, funkier fixer-upper for the newer, gaudier Staples Center.
OPINION
February 16, 2003
Re "Players at Indian Slots Have No Clue on Payout," Feb. 10: I am appalled! Experts say that $60 is the average daily loss for California casino patrons. What a waste. Those same patrons would scream bloody murder if their taxes were increased by that amount. Even $60 a month would be a big help to aid schools, health care, homeless people and many other needy causes. But, no, it's more fun to play the slots and lose it all. Stupid! Maxine Trevethen Torrance I find it amazing that The Times takes issue with the casino ownership of a Women's National Basketball Assn.
SPORTS
October 26, 2002 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
Through a rivalry recently turned nasty, the Lakers and Sacramento Kings hadn't actually hit each other in the mouth, but now that last bit of decorum is gone too. Two minutes and seven seconds into Friday night's exhibition game at Staples Center, Rick Fox fought King guard Doug Christie twice, once on the floor and again in a tunnel leading to the Kings' locker room.
SPORTS
May 6, 2001 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Now that airport authorities have been tipped, the Sacramento Kings can only hope for someone other than the Toronto Raptors as an NBA finals foe. Customs, and all. Meantime, since having their senses of humor tested, the Kings, a once-laughable franchise, get another shot at "the big boys," as Chris Webber recently called the Lakers. Should this be easy for the Lakers? Does it look easy?
SPORTS
August 30, 1997
How can so few continue to negatively affect so many? First, both the L.A. City Council and the Coliseum Commission, with their inept legacy of losing teams and promoting the antiquated Coliseum as a legitimate facility, are doing their best to keep the NFL out of Southern California. Now another out-of-touch councilman, Joel Wachs, is doing his best to scrap plans for a state-of-the-art arena for the Lakers and Kings. A new arena for downtown L.A. would economically revitalize the area, generate civic pride, and provide fans with the kind of venue that can increase attendance and enhance the experience of taking in a game (see the Anaheim Pond)
NEWS
April 7, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jack Kent Cooke, a onetime traveling encyclopedia salesman who scrapped to become a billionaire media and real estate tycoon and an irascible but unforgettable sports impresario here and in the nation's capital, died Sunday of a heart attack in Washington, D.C. He was 84. As an owner of pro basketball, football and hockey teams, Cooke reigned over the Los Angeles Lakers' first National Basketball Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1997
Re "Council Endorses Deal to Build Sports Arena," Jan. 16: Do I understand this correctly? The taxpayers of Los Angeles are going to shell out $170 million ($6.8 million per year for 25 years) so that the owners of the Lakers and Kings can have 150 luxury box seats and 2,500 club seats on which they can make a large profit? The Inglewood City Council members were not so fooled. They only proposed an $85-million giveaway ($35 million to help construct and a $2-million-per-year lease that they would give to the Lakers and Kings are for a $1-per-year fee for 25 years)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1995
Re "Why Not Give the Coliseum to USC?" Commentary, Nov. 20: I was certainly surprised to see the subhead, "L.A.'s white elephant needs a landlord that can put it to good use," on Frank del Olmo's commentary. I believe some writer said that about the Sports Arena when the Forum was built to take the Lakers and Kings to Inglewood in 1968. Now, almost 30 years later, the Sports Arena has retained USC basketball, secured the Los Angeles Clippers, the IHL Ice Dogs, hosts capacity Latin music events, as well as record-setting concerts by Bruce Springsteen, U2, Madonna, Billy Joel, etc.--and the Kings and Lakers are again looking for a new state-of-the-art arena.
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