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TRAVEL
September 12, 1999 | COLETTE O'BRIEN, Colette O'Brien is a freelance writer in Mill Valley, Calif
The old steamboat appeared on the horizon, smoke rising from its single red stack to dust the sky. It would take away another batch of families and the leftovers from their summer as "cottagers" here on the Muskoka lakes. From across the water a lone loon called. An answer followed. It was early morning on the lake. The water was flat, a perfect mirror for the blue sky and the trees' fall colors that flashed across the surface like dancing flames, yellow, orange, crimson.
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SPORTS
December 6, 2009 | Staff And Wire Reports
Lindsey Vonn won a World Cup downhill for the second straight day, giving her seven victories on the Lake Louise, Canada, course since 2004. Saturday's victory marked the first time the 25-year-old Vonn has won two downhills in two days at Lake Louise. The U.S. Ski Team said it was the best overall showing for American women in a World Cup downhill since March 16, 1991, at Vail, Colo. Alice McKennis -- a 20-year-old in her third career World Cup race -- finished 10th, Stacey Cook 11th, Julia Mancuso 12th, Leanne Smith 23rd and Chelsea Marshall 25th.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1999
Cold Snap That Lasted 200 to 400 Years Two vast glacial lakes that long ago gushed out of what is now northern Canada into the North Atlantic caused the most abrupt cold snap of the past 10,000 years, researchers at the University of Colorado in Boulder report in today's Nature. They estimate that more than 1 trillion cubic meters of water drained from the Agassiz and Ojibway lakes in the Hudson Bay region about 8,200 years ago, when a natural ice dam burst.
TRAVEL
September 12, 1999 | COLETTE O'BRIEN, Colette O'Brien is a freelance writer in Mill Valley, Calif
The old steamboat appeared on the horizon, smoke rising from its single red stack to dust the sky. It would take away another batch of families and the leftovers from their summer as "cottagers" here on the Muskoka lakes. From across the water a lone loon called. An answer followed. It was early morning on the lake. The water was flat, a perfect mirror for the blue sky and the trees' fall colors that flashed across the surface like dancing flames, yellow, orange, crimson.
TRAVEL
February 2, 1992 | JESSICA MAXWELL, Maxwell is a free-lance travel, food and environmental writer who lives in a log cabin on an island in Washington state. and
You know it's True Love if you're willing to strap five-foot boards to your feet and throw yourself down icy cliffs in a blizzard just for the fun of it. Personally, I never would have learned to ski if I hadn't been hopelessly hooked on someone who was hopelessly hooked on the most addictive white crystal known to man . . . snow. Any fool can see that skiing is dangerous. Whenever you combine speed and slipperiness you're in trouble--just ask a poodle on a waxed floor.
SPORTS
December 6, 2009 | Staff And Wire Reports
Lindsey Vonn won a World Cup downhill for the second straight day, giving her seven victories on the Lake Louise, Canada, course since 2004. Saturday's victory marked the first time the 25-year-old Vonn has won two downhills in two days at Lake Louise. The U.S. Ski Team said it was the best overall showing for American women in a World Cup downhill since March 16, 1991, at Vail, Colo. Alice McKennis -- a 20-year-old in her third career World Cup race -- finished 10th, Stacey Cook 11th, Julia Mancuso 12th, Leanne Smith 23rd and Chelsea Marshall 25th.
NEWS
October 19, 1986 | DICK RORABACK, Times Staff Writer
We suspected it, of course, and reveled in it. Even bragged about it. But most of us never knew why. Now we know; now, with no fear of contradiction, we can shout it from the house tops--or from the patio chaise longue, whichever comes first: Southern California has the best weather in the world! Like most of us in Southern California, the man is from out of state--in his case New Hampshire.
NEWS
August 21, 1995 | From Associated Press
Two weary Spanish climbers wept Sunday as they told of their ordeal on the world's second-highest mountain, a climb that killed seven mountaineers, including Alison Hargreaves of Britain. Lorenzo Ortas Pont and Jose Antonio (Pepe) Garces--leader of the five-member Spanish expedition--were overcome with emotion as they limped off the plane that brought them from Pakistan's extreme northern region. Speaking briefly through an interpreter, they said brutal winds plagued their climb of K2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 1989
Politically, clean air is nearly always turbulent air. The current effort to rewrite the Clean Air Act is no exception, but there is a diplomatic dimension that is not always present in domestic legislation. After years of waiting for action by the United States to dilute the acid rain that is stripping away Canada's forests and killing life in its lakes, Canada has a right to expect that something now will be done.
SPORTS
September 2, 2003 | John Weyler
Golfer Jay Haas, who turns 50 in December, has been defying age and shooting past many of the game's younger set this year. He was fifth at the PGA Championship -- his seventh top-10 finish of the year -- and he already has earned a career-high $2.29 million, 10th on the season money list. "My new first name is '49-year-old' and it doesn't bother me one bit," Haas told the Tampa (Fla.) Tribune. Last week, Jack Nicklaus made Haas a captain's choice for the U.S. President's Cup team.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1999
Cold Snap That Lasted 200 to 400 Years Two vast glacial lakes that long ago gushed out of what is now northern Canada into the North Atlantic caused the most abrupt cold snap of the past 10,000 years, researchers at the University of Colorado in Boulder report in today's Nature. They estimate that more than 1 trillion cubic meters of water drained from the Agassiz and Ojibway lakes in the Hudson Bay region about 8,200 years ago, when a natural ice dam burst.
TRAVEL
February 2, 1992 | JESSICA MAXWELL, Maxwell is a free-lance travel, food and environmental writer who lives in a log cabin on an island in Washington state. and
You know it's True Love if you're willing to strap five-foot boards to your feet and throw yourself down icy cliffs in a blizzard just for the fun of it. Personally, I never would have learned to ski if I hadn't been hopelessly hooked on someone who was hopelessly hooked on the most addictive white crystal known to man . . . snow. Any fool can see that skiing is dangerous. Whenever you combine speed and slipperiness you're in trouble--just ask a poodle on a waxed floor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2010 | By Jill Leovy
They're nearly always pregnant, like the mythical tribbles of "Star Trek" fame. They pass through gullets of fish unfazed. And they could bring disaster to native bugs, frogs and steelhead restoration efforts in the Santa Monica Mountains. New Zealand mudsnails have taken over four watersheds in the Santa Monica Mountains and are spreading fast, expanding from the first confirmed sample in Medea Creek in Agoura Hills to nearly 30 other stream sites in four years. The invasive species, found in many waterways in the U.S. West, the Great Lakes and Canada, reproduces asexually, so "it just takes one to infest a water body," said Mark Abramson, a stream restoration expert for the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Commission.
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After three full days back in orbit, John Glenn turned reflective Sunday, saying that gazing out the shuttle Discovery's windows at vast and recognizable chunks of Earth from 350 miles in space has served to strengthen his faith. Asked whether he prayed in space, Glenn replied: "I pray every day, and I think everybody should. I don't think we can look at Earth every day--to look out at this kind of creation and not believe in God is, to me, impossible."
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