Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLamb
IN THE NEWS

Lamb

FOOD
August 27, 2008 | S. Irene Virbila
I opened a bottle of Atalayas de Golban the other night to have with a rack of lamb. The combination of Tinto Fino (the local Tempranillo) and lamb is classic and sublime. And this Ribera del Duero from Madrid wine merchant Miguel Sanchez and winemaker Bertrand Sourdais is a beauty. The grapes come from Sanchez's second property, Atalayas de Golban (his first is Dominio de Atauta -- famous and much more expensive). Atalayas comes in at a terrific price for such a graceful and irresistible Ribera del Duero.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2000
What a delight to open the Calendar section and discover that Lamb Chop lives ("Lamb Chop, the Next Generation," by Dana Calvo, June 4). Hurrah! I hope Mallory Lewis finds a means to restore her and Hush Puppy and Charlie Horse to the children (and adults) who love them. MARNEE DOWNING Northridge I was afraid that Lamb Chop died with Shari Lewis and was set aside. I am glad to hear that she jumped with 118 women in a cancer-reseach fund-raiser that set a skydiving record, proof that she is back!
FOOD
April 15, 2009 | S. Irene Virbila
When I tasted this wine and then looked at the price, the two didn't match up. This gorgeous and elegant red from Terra de Verema in the Vilella Baixa del Priorat region of Spain could easily cost twice the price. Instead, for about $30, you get a stunning Carinyena (Carignan) with a touch of Garnacha and Syrah. Spicy and lush, the 2006 Triumvirat is beautifully balanced, even elegant. And it's smooth as silk, almost Burgundian in style.
FOOD
October 28, 2009 | Miles Clements
The Koranic art at Mutiara Food & Market is rattling against the wall, its filigreed details shaken by the groans of a jet passing overhead. When the plane travels out of sight, Mutiara fills with a consuming quiet. The Inglewood restaurant and market is a subdued place, but its unassuming setting belies its rich and varied Burmese and Malaysian cooking. Mutiara concentrates mostly on the halal highlights of Islamic Burmese cuisine, a hearty cast of curries and kebabs more closely resembling those of India and Pakistan than Myanmar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Willis e. lamb jr., whose elegant demonstration of a small energy difference between two excited states of the hydrogen atom laid the foundation for the application of quantum theory to electromagnetism, producing the modern field of quantum electrodynamics, has died. He was 94. Lamb, who was awarded the 1955 Nobel Prize in physics for his work, died May 15 of a gallstone disorder at University Medical Center in Tucson. "He was a real giant in the field," said James C. Wyant, dean of the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, where Lamb spent the last years of his career.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Freekeh -- it's the grain pronounced free-ka and in Aramaic means "the rubbed one," a reference to rubbing off the roasted husk to reveal the grain, still green because it has to be harvested when young. The rubbed one is the loved one: Described as a cousin to bulgur wheat and native to Lebanon , Jordan, Syria and Egypt, it's the latest hip superfood showing up on menus such as at Jessica Koslow's Sqirl Cafe in Silver Lake.  Koslow serves her freekeh with pickled blueberries, chanterelles and goat cheese.
FOOD
July 1, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The fatit hummus at Olive Tree is a dish of geological depth, a dip of distinct strata. Slicked across its top is a layer of yogurt puddled with olive oil and dusted with cumin and paprika. Pine nuts dot the surface like pale pebbles. Embedded in the warm hummus below are fragments of crunchy pita. It's an elaborate rendition of the Middle Eastern meze , but not an untraditional one. At Olive Tree, the fatit hummus is both staple and symbol, representative of a certain kind of detailed and familial Levantine cooking lost among the monotony of low-cost shwarma shacks.
FOOD
February 4, 2010
There's nothing I don't like about this Tempranillo from a bodega founded just over a decade ago by a group of Spanish wine lovers. What a beauty for less than $15. It's ripe and luscious with soft tannins, a taste of cherries and a youthful lilt of acidity. This is totally pleasurable drinking from central Spain. The grapes are organic, by the way, and even the label is printed on recycled paper. But in the end, what matters is flavor -- and this young Tempranillo has it in spades.
FOOD
April 9, 1987 | Bert Greene, Greene is a New-York based food writer
The coming holiday of Easter is a time when a cook needs a good butcher's advice. In these days of packaged meat and automated sales help, it is harder to find a butcher willing to dispense wisdom about cuts of meat in a supermarket. My advice is to buy a good book on the subject. And learn, once and for all, whether the cut of lamb in the display case is a saddle, chuck or bracelet. More important, what is the difference in price and cooking time?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|