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Lamb

FOOD
February 4, 2010
There's nothing I don't like about this Tempranillo from a bodega founded just over a decade ago by a group of Spanish wine lovers. What a beauty for less than $15. It's ripe and luscious with soft tannins, a taste of cherries and a youthful lilt of acidity. This is totally pleasurable drinking from central Spain. The grapes are organic, by the way, and even the label is printed on recycled paper. But in the end, what matters is flavor -- and this young Tempranillo has it in spades.
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FOOD
July 21, 2011 | By Bill Esparza, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At David Padilla and Maria Ramos' Oaxacan restaurant Gish Bac, the weekends are made for goat and lamb barbecue. A third-generation barbacoa specialist, Ramos began learning the trade of goat and lamb barbecue as a 10-year-old in Oaxaca's Sunday market in Tlacolula — one of Mexico's longest-running markets — where her family still operates a stand. The couple came to Los Angeles in 1992 and immediately began catering private events. This went on until a year ago, when a growing chorus of requests from attendees at these gatherings demanded more regular access to Ramos' barbacoa . Padilla and Ramos found a restaurant location in the heart of Mid-City, and Gish Bac (roughly, "from Tlacolula")
FOOD
July 1, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The fatit hummus at Olive Tree is a dish of geological depth, a dip of distinct strata. Slicked across its top is a layer of yogurt puddled with olive oil and dusted with cumin and paprika. Pine nuts dot the surface like pale pebbles. Embedded in the warm hummus below are fragments of crunchy pita. It's an elaborate rendition of the Middle Eastern meze , but not an untraditional one. At Olive Tree, the fatit hummus is both staple and symbol, representative of a certain kind of detailed and familial Levantine cooking lost among the monotony of low-cost shwarma shacks.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Sheri Linden
For her first stint in the director's chair, "Juno" screenwriter Diablo Cody has concocted a modern-day "Alice Through the Looking Glass," with none of the danger or wit. "Paradise" follows a home-schooled, Jesus-loving Montana lass who loses her faith and heads to Sin City to experience the corrupting power of real life. The not-so-wild ride is essentially sappy, however much of Cody's self-consciously barbed dialogue its characters are forced to utter. As the symbolically named Lamb, Julianne Hough is sweetly intent on a firsthand encounter with "your basic abominations.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 2000
What a delight to open the Calendar section and discover that Lamb Chop lives ("Lamb Chop, the Next Generation," by Dana Calvo, June 4). Hurrah! I hope Mallory Lewis finds a means to restore her and Hush Puppy and Charlie Horse to the children (and adults) who love them. MARNEE DOWNING Northridge I was afraid that Lamb Chop died with Shari Lewis and was set aside. I am glad to hear that she jumped with 118 women in a cancer-reseach fund-raiser that set a skydiving record, proof that she is back!
FOOD
April 1, 2009 | S. Irene Virbila
A giant figure on the wine scene in Australia's Barossa Valley, Dave Powell makes a whole slew of terrific wines, but my favorite has to be "The Steading." The name is a term for the collection of barns, stables and outbuildings on a farm. Taste the 2006 and its wallop of fruit, layers of spice and plums and dark berries, along with its depth and complexity, pull you right in.
FOOD
October 28, 2009 | Miles Clements
The Koranic art at Mutiara Food & Market is rattling against the wall, its filigreed details shaken by the groans of a jet passing overhead. When the plane travels out of sight, Mutiara fills with a consuming quiet. The Inglewood restaurant and market is a subdued place, but its unassuming setting belies its rich and varied Burmese and Malaysian cooking. Mutiara concentrates mostly on the halal highlights of Islamic Burmese cuisine, a hearty cast of curries and kebabs more closely resembling those of India and Pakistan than Myanmar.
FOOD
March 31, 2011 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Among food-obsessed Angelenos, shawarma isn't as much a point of contention as, say, ramen or carne asada . At too many of the city's Levantine restaurants, flaccid, flavorless strands of meat pass as properly shaved shawarma almost without protest. But there are few pleasures as hypnotic as flame-licked shawarma . Behold the spit stacked with lamb or beef or chicken spinning in slow, mesmerizing circles, flecks of caramelized fat basting the meat below. In deft hands, even the bluntest knife will shear the meat as if carving clay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Willis e. lamb jr., whose elegant demonstration of a small energy difference between two excited states of the hydrogen atom laid the foundation for the application of quantum theory to electromagnetism, producing the modern field of quantum electrodynamics, has died. He was 94. Lamb, who was awarded the 1955 Nobel Prize in physics for his work, died May 15 of a gallstone disorder at University Medical Center in Tucson. "He was a real giant in the field," said James C. Wyant, dean of the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, where Lamb spent the last years of his career.
NEWS
January 18, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Freekeh -- it's the grain pronounced free-ka and in Aramaic means "the rubbed one," a reference to rubbing off the roasted husk to reveal the grain, still green because it has to be harvested when young. The rubbed one is the loved one: Described as a cousin to bulgur wheat and native to Lebanon , Jordan, Syria and Egypt, it's the latest hip superfood showing up on menus such as at Jessica Koslow's Sqirl Cafe in Silver Lake.  Koslow serves her freekeh with pickled blueberries, chanterelles and goat cheese.
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