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October 28, 2009 | Miles Clements
The Koranic art at Mutiara Food & Market is rattling against the wall, its filigreed details shaken by the groans of a jet passing overhead. When the plane travels out of sight, Mutiara fills with a consuming quiet. The Inglewood restaurant and market is a subdued place, but its unassuming setting belies its rich and varied Burmese and Malaysian cooking. Mutiara concentrates mostly on the halal highlights of Islamic Burmese cuisine, a hearty cast of curries and kebabs more closely resembling those of India and Pakistan than Myanmar.
May 22, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Willis e. lamb jr., whose elegant demonstration of a small energy difference between two excited states of the hydrogen atom laid the foundation for the application of quantum theory to electromagnetism, producing the modern field of quantum electrodynamics, has died. He was 94. Lamb, who was awarded the 1955 Nobel Prize in physics for his work, died May 15 of a gallstone disorder at University Medical Center in Tucson. "He was a real giant in the field," said James C. Wyant, dean of the College of Optical Sciences at the University of Arizona, where Lamb spent the last years of his career.
April 9, 1987 | Bert Greene, Greene is a New-York based food writer
The coming holiday of Easter is a time when a cook needs a good butcher's advice. In these days of packaged meat and automated sales help, it is harder to find a butcher willing to dispense wisdom about cuts of meat in a supermarket. My advice is to buy a good book on the subject. And learn, once and for all, whether the cut of lamb in the display case is a saddle, chuck or bracelet. More important, what is the difference in price and cooking time?
August 29, 1991
I'm thrilled the paper chose to put a "vegetarian" section in last Thursday (Aug. 15). However, I was shocked to read at the bottom of your article that you suggested a dish to be served with roast lamb or veal. One doesn't need meat to complement a meal, especially since the whole article dealt with vegetarian food; but even more surprising is to suggest a meal complement that is the inhumanely treated animal--a veal calf! And coincidentally, the lamb has the second slowest tortuous death.
June 2, 2012 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
First of all, Black Hogg, the name of the new Silver Lake gastropub, doesn't refer to a heritage pig or even a plain old hog or wild boar. According to the staff, it takes its name from the alternative definition of hogg, which the Oxford English Dictionary says refers to a young sheep, especially "one from the time it ceases to be a lamb until its first shearing"). And there that hogg is, ambiguous in neon outline at the very top of the restaurant's understated sign. A subliminal suggestion to order the buttery lamb burger?
April 17, 2008
Regarding "The Gastro Economist: Glendale, the Kebab's Home Away From Home" [March 13]: One you didn't include is Elena's Greek Armenian Cuisine on Glendale Boulevard, which serves mouth-watering lamb kebab plates under 10 bucks. An added bonus is the taped Greek and Armenian music playing in the background. David Tulanian Los Angeles
March 31, 2011 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Among food-obsessed Angelenos, shawarma isn't as much a point of contention as, say, ramen or carne asada . At too many of the city's Levantine restaurants, flaccid, flavorless strands of meat pass as properly shaved shawarma almost without protest. But there are few pleasures as hypnotic as flame-licked shawarma . Behold the spit stacked with lamb or beef or chicken spinning in slow, mesmerizing circles, flecks of caramelized fat basting the meat below. In deft hands, even the bluntest knife will shear the meat as if carving clay.
June 16, 2011 | By Linda Burum, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Life at Kabab Grill revolves not, as its name suggests, around a grill for its kebabs but around an imposing stone oven. The 4-by-6-foot custom-made behemoth dominates the open kitchen at this otherwise modest 2-month-old cafe in Palms. "Last week we roasted a whole stuffed lamb in it for someone's party," owner Firas Tar, who comes from Syria, tells a customer, clearly proud of his oven's prowess. But whole roast lamb isn't on the daily menu at Kabab Grill. The oven's cardinal purpose is to bake safeeha , a thin Syrian-style flatbread loaded with savory toppings.
January 18, 2013 | By Betty Hallock
Freekeh -- it's the grain pronounced free-ka and in Aramaic means "the rubbed one," a reference to rubbing off the roasted husk to reveal the grain, still green because it has to be harvested when young. The rubbed one is the loved one: Described as a cousin to bulgur wheat and native to Lebanon , Jordan, Syria and Egypt, it's the latest hip superfood showing up on menus such as at Jessica Koslow's Sqirl Cafe in Silver Lake.  Koslow serves her freekeh with pickled blueberries, chanterelles and goat cheese.
March 17, 1992
I'm a veteran of World War II, and I want to comment on your article. Lamb's article is well written in the scope he chose, but I believe his scope is too narrow. In order to understand what propelled us into Vietnam to fight a war we need to go back as far as the end of World War II. Following World War II there was a feeling in our country and other countries we considered friends that communism had advanced to a threatening position. It is not my intent here to recite the story in detail.
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