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Lamine Zeroual

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January 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
A secretive army-backed committee named Algeria's hard-line defense minister as president Sunday, tightening the military's control of the country. The High Security Council named Lamine Zeroual to a three-year term. He takes office today, succeeding a five-man, military-backed committee that took power two years ago. The new president is supposed to be a transitional figure who will lead the country back to democracy.
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NEWS
January 31, 1994 | From Associated Press
A secretive army-backed committee named Algeria's hard-line defense minister as president Sunday, tightening the military's control of the country. The High Security Council named Lamine Zeroual to a three-year term. He takes office today, succeeding a five-man, military-backed committee that took power two years ago. The new president is supposed to be a transitional figure who will lead the country back to democracy.
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NEWS
August 21, 1994 | From Reuters
About 15,000 people have been made homeless by an earthquake in northwestern Algeria, with the death toll up to at least 171, the government said Saturday. Two days after the first shocks hit, rescuers were still searching the rubble for survivors. A statement by the Algerian Interior Ministry quoted by Algiers Radio put the number of injured at 289, of which 176 were still hospitalized. Nearly 500 homes were devastated by the quake, which hit the Mascara district Thursday and measured 5.6.
OPINION
February 13, 1994 | Robin Wright and Robin Wright, a former Mideast correspondent, is the author of "Sacred Rage: The Wrath of Militant Islam."
As the world scrambles on Bosnia, too late to help 200,000 killed, another crisis looms ever larger across the Mediterranean in Algeria. The signs, by all accounts, are more than ominous. By twilight, the labyrinthine streets of the seaside capital and its legendary casbah are bare due to both fear and a curfew. Gunfire erratically pierces the night. Dawn usually reveals one or more bodies, often with throats slit--a tactic adopted by both Islamic militants and pro-government death squads.
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