Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLamp Village Shelter
IN THE NEWS

Lamp Village Shelter

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's mid-morning at the LAMP Village Linen Service on Skid Row and workers already have tackled several loads of linens and towels from nearby hotels. Clad in royal blue smocks, the employees work in a series of cavernous, light, airy rooms with shiny new equipment. Fifty-pound washers and dryers whir away, and several brown plastic bags stand on a table, filled with laundered blankets ready for pick up by a Hollywood shelter.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994
The Department of Housing and Urban Development has awarded $112,080 to LAMP, which operates a shelter on Los Angeles' Skid Row that houses, feeds and employs the mentally ill homeless, it was announced this week. LAMP plans to hire three staffers to work in the parks, missions, shelters and encampments on Skid Row to encourage the mentally ill to come into LAMP's shelter, said Executive Director Mollie Lowery.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 1994
The Department of Housing and Urban Development has awarded $112,080 to LAMP, which operates a shelter on Los Angeles' Skid Row that houses, feeds and employs the mentally ill homeless, it was announced this week. LAMP plans to hire three staffers to work in the parks, missions, shelters and encampments on Skid Row to encourage the mentally ill to come into LAMP's shelter, said Executive Director Mollie Lowery.
NEWS
January 22, 1991 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's mid-morning at the LAMP Village Linen Service on Skid Row and workers already have tackled several loads of linens and towels from nearby hotels. Clad in royal blue smocks, the employees work in a series of cavernous, light, airy rooms with shiny new equipment. Fifty-pound washers and dryers whir away, and several brown plastic bags stand on a table, filled with laundered blankets ready for pick up by a Hollywood shelter.
NEWS
November 21, 1999 | JULIE MARQUIS and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For California's most severely ill mental patients, the price of consistent care is too often a trip to the precipice of catastrophe. At a time when medicine has more to offer than ever before, when more than ever is known about how comprehensive services can keep them safe and stable, many severely mentally ill people in this state are lucky if they can just stay alive. One man, the much-loved son of middle-class parents, calls himself a "walking miracle."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|