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SCIENCE
November 30, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun
The bright orange flames of kerosene wick lamps used in millions of impoverished households around the world are significant sources of global warming and pollutants linked to respiratory diseases, according to a new study. Lab and field work led by researchers at UC Berkeley and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign showed that 7% to 9% of the kerosene consumed by the crude burners is converted to black carbon -- a 20-fold increase over previous estimates, the study published online this month in the journal Environmental Science & Technology said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 2014 | By Bob Pool
A monthlong mystery over who illuminated the big grin on Simi Valley's Happy Face Hill has been solved: Two sisters, ages 3 and 7, did it. "They wanted to surprise me because they knew how much I love the happy face," said their mother, Allison Robertson of Simi Valley. Robertson is a business administration student at Moorpark College who tries to do her studying on weekends. Her husband, Doug, takes Tabitha and Evelyn on Saturday jaunts to give her some peace when she hits the books.
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NEWS
December 28, 2013 | By Jeffrey Head
George Nelson's 1952 Bubble lamps are icons of Midcentury Modernism, arguably some of the most enduring designs of the era. But now that famed illumination, so soft and diffuse, finds itself in the harsh spotlight of one the year's most interesting design disputes. The George Nelson Foundation, which in court documents describes itself as a nonprofit "dedicated to preserving the legacy of Mr. Nelson," filed a trademark infringement lawsuit in May against Los Angeles-based Modernica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 2014 | By Bob Pool
Steve Apostolof had a frown on his face as he drove past Happy Face Hill. The hillside features a 150-foot-wide smiley face that was created in 1998 by a man armed with a weed-whacker and a sprayer of herbicide. Since then, it has become something of a curiosity piece that welcomes motorists on the 118 Freeway to Simi Valley. But in the January dusk, Apostolof couldn't see Happy Face Hill, let alone its enormous grin. "With the sun setting early, the hill was pitch-black," Apostolof said of his trip home from work.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Modernica, maker of those beloved George Nelson Bubble lamps, announced that it is bringing back the Bubble's cousin, the Net. In 1959, the Net Light rolled out to not exactly a fervor. Fewer than 1,000 of the lights were produced before the design slipped into midcentury obscurity. Helping the design's chances for a comeback this time around is a ready market of Nelson devotees and midcentury design fans looking for something a bit different from the now-ubiquitous Bubble. Whereas the Bubble lamps take their shape from metal skeletons, the Net silhouette emerges when fine netting is stretched over a series of metal rings.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1985 | KATHLEEN DAY
Executives at Toys R Us, the national toy chain, R mad that the centerpiece of their company's logo appears in other retailers' names. So, Toys R Us lawyers have fired off dozens of angry letters in recent years to tell people to quit using the "R," and they've taken several companies to court to force removal of the letter.
HOME & GARDEN
January 17, 1998 | RALPH KOVEL and TERRY KOVEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Early lights for the home were candle flames or fuel-burning lamps. When the electric light was invented, a new type of lamp could be designed. A closed lampshade was possible because there was no flame and relatively little heat. In the early 1900s, when Arts and Crafts and mission styles were popular, lamps were made to blend with the heavy, straight, oak furniture. Box-like wooden columns or iron, copper or pottery bases were preferred.
HOME & GARDEN
February 27, 2010
Finding fixtures and lamps for period-influenced interiors can be just as important as choosing the furniture. "The biggest misconception I hear is that ‘I can't afford period lighting,' " Lara Spencer says. "But the truth is you can find really nice vintage fixtures for the same as or not much less than some mass-market reproductions if you just know where to look." She thinks of lighting as the "jewelry" that finishes a room — "a fun way to make a big statement," she says.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
It took torrential rainfalls to show 20th century archaeologists that a 2,000-year-old trove of gold might be buried at Vani, an ancient city in western Georgia. Serious explorations began in the late 1930s and subsequent excavations revealed a series of graves containing fabulous jewelry, elaborately ornamented garments and beautifully crafted statuary and functional wares.
HOME & GARDEN
April 2, 2010 | Jenn Garbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's Sunday morning, and David Hrobowski is rearranging the breakfast pastries in a corner of MorYork Gallery in Highland Park. "Even this has to be just so," he says, shifting a banana that serves as the dividing line between slices of pumpkin and zucchini bread. "It's like my popsicle stuff." The "popsicle stuff" in question are frozen dessert sticks, thousands of them, glued together one by one to construct spiraling 3-foot-tall table legs and lampshades finished in the most improbable fringe.
NEWS
December 28, 2013 | By Jeffrey Head
George Nelson's 1952 Bubble lamps are icons of Midcentury Modernism, arguably some of the most enduring designs of the era. But now that famed illumination, so soft and diffuse, finds itself in the harsh spotlight of one the year's most interesting design disputes. The George Nelson Foundation, which in court documents describes itself as a nonprofit "dedicated to preserving the legacy of Mr. Nelson," filed a trademark infringement lawsuit in May against Los Angeles-based Modernica.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Alex Calderwood, a co-founder of the idiosyncratic Ace Hotel chain where hip patrons mingle amid reclaimed furnishings, died Thursday in London. He was 47. Calderwood's company announced his death on its website but gave no further details. The company's statement called him "our teacher, mentor, guru and most importantly our dear friend. " The Ace - a name chosen, Calderwood told interviewers, because it represents both the high and the low in a deck of cards - draws tourists in Seattle, Portland, Ore., New York, Palm Springs and London.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
ATHENS - Locals called Pittaki Street a "public toilet. " Drug addicts and petty criminals frequented the narrow lane, steps from a popular plaza where tourists exploring Greece angle for shots of the looming Acropolis. The scraggle of remaining residents kept to themselves. Graffiti and broken windows adorned grimy walls. Two dimly illuminating streetlights dangled overhead. "It was a very nasty place where you didn't want to live," Stephania Xydia said as she stood looking down the avenue's 200 feet, dusk spilling over the rooftops.
NEWS
October 10, 2013 | By Craig Nakano
Modernica, maker of those beloved George Nelson Bubble lamps, announced that it is bringing back the Bubble's cousin, the Net. In 1959, the Net Light rolled out to not exactly a fervor. Fewer than 1,000 of the lights were produced before the design slipped into midcentury obscurity. Helping the design's chances for a comeback this time around is a ready market of Nelson devotees and midcentury design fans looking for something a bit different from the now-ubiquitous Bubble. Whereas the Bubble lamps take their shape from metal skeletons, the Net silhouette emerges when fine netting is stretched over a series of metal rings.
NEWS
September 3, 2013 | By Lisa Boone
The lava lamp celebrates its 50th birthday Tuesday, and though it's more kitsch than classic design, the piece remains just as memorable as mid-century furnishings from Eames, Noguchi and Saarinen.  British inventor Edward Craven Walker designed the lava lamp in 1963 after he spotted an intriguing oil-and-water egg timer at a pub.  "Because it was so completely new, we had to convince people it was worth going with, particularly when it...
NEWS
May 11, 2013 | By Judi Dash
The Yo Lamp is a little battery-powered task light with a flexible 18-inch arm that winds out of and back into a yo yo-like 3.5-inch-diameter by 1.5-inch-thick plastic base. Uncoil all 18 inches, or just some, and bend the arm for the illumination you want. This is more a spotlight than a lamp, but the beam is bright, the on-off push button is easy, and the base comes in shiny blue, green or fuchsia as well as black or white. It runs on three AAA batteries (not included) or the included USB cable.
AUTOS
January 3, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Subaru on Thursday announced that it was recalling 633,842 vehicles to check for a problem with a fuse in a puddle light that could short-circuit and lead to a fire. The move affects Subaru Legacy and Outbacks made in 2010 and 2011, Tribeca models made from 2006 to 2012, and Forester models made from 2009 to 2012. The company believes that only 54,000 vehicles are actually equipped with the small accessory lamps under the side of the vehicle, said Subaru spokesman Michael McHale.
NEWS
June 9, 1985 | ROBERT STONE
Before the invention of the electric light bulb about a century or so, natural gas and oil lamps had been the standard methods of lighting homes in this country. And before rural households had enough of these lamps to provide adequate light, there were three methods of illumination: candles, long-burning pine knots in the fireplace, and a crude implement known as the grease lamp. As a source of light, grease lamps had their origin in the ancient world; for centuries, they were common in Europe.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Jacques-Philippe Piverger, 35, went from a finance career to the head of a company hoping to bring light to the darkest places. The chief executive and co-founder of Mpowerd was at CES this week demonstrating the Luci solar lantern, designed for campers, eco-devotees and people caught in disaster scenarios -- such as a hurricane. About 3.1 billion people live with little or no access to energy, Piverger said. The Luci lamp, manufactured in Asia, is a transparent cylinder that weighs four ounces.
AUTOS
January 3, 2013 | By David Undercoffler
Subaru on Thursday announced that it was recalling 633,842 vehicles to check for a problem with a fuse in a puddle light that could short-circuit and lead to a fire. The move affects Subaru Legacy and Outbacks made in 2010 and 2011, Tribeca models made from 2006 to 2012, and Forester models made from 2009 to 2012. The company believes that only 54,000 vehicles are actually equipped with the small accessory lamps under the side of the vehicle, said Subaru spokesman Michael McHale.
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