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Lancaster Ca Budget

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER
The Lancaster City Council has voted to adopt a $27.7-million city budget for the 1992-1993 fiscal year that will result in the layoffs of nine city workers and the elimination of eight other vacant jobs, the first layoffs in the city's nearly 15-year history. City Manager Jim Gilley attributed the cuts, which will reduce the city's work force from 245 to 228 people, to the recession and businesses in nearby Palmdale attracting more shoppers and resulting sales tax revenues.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Lancaster Community Shelter will have its city funding slashed nearly 25%, but spending for most other municipal services will grow modestly in the coming year under a budget adopted by the Lancaster City Council. In its unanimous approval Monday of the 1995-96 budget, which covers the fiscal year beginning July 1, the Lancaster City Council reduced annual funding for the homeless shelter from $117,000 to $90,000.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This city's proposed budget for next fiscal year will increase by only 2.8%, but city officials said that increase is a welcome indication that the area's long-awaited economic turnaround is at hand. "We look at it as being a healthy sign," Gary Hill, the city's finance director, said Tuesday. "California is coming out of the recession, and Lancaster is along with it. We did see a little growth last year. We're looking at more growth in the coming year."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This city's proposed budget for next fiscal year will increase by only 2.8%, but city officials said that increase is a welcome indication that the area's long-awaited economic turnaround is at hand. "We look at it as being a healthy sign," Gary Hill, the city's finance director, said Tuesday. "California is coming out of the recession, and Lancaster is along with it. We did see a little growth last year. We're looking at more growth in the coming year."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council approved an operating budget for the coming fiscal year of $28.7-million--almost identical to the current budget. But because law enforcement spending has been boosted by 7% in the new budget, some departments--including public works, which will have to lay off four employees--will be taking cuts. The total share going to law enforcement and community safety programs is $10.6 million, primarily for police services provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials unveiled a proposed 1994-95 budget Wednesday that calls for the layoff of four employees and a boost in law enforcement spending, but no significant change in other city services. Lancaster's general fund expenditures, covering day-to-day city operations, would total $28.7 million, up just $22,600 from last year. "We're basically calling it a budget to maintain the same service levels as we've had in the past," said Dennis Davenport, assistant city manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1995 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Lancaster Community Shelter will have its city funding slashed nearly 25%, but spending for most other municipal services will grow modestly in the coming year under a budget adopted by the Lancaster City Council. In its unanimous approval Monday of the 1995-96 budget, which covers the fiscal year beginning July 1, the Lancaster City Council reduced annual funding for the homeless shelter from $117,000 to $90,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents from the outskirts of the Antelope Valley urged Los Angeles County officials to spare their area's proposed cuts in fire stations, library services and a local park stemming from the county's budget crisis. Nearly 200 people turned out Tuesday night for the fourth and last in a series of public hearings held by Supervisor Mike Antonovich, who represents the Antelope Valley, on the impacts of a potential $1.6-billion county budget shortfall for the coming fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The City Council approved an operating budget for the coming fiscal year of $28.7-million--almost identical to the current budget. But because law enforcement spending has been boosted by 7% in the new budget, some departments--including public works, which will have to lay off four employees--will be taking cuts. The total share going to law enforcement and community safety programs is $10.6 million, primarily for police services provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City officials unveiled a proposed 1994-95 budget Wednesday that calls for the layoff of four employees and a boost in law enforcement spending, but no significant change in other city services. Lancaster's general fund expenditures, covering day-to-day city operations, would total $28.7 million, up just $22,600 from last year. "We're basically calling it a budget to maintain the same service levels as we've had in the past," said Dennis Davenport, assistant city manager.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Residents from the outskirts of the Antelope Valley urged Los Angeles County officials to spare their area's proposed cuts in fire stations, library services and a local park stemming from the county's budget crisis. Nearly 200 people turned out Tuesday night for the fourth and last in a series of public hearings held by Supervisor Mike Antonovich, who represents the Antelope Valley, on the impacts of a potential $1.6-billion county budget shortfall for the coming fiscal year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER
The Lancaster City Council has voted to adopt a $27.7-million city budget for the 1992-1993 fiscal year that will result in the layoffs of nine city workers and the elimination of eight other vacant jobs, the first layoffs in the city's nearly 15-year history. City Manager Jim Gilley attributed the cuts, which will reduce the city's work force from 245 to 228 people, to the recession and businesses in nearby Palmdale attracting more shoppers and resulting sales tax revenues.
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