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Lancaster Ca Economy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, economist Ron Halcrow had some bad news for Palmdale and Lancaster, the dusty desert towns that had become two of California's fastest growing cities almost overnight. At the northern edge of Los Angeles County, where dozens of spanking-new housing tracts had sprouted in the old alfalfa fields during the mid- to late 1980s, he saw dark clouds on the horizon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, economist Ron Halcrow had some bad news for Palmdale and Lancaster, the dusty desert towns that had become two of California's fastest growing cities almost overnight. At the northern edge of Los Angeles County, where dozens of spanking-new housing tracts had sprouted in the old alfalfa fields during the mid- to late 1980s, he saw dark clouds on the horizon.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months ago, staring at a big vacancy in the city's major shopping center and with a national pet supplies chain talking about coming to town, Lancaster officials decided to offer a public-money subsidy to close the deal--and it worked. After the city offered the Phoenix-based PetsMart chain a redevelopment subsidy of up to $187,500 spread over 7 1/2 years, the company picked Lancaster for its new outlet. So the city gets a new business, new jobs and a big new sales tax generator.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, city officials in Lancaster held a triumphant news conference to announce that ex-astronaut Gordon Cooper, enthused by a $300,000 gift from the city, was relocating his Van Nuys aviation business to the Antelope Valley, the first venture lured by a vigorous business recruitment program. Last week, however, Cooper was still unable to get additional private financing he needed to fund the venture, so he could not even make lease payments on a never-used hangar in Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite criticism from residents who said the city should not subsidize retail stores, the Lancaster City Council has unanimously approved a $7.3-million deal to aid construction of a new Price/Costco store. At their meeting Monday, council members said they feared that without the financial help, the warehouse chain might build another store in Palmdale and drain off sales tax dollars that are needed to support city services in Lancaster.
BUSINESS
June 14, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, city officials in Lancaster held a triumphant news conference to announce that ex-astronaut Gordon Cooper, enthused by a $300,000 gift from the city, was relocating his Van Nuys aviation business to the Antelope Valley, the first venture lured by a vigorous business recruitment program. Last week, however, Cooper was still unable to get additional private financing he needed to fund the venture, so he could not even make lease payments on a never-used hangar in Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite criticism from residents who said the city should not subsidize retail stores, the Lancaster City Council has unanimously approved a $7.3-million deal to aid construction of a new Price/Costco store. At their meeting Monday, council members said they feared that without the financial help, the warehouse chain might build another store in Palmdale and drain off sales tax dollars that are needed to support city services in Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three months ago, staring at a big vacancy in the city's major shopping center and with a national pet supplies chain talking about coming to town, Lancaster officials decided to offer a public-money subsidy to close the deal--and it worked. After the city offered the Phoenix-based PetsMart chain a redevelopment subsidy of up to $187,500 spread over 7 1/2 years, the company picked Lancaster for its new outlet. So the city gets a new business, new jobs and a big new sales tax generator.
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