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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of a local arts organization took possession Thursday of a historic building complex that narrowly escaped demolition by the city twice in the past decade. In a brief ceremony, Lancaster City Council members praised the Antelope Valley Allied Arts Assn. for agreeing to buy, occupy and restore the Cedar Avenue complex, which once housed the community's sheriff's station and government offices.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A community group is trying to purchase the city's oldest existing fire station to preserve as a museum. In recent years, the former Fire Station 33, built in 1939, has been used as an art gallery. But Juanita Crothers, who ran the gallery, died last year, and her widower has offered to sell it to local history buffs if they can raise the money. "Every time we tell somebody else about it, they share the excitement," said Los Angeles County Fire Capt. Michael Singer, a proponent of the project.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing a boost for preservationists, the state Historical Resources Commission voted Friday to recommend a group of Lancaster's oldest surviving civic buildings be listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The state commission's 7-0 vote means federal officials will probably make the final decision within two months on the register listing for Lancaster's Art Deco-style Cedar Avenue complex, a cluster of five downtown buildings built between 1920 and 1938.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of a local arts organization took possession Thursday of a historic building complex that narrowly escaped demolition by the city twice in the past decade. In a brief ceremony, Lancaster City Council members praised the Antelope Valley Allied Arts Assn. for agreeing to buy, occupy and restore the Cedar Avenue complex, which once housed the community's sheriff's station and government offices.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1990
The city of Lancaster is creating an "Aerospace Walk of Honor" to recognize Edwards Air Force Base test pilots, whose ranks have included such legendary fliers as Chuck Yeager and former astronaut Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio). Next month, city officials will launch the project by unveiling five granite monuments along Lancaster Boulevard honoring five distinguished pilots. The tribute is modeled after the Hollywood Walk of Fame and celebrity walks elsewhere.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1993
The Art Deco-style Cedar Avenue Complex, which includes five buildings that are among the oldest in Lancaster, has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district. The downtown complex, its buildings constructed between 1920 and 1938, was listed in the register following months of community effort to save the city-owned structures, which earlier this year were considered by the City Council for demolition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A community group is trying to purchase the city's oldest existing fire station to preserve as a museum. In recent years, the former Fire Station 33, built in 1939, has been used as an art gallery. But Juanita Crothers, who ran the gallery, died last year, and her widower has offered to sell it to local history buffs if they can raise the money. "Every time we tell somebody else about it, they share the excitement," said Los Angeles County Fire Capt. Michael Singer, a proponent of the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit arts group in the Antelope Valley has offered to purchase or lease a historic downtown auditorium from the city of Lancaster with plans to restore the building for gallery space and offices for community groups. Members of the Antelope Valley Allied Arts Assn., a group that sponsors an annual arts festival and awards scholarships in the area, wants to take control of the two-story Memorial Hall at the southwest corner of Lancaster Boulevard and Cedar Avenue.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone in the aeronautics community knew they had the right stuff, and now the city of Lancaster has made it official. Chuck Yeager, Jimmy Doolittle, A. Scott Crossfield, Tony LeVier and Pete Knight--pilots who achieved dizzying heights in the early days of flight testing--became the first Saturday to be honored in Lancaster's Aerospace Walk of Honor. "They're sure a different breed of cat from the rest of us," said George Root, vice mayor of Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is hardly the Louvre, but a group of Antelope Valley artists are setting up a temporary gallery in a vacant Lancaster appliance store with the hope that holiday sales will help them buy and restore a permanent home. The nonprofit Antelope Valley Allied Arts Assn. is negotiating with Lancaster officials to buy the historic Art Deco-style Cedar Avenue Complex, which last month was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1993 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is hardly the Louvre, but a group of Antelope Valley artists are setting up a temporary gallery in a vacant Lancaster appliance store with the hope that holiday sales will help them buy and restore a permanent home. The nonprofit Antelope Valley Allied Arts Assn. is negotiating with Lancaster officials to buy the historic Art Deco-style Cedar Avenue Complex, which last month was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 1993
The Art Deco-style Cedar Avenue Complex, which includes five buildings that are among the oldest in Lancaster, has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places as a historic district. The downtown complex, its buildings constructed between 1920 and 1938, was listed in the register following months of community effort to save the city-owned structures, which earlier this year were considered by the City Council for demolition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nonprofit arts group in the Antelope Valley has offered to purchase or lease a historic downtown auditorium from the city of Lancaster with plans to restore the building for gallery space and offices for community groups. Members of the Antelope Valley Allied Arts Assn., a group that sponsors an annual arts festival and awards scholarships in the area, wants to take control of the two-story Memorial Hall at the southwest corner of Lancaster Boulevard and Cedar Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Providing a boost for preservationists, the state Historical Resources Commission voted Friday to recommend a group of Lancaster's oldest surviving civic buildings be listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The state commission's 7-0 vote means federal officials will probably make the final decision within two months on the register listing for Lancaster's Art Deco-style Cedar Avenue complex, a cluster of five downtown buildings built between 1920 and 1938.
NEWS
September 23, 1990 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Everyone in the aeronautics community knew they had the right stuff, and now the city of Lancaster has made it official. Chuck Yeager, Jimmy Doolittle, A. Scott Crossfield, Tony LeVier and Pete Knight--pilots who achieved dizzying heights in the early days of flight testing--became the first Saturday to be honored in Lancaster's Aerospace Walk of Honor. "They're sure a different breed of cat from the rest of us," said George Root, vice mayor of Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 1990
The city of Lancaster is creating an "Aerospace Walk of Honor" to recognize Edwards Air Force Base test pilots, whose ranks have included such legendary fliers as Chuck Yeager and former astronaut Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio). Next month, city officials will launch the project by unveiling five granite monuments along Lancaster Boulevard honoring five distinguished pilots. The tribute is modeled after the Hollywood Walk of Fame and celebrity walks elsewhere.
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