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Lancaster Ca Politics

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An unsuccessful candidate for the Lancaster City Council who vigorously protested a city franchise agreement with a trash-hauling company pleaded guilty Monday to disturbing the peace, his latest legal scrape since he dumped a load of trash on the front counter at City Hall. Paul Malone, 65, who has tried to make trash collection a citywide issue, was originally accused of making a terrorist threat. In an agreement with prosecutors, the charge was reduced to misdemeanor disturbing the peace.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1994 | SHARON MOESER and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The managers of a city-owned mobile-home park resigned Thursday, saying they were told to avoid enforcing rules so that park residents would not get angry with council members seeking reelection next week. "They're trying to avoid upsetting the people so they can get their votes," said Dale Gillman, who until Thursday managed Brierwood Mobile Home Estates with his wife, Judi. Irvine-based Newport Pacific Capital Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1990 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles County fire captain may be unable to get on the ballot for the Lancaster City Council because his home at the time he filed for candidacy was too far from his mailbox--outside the city. The would-be candidate, Michael Singer, presented a Superior Court commissioner with a novel legal question Monday: Was he a Lancaster resident because his mailbox lay within the city, even though his mobile home, situated a half-mile away, was outside the city limits?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An unsuccessful candidate for the Lancaster City Council who vigorously protested a city franchise agreement with a trash-hauling company pleaded guilty Monday to disturbing the peace, his latest legal scrape since he dumped a load of trash on the front counter at City Hall. Paul Malone, 65, who has tried to make trash collection a citywide issue, was originally accused of making a terrorist threat. In an agreement with prosecutors, the charge was reduced to misdemeanor disturbing the peace.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster, once a sleepy desert outpost, is now a city of 100,000 with a burden of big city problems--drugs, the homeless, overdevelopment, corruption, crowded schools and even gangs. But just when it seemed that Lancaster had confronted all the usual metropolitan woes comes a new one: Art wars. Lancaster's first attempt to institute a public art program to put donated paintings in city-owned buildings has broken down amid battles over who controls the program and chooses the art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1994 | SHARON MOESER and PHIL SNEIDERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The managers of a city-owned mobile-home park resigned Thursday, saying they were told to avoid enforcing rules so that park residents would not get angry with council members seeking reelection next week. "They're trying to avoid upsetting the people so they can get their votes," said Dale Gillman, who until Thursday managed Brierwood Mobile Home Estates with his wife, Judi. Irvine-based Newport Pacific Capital Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 13, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster, once a sleepy desert outpost, is now a city of 100,000 with a burden of big city problems--drugs, the homeless, overdevelopment, corruption, crowded schools and even gangs. But just when it seemed that Lancaster had confronted all the usual metropolitan woes comes a new one: Art wars. Lancaster's first attempt to institute a public art program to put donated paintings in city-owned buildings has broken down amid battles over who controls the program and chooses the art.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 27, 1990 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles County fire captain may be unable to get on the ballot for the Lancaster City Council because his home at the time he filed for candidacy was too far from his mailbox--outside the city. The would-be candidate, Michael Singer, presented a Superior Court commissioner with a novel legal question Monday: Was he a Lancaster resident because his mailbox lay within the city, even though his mobile home, situated a half-mile away, was outside the city limits?
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