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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1994 | ISAAC GUZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a boom town still trying to find its way after a storm of development, Lancaster is attempting to save its most abundant Joshua tree site from illegal dumpers, off-road vehicle enthusiasts and the bulldozers of builders. With the recent purchase of five acres of land, the city is halfway toward reaching its goal of creating a 95-acre woodland preserve, a high desert oasis in the middle of expanding suburbia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1994 | ISAAC GUZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A boom town still trying to find its way after a storm of development, Lancaster is attempting to save its most abundant Joshua tree site from illegal dumpers, off-road vehicle enthusiasts and the bulldozers of developers. With the purchase last week of five new acres of land, the city is halfway toward reaching its goal of creating a 95-acre woodland preserve, a high desert oasis in the middle of expanding suburbia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster has taken the first step toward creating a 30-acre Joshua tree preserve on the city's west side by purchasing 22.5 acres from a developer for $1.1 million, city officials said Thursday. In coming months, the city plans to fence the land bought from developer Joseph Rivani. The city also hopes to install some parking and buy the remaining 7.5 acres from three other owners, city Parks Director Lyle Norton said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1994 | ISAAC GUZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a boom town still trying to find its way after a storm of development, Lancaster is attempting to save its most abundant Joshua tree site from illegal dumpers, off-road vehicle enthusiasts and the bulldozers of builders. With the recent purchase of five acres of land, the city is halfway toward reaching its goal of creating a 95-acre woodland preserve, a high desert oasis in the middle of expanding suburbia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1994 | ISAAC GUZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A boom town still trying to find its way after a storm of development, Lancaster is attempting to save its most abundant Joshua tree site from illegal dumpers, off-road vehicle enthusiasts and the bulldozers of developers. With the purchase last week of five new acres of land, the city is halfway toward reaching its goal of creating a 95-acre woodland preserve, a high desert oasis in the middle of expanding suburbia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster officials, faced with allegations that the City Council has been violating the state's open meetings law, promised Wednesday that the council will make future real estate decisions in public and reveal the prices paid. The decision came after The Times reported Saturday that the council voted behind closed doors last month to authorize purchase of downtown-area properties and did not reveal what it planned to pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Lancaster, departing from common government practice, did not appraise 22.5 acres of land it purchased recently from an investor and ended up paying 45% more than he had paid three years ago. Lancaster officials contend they were not required to get an appraisal and even say the city got a good deal. But city critics have questioned the price, and officials at other government agencies said they believe state law almost always requires appraisals, in part to safeguard public funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster officials, faced with allegations that the City Council has been violating the state's open meetings law, promised Wednesday that the council will make future real estate decisions in public and reveal the prices paid. The decision came after The Times reported Saturday that the council voted behind closed doors last month to authorize purchase of downtown-area properties and did not reveal what it planned to pay.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The city of Lancaster, departing from common government practice, did not appraise 22.5 acres of land it purchased recently from an investor and ended up paying 45% more than he had paid three years ago. Lancaster officials contend they were not required to get an appraisal and even say the city got a good deal. But city critics have questioned the price, and officials at other government agencies said they believe state law almost always requires appraisals, in part to safeguard public funds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lancaster has taken the first step toward creating a 30-acre Joshua tree preserve on the city's west side by purchasing 22.5 acres from a developer for $1.1 million, city officials said Thursday. In coming months, the city plans to fence the land bought from developer Joseph Rivani. The city also hopes to install some parking and buy the remaining 7.5 acres from three other owners, city Parks Director Lyle Norton said.
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