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Lancaster Ca Taxes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Council members have voted to impose a new library services fee on property owners for one year and let voters decide whether to maintain the fee beyond that time. The library charges will be added to property tax bills if the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors votes to set up a proposed assessment district after an Aug. 30 public hearing.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a bold, new front in the "big box" war. Lancaster is so desperately clinging to tax revenue that it is considering giving up nearly five acres of the city's signature park and cutting down 100 trees to get a bigger, better Costco in the high desert. Hemmed in on all sides by competitors, Costco says it will soon close an older store and abandon the town if it doesn't get a new, prime location--Lancaster City Park.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time you read this, the Lancaster City Council probably will already have met today. The council members, city attorney, manager and clerk--who normally meet at 7 p.m. on the first and third Mondays of the month--had to meet at 5:45 a.m. to beat a deadline and enable Lancaster to collect $68,000 in new redevelopment taxes next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999
The city of Lancaster reported collecting $2.35 million in sales taxes in the third quarter of 1998, an increase of 6.5% from the same quarter last year. General consumer goods accounted for 29% of the revenues, an increase of 4.1% from July to September 1998 over the same period in 1997. Auto sales and leases produced 12.6% more in taxes, and restaurants and hotels 3.9%. Hotel bed tax receipts increased 26% over third quarter 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992
To beat a legal deadline for a revenue program, the Lancaster City Council was to meet before dawn today. Members of the City Council and the city attorney, manager and clerk--who usually meet at 7 p.m. on the first and third Mondays of each month--had to meet at 5:45 a.m. to enable Lancaster to collect $68,000 in new redevelopment taxes next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antelope Valley residents will face continued danger from flooding for years to come because voters opted to create their own flood-control agency and defeated a Lancaster flood-control tax measure, officials said Wednesday. The defeat of the Lancaster measure in Tuesday's election means that the city will not get millions of extra dollars each year to build more flood-control projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER
Lancaster residents in June will be asked to approve an annual tax of $25 per house to pay for flood control projects that city officials promise will prevent severe flooding such as occurred last month. The City Council voted 5 to 0 Monday night to place the measure on the June 2 ballot after watching a videotape of residents paddling down flooded streets in inflatable rafts during last month's heavy rains. The measure will require a majority vote to pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1999
The city of Lancaster reported collecting $2.35 million in sales taxes in the third quarter of 1998, an increase of 6.5% from the same quarter last year. General consumer goods accounted for 29% of the revenues, an increase of 4.1% from July to September 1998 over the same period in 1997. Auto sales and leases produced 12.6% more in taxes, and restaurants and hotels 3.9%. Hotel bed tax receipts increased 26% over third quarter 1997.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER and AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Antelope Valley residents, some still mopping up from the region's worst rain-induced flood in recent memory, will get a chance to vote June 2 on what steps they think feuding government officials should take to solve the problem. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved an advisory measure that will ask all Antelope Valley voters to pick from among three general flood control options.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's a bold, new front in the "big box" war. Lancaster is so desperately clinging to tax revenue that it is considering giving up nearly five acres of the city's signature park and cutting down 100 trees to get a bigger, better Costco in the high desert. Hemmed in on all sides by competitors, Costco says it will soon close an older store and abandon the town if it doesn't get a new, prime location--Lancaster City Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 17, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
City Council members have voted to impose a new library services fee on property owners for one year and let voters decide whether to maintain the fee beyond that time. The library charges will be added to property tax bills if the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors votes to set up a proposed assessment district after an Aug. 30 public hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
Trustees of the 12,275-student Lancaster School District have proposed levying a school tax on future residential and commercial development in the district, hoping to raise more money for new facilities than through the state's current developer fee program. The district's board of trustees voted 5 to 0 Tuesday night to pursue the formation of a Mello-Roos district to tax future development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
By the time you read this, the Lancaster City Council probably will already have met today. The council members, city attorney, manager and clerk--who normally meet at 7 p.m. on the first and third Mondays of the month--had to meet at 5:45 a.m. to beat a deadline and enable Lancaster to collect $68,000 in new redevelopment taxes next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1992
To beat a legal deadline for a revenue program, the Lancaster City Council was to meet before dawn today. Members of the City Council and the city attorney, manager and clerk--who usually meet at 7 p.m. on the first and third Mondays of each month--had to meet at 5:45 a.m. to enable Lancaster to collect $68,000 in new redevelopment taxes next year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Antelope Valley residents will face continued danger from flooding for years to come because voters opted to create their own flood-control agency and defeated a Lancaster flood-control tax measure, officials said Wednesday. The defeat of the Lancaster measure in Tuesday's election means that the city will not get millions of extra dollars each year to build more flood-control projects.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 18, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER
Lancaster residents in June will be asked to approve an annual tax of $25 per house to pay for flood control projects that city officials promise will prevent severe flooding such as occurred last month. The City Council voted 5 to 0 Monday night to place the measure on the June 2 ballot after watching a videotape of residents paddling down flooded streets in inflatable rafts during last month's heavy rains. The measure will require a majority vote to pass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
Trustees of the 12,275-student Lancaster School District have proposed levying a school tax on future residential and commercial development in the district, hoping to raise more money for new facilities than through the state's current developer fee program. The district's board of trustees voted 5 to 0 Tuesday night to pursue the formation of a Mello-Roos district to tax future development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER and AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Antelope Valley residents, some still mopping up from the region's worst rain-induced flood in recent memory, will get a chance to vote June 2 on what steps they think feuding government officials should take to solve the problem. The Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday approved an advisory measure that will ask all Antelope Valley voters to pick from among three general flood control options.
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