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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2000 | SOLOMON MOORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An African American teenager who claimed that he was assaulted by three skinheads earlier this month admitted to authorities in Lancaster on Wednesday that he lied to avoid punishment for being in a fight with two black classmates. The 15-year-old confessed to a Los Angeles County sheriff's detective who confronted him with conflicting accounts of the attack. The boy said he had in fact gotten into a fight with two high school acquaintances and worried about damaging his braces.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO
Two Lancaster men were wounded in unrelated shootings early Saturday, Los Angeles County sheriff's officials said. Both men were transported to Antelope Valley Hospital, said Sheriff's Sgt. Michael Handley. Charles Yusta, 19, was shot in the chest about 3 a.m. in the 1000 block of East Norberry Street, Handley said. Investigators were searching for the gunman, he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1999 | BOB HOWARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A ban on new apartment construction isn't a debate in the Antelope Valley--it's reality. The cities of Palmdale and Lancaster have imposed moratoriums on apartment construction in recent months, although officials in both cities say there have been relatively few units built in recent years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 26, 1999 | AGNES DIGGS
Members of the Tuskegee Airmen, the famed World War II African American flying unit, will be on hand Sunday when the Lancaster City Council unveils a monument in their honor. In keeping with a tradition of recognizing the achievements of aviators, the city has placed a 6-foot brick pillar with a bronze plaque in front of the Western Hotel Museum, 357 W. Lancaster Blvd., to mark the airmen's place in history. The 4:15 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 1999 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 20 years ago, a small group of residents peered into the future and saw an Antelope Valley that troubled them: millions of people, widespread residential and commercial development and little apparent regard for the fragile desert. They asked city officials in 1981 to set aside land so future generations would be able to appreciate the pristine landscapes, regardless of the suburban sprawl that might surround them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1998 | DAVID ROSENZWEIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A reputed member of a skinhead group that terrorized African Americans in the Lancaster area was indicted for alleged civil rights violations Thursday by a federal grand jury. Eric Lance Dillard, an 18-year-old white man, was accused of taking part in the beating and stabbing of an African American youth who was set upon as he was walking along a Lancaster street on July 8, 1996.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | JOSE CARDENAS
I stood in a driveway in Lancaster with two stubble-haired young white men, just talking about life as the sun went down on the Antelope Valley. They looked and dressed something like the youths portrayed in an article last November in the New Yorker magazine, which described an apocalyptic Antelope Valley where skinhead gangs wage race war on minorities. Minorities like me.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1998 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spring wildflowers are busting out all over in the wake of the El Nino deluge. Hillsides from the desert to the sea are already sprouting the poppies, goldfields, sand verbenas and other colorful byproducts of a rain-soaked winter. But there is no joy--at least not yet--at the most famous wildflower spot in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1998 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spring wildflowers are busting out all over in the wake of the El Nino deluge. Hillsides from the desert to the sea are already sprouting the poppies, goldfields, sand verbenas and other colorful by-products of a rain soaked winter. Ironically, there is no joy--at least not yet--at the most famous wildflower spot in Southern California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1997 | DADE HAYES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Lancaster man pleaded guilty Monday to federal hate crime charges stemming from 1996 assaults on two black men. Prosecutors said Danny Edward Williams, 24, helped carry out the attacks to "rid the streets of Lancaster of African Americans," in the words of the plea bargain agreement. Williams, identified as a member of a gang called the Nazi Low Riders, will be sentenced Jan. 5.
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