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Lancaster Elementary School District

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 10,000 Antelope Valley youngsters braved 105-degree weather Monday for the start of year-round classes in Lancaster and Palmdale. Air-conditioning problems delayed the opening of one school and caused problems at another. Nine of 17 schools in the Palmdale School District and five of 14 in the Lancaster School District began classes under year-round schedules. All have air-conditioned or cooled classrooms. But that did not mean everything went smoothly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999
Skimpy early returns in Tuesday's election gave a substantial lead to a bond measure aimed at raising $29 million to give Lancaster elementary schools a face-lift. With only absentee ballots counted, the bond measure was drawing a yes vote of more than 72%. Approval of the measure would qualify the district for matching state funds, in keeping with last November's Proposition 1A state bond measure.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a legal battle that began almost a decade ago, the Lancaster School District has agreed to provide $265,000 in back pay and interest to about 40 teachers affected by a salary freeze that was ultimately ruled illegal. The lump sum payments, to be distributed within the next 30 days, will range from $1,300 to $20,000 per teacher. Beyond the $265,000 for back pay and interest, the school district spent $83,000 on legal costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1995 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a legal battle that began almost a decade ago, the Lancaster School District has agreed to provide $265,000 in back pay and interest to about 40 teachers affected by a salary freeze that was ultimately ruled illegal. The lump sum payments, to be distributed within the next 30 days, will range from $1,300 to $20,000 per teacher. Beyond the $265,000 for back pay and interest, the school district spent $83,000 on legal costs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1990 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trustees in the troubled Lancaster School District have voted themselves a 67% pay raise despite recent staff layoffs and complaints of a funding shortage so severe that some schoolrooms lack dictionaries and other student essentials. By a 3-2 margin after an emotional debate, the district's board members decided Tuesday night to take advantage of a state law that allows their salaries to increase from $240 to $400 a month because the district's enrollment exceeded 10,000 students last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 3, 1999
Skimpy early returns in Tuesday's election gave a substantial lead to a bond measure aimed at raising $29 million to give Lancaster elementary schools a face-lift. With only absentee ballots counted, the bond measure was drawing a yes vote of more than 72%. Approval of the measure would qualify the district for matching state funds, in keeping with last November's Proposition 1A state bond measure.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ninety-two people filed candidacy papers for seats on 15 school and water district boards in the November election, led by 14 candidates for a trio of seats on the governing board of the region's troubled high school district, county officials said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
Trustees of the 12,275-student Lancaster School District have proposed levying a school tax on future residential and commercial development in the district, hoping to raise more money for new facilities than through the state's current developer fee program. The district's board of trustees voted 5 to 0 Tuesday night to pursue the formation of a Mello-Roos district to tax future development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2000 | STEPHANIE STASSEL
More than two dozen area schools will receive $582,199 in state funds to buy playground equipment made from recycled materials, officials have announced. Statewide, nearly $2 million in grants were unanimously approved by the California Integrated Waste Management Board, part of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Money for the one-time grants came from Proposition 98 education funds, board spokeswoman Roni Java said.
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rampaging vandals wrecked furniture and equipment and set a fire that destroyed three classrooms of a Lancaster elementary school early today, causing an estimated $400,000 damage, authorities said. Authorities found a smashed clock with its hands fixed at 3:25 a.m., apparently marking the time vandals were breaking windows, toppling computers and dumping papers and files onto the floor of six classrooms and the teachers' lounge at Sierra Elementary School, Principal Irvine Wheeler said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ninety-two people filed candidacy papers for seats on 15 school and water district boards in the November election, led by 14 candidates for a trio of seats on the governing board of the region's troubled high school district, county officials said Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1992
Trustees of the 12,275-student Lancaster School District have proposed levying a school tax on future residential and commercial development in the district, hoping to raise more money for new facilities than through the state's current developer fee program. The district's board of trustees voted 5 to 0 Tuesday night to pursue the formation of a Mello-Roos district to tax future development.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 10,000 Antelope Valley youngsters braved 105-degree weather Monday for the start of year-round classes in Lancaster and Palmdale. Air-conditioning problems delayed the opening of one school and caused problems at another. Nine of 17 schools in the Palmdale School District and five of 14 in the Lancaster School District began classes under year-round schedules. All have air-conditioned or cooled classrooms. But that did not mean everything went smoothly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1990 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trustees in the troubled Lancaster School District have voted themselves a 67% pay raise despite recent staff layoffs and complaints of a funding shortage so severe that some schoolrooms lack dictionaries and other student essentials. By a 3-2 margin after an emotional debate, the district's board members decided Tuesday night to take advantage of a state law that allows their salaries to increase from $240 to $400 a month because the district's enrollment exceeded 10,000 students last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1990 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no barrio in the high desert, no longtime Latino neighborhood to offer a recent influx of Latin American immigrants the solace of language and culture. Social workers say the Antelope Valley's growing low-income population of immigrant laborers and farm workers does not yet have bilingual community agencies to serve its needs.
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