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Lancaster Landfill

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990
Contaminants have leaked into the ground water from a landfill in northern Lancaster, and state officials say they plan to order a cleanup. The contamination at the 100-acre Lancaster Landfill, run by Waste Management of North America Inc., poses no immediate threat to drinking water, officials said. It is about 80 feet underground, more than 100 feet above the aquifer from which half a dozen nearby homes are supplied.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trucks full of garbage from the city of El Cajon will begin arriving in the Lancaster area today, despite repeated efforts by local environmentalists and other residents to keep them from coming. Universal Refuse Removal, based in El Cajon, said it will initially haul as much as 150 tons of commercial waste a day to a privately owned landfill just outside the Lancaster city limits. By mid-July, when residential waste is also transported, the daily amount could reach 300 tons.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Expansion of the Lancaster Landfill, which will allow its owners to double the height of its garbage pile, was unanimously approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. State water board officials had approved the expansion in February, even though some toxic pollutants had seeped from the unlined landfill into ground water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 24, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Expansion of the Lancaster Landfill, which will allow its owners to double the height of its garbage pile, was unanimously approved Tuesday by the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors. State water board officials had approved the expansion in February, even though some toxic pollutants had seeped from the unlined landfill into ground water.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State water officials Friday gave permission to the operator of a nearly filled Antelope Valley dump to double the height of its piled garbage, a move expected to extend the facility's life span to the late 1990s. The Lancaster Landfill operated by Waste Management of California Inc., now limited to about 40 feet above the surrounding terrain, would be able to rise to about 78 feet under a new permit from the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the largest landfill in the Antelope Valley won tentative permission from the county Wednesday to double the height of the 100-acre operation and thereby extend its expected life span to the late 1990s. After a 2 1/2-hour hearing at Lancaster City Hall, the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission gave preliminary approval to expansion plans submitted by Waste Management of California Inc. for its Lancaster Landfill just north of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1994 | SHARON MOESER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trucks full of garbage from the city of El Cajon will begin arriving in the Lancaster area today, despite repeated efforts by local environmentalists and other residents to keep them from coming. Universal Refuse Removal, based in El Cajon, said it will initially haul as much as 150 tons of commercial waste a day to a privately owned landfill just outside the Lancaster city limits. By mid-July, when residential waste is also transported, the daily amount could reach 300 tons.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Supervisor Mike Antonovich's bid to keep El Cajon's garbage out of a Lancaster landfill failed Tuesday when no one seconded his motion to prohibit the dumping of out-of-county waste in the Antelope Valley. But Antonovich received unanimous support on a follow-up proposal to conduct public hearings this year on how best to manage the remaining space in the county's trash dumps.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1994 | TRACEY KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Antelope Valley has been called a lot of things--a cultural wasteland, a developer's paradise, the methamphetamine capital of Los Angeles County--but a dump? That's how the San Diego County city of El Cajon views the area--as a perfect place to haul its trash and save money in the process.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1992 | BLAINE HALLEY
The city of Lancaster is sponsoring a Christmas tree recycling program to help the city adhere to state regulations that require less waste going into landfills. The city has arranged with Waste Management of Lancaster and A. V. Rubbish to collect cut trees after the holidays during regularly scheduled trash pickups. They will be shredded and mixed with leaves to make a mulch, which will later be given free to the public at the Lancaster landfill.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1992 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State water officials Friday gave permission to the operator of a nearly filled Antelope Valley dump to double the height of its piled garbage, a move expected to extend the facility's life span to the late 1990s. The Lancaster Landfill operated by Waste Management of California Inc., now limited to about 40 feet above the surrounding terrain, would be able to rise to about 78 feet under a new permit from the Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1991 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Owners of the largest landfill in the Antelope Valley won tentative permission from the county Wednesday to double the height of the 100-acre operation and thereby extend its expected life span to the late 1990s. After a 2 1/2-hour hearing at Lancaster City Hall, the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission gave preliminary approval to expansion plans submitted by Waste Management of California Inc. for its Lancaster Landfill just north of the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990
Contaminants have leaked into the ground water from a landfill in northern Lancaster, and state officials say they plan to order a cleanup. The contamination at the 100-acre Lancaster Landfill, run by Waste Management of North America Inc., poses no immediate threat to drinking water, officials said. It is about 80 feet underground, more than 100 feet above the aquifer from which half a dozen nearby homes are supplied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1998 | SHARON BERNSTEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One thing people learn quickly when they live in the Antelope Valley is that the wind can really blow. On Thanksgiving night a couple of years ago, the gusts were so strong that a barn on the farm where the Bio Gro company has its local operations blew three-quarters of a mile down the road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Cancer-causing contaminants have leaked into the ground water from a landfill in northern Lancaster, and state officials say they plan to order a cleanup. The ground-water contamination at the 100-acre Lancaster Landfill, which is run by the world's largest waste company, is serious but does not pose an immediate threat to nearby drinking water supplies, water quality officials said Friday.
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