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Lance Allyn

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena's flight around the world will be delayed here until at least Tuesday so that equipment malfunctions aboard both his plane and a chase plane can be repaired, coordinators of the flight said Sunday. The autopilot on 11-year-old Tony's single-engine Cessna Centurion malfunctioned during the 2 1/2-hour flight Saturday from Washington to Boston. Also, a malfunction in the cabin pressurization system of a twin-engine chase plane filled that aircraft with smoke and forced pilot Lance Allyn to land after takeoff Saturday from Washington National Airport.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena's flight around the world will be delayed here until at least Tuesday so that equipment malfunctions aboard both his plane and a chase plane can be repaired, coordinators of the flight said Sunday. The autopilot on 11-year-old Tony's single-engine Cessna Centurion malfunctioned during the 2 1/2-hour flight Saturday from Washington to Boston. Also, a malfunction in the cabin pressurization system of a twin-engine chase plane filled that aircraft with smoke and forced pilot Lance Allyn to land after takeoff Saturday from Washington National Airport.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
I thought I was going to die. There we were, engulfed in smoke in the cramped cabin of a twin-engine plane with the pilot, fire extinguisher in hand, nearly hanging his head out the window for air and desperately trying to steer his ailing craft back to ground. That experience Saturday aboard a Beechcraft King Air, one of two chase planes in 11-year-old Tony Aliengena's quest to circumnavigate the globe, realized my worst nightmares about flying in a private plane. Although pilot Lance Allyn landed the aircraft safely and none of us suffered too badly from smoke inhalation, I thought it was over--especially when I looked into the cockpit, clutching my T-shirt to my mouth, and could barely see Allyn through the swirling smoke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
I thought I was going to die. There we were, engulfed in smoke in the cramped cabin of a twin-engine plane with the pilot, fire extinguisher in hand, nearly hanging his head out the window for air and desperately trying to steer his ailing craft back to ground. That experience Saturday aboard a Beechcraft King Air, one of two chase planes in 11-year-old Tony Aliengena's quest to circumnavigate the globe, realized my worst nightmares about flying in a private plane. Although pilot Lance Allyn landed the aircraft safely and none of us suffered too badly from smoke inhalation, I thought it was over--especially when I looked into the cockpit, clutching my T-shirt to my mouth, and could barely see Allyn through the swirling smoke.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The first sign of trouble came just moments after takeoff from National Airport about 12:40 p.m., when pilot Lance Allyn smelled smoke in the cockpit of his twin-engine airplane. "Where's the smoke coming from? I smell smoke," Allyn inquired urgently as wisps of gray smoke began seeping from the instrument panel of his King Air, which was ferrying luggage and members of an entourage for boy aviator Tony Aliengena of San Juan Capistrano in his bid to become the youngest pilot to fly around the world.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Accompanying Tony Aliengena on his historic flight around the world will be an entourage of 17 people, including his family and journalists from the United States and Soviet Union. Five passengers will be seated in Tony's single-engine Cessna Centurion. The other members of the entourage will ride in two chase planes. IN TONY'S CESSNA His father, Gary Aliengena, 39, a certified pilot who owns the plane. Aliengena, a real estate investor and truck transportation broker, taught Tony to fly and will be riding in the co-pilot's seat for the duration of the flight.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena flew into a ferocious ice and thunderstorm Tuesday on the second leg of his 17,000-mile round-the-world journey, knocking out his small plane's compass and forcing the 11-year-old navigator to negotiate a route through the treacherous Rocky Mountains with only a pocket compass. The San Juan Capistrano youth landed safely at Centennial Airport outside Denver almost 90 minutes behind schedule, shaken but confident that the long flight through driving winds, sleet and rain might be some of the worst weather he will experience on his seven-week odyssey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena, the boy aviator from San Juan Capistrano trying to become the youngest person to circle the world, crossed the United States on Saturday afternoon but landed in Boston with equipment problems. Mechanical malfunctions plagued not only his plane, but one of his two chase planes as well. The autopilot mechanism on Tony's single-engine Cessna Centurion malfunctioned during his 2 1/2-hour flight between National Airport in Washington and Lawrence Airport, outside Boston, according to his father, Gary Aliengena.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | From a Times Staff Writer
A twin-engine airplane that was ferrying luggage and members of an entourage for boy aviator Tony Aliengena was forced to make an emergency landing after clouds of smoke spewed from the instrument panel. The plane--following 11-year-old Aliengena in his bid to become the youngest pilot to fly around the world--landed safely back at National Airport shortly after takeoff. There were no injuries, although a few passengers were treated for dizziness and minor smoke inhalation. Aliengena, who experienced mechanical trouble in his own plane Saturday, was unaware of the difficulties with the "chase" plane until he landed at Lawrence Airport outside Boston on the sixth leg of his seven-week "Friendship Flight."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 16, 1989
This letter is to express my appreciation for the wonderful news stories that you are writing about the flight of Tony Aliengena around the world and across Russia. The amazing thing is that his and Lance Allyn's trip is to places that are not on the map. My 20-year-old world globe does not show Tumen, Bratsk or Mirnyi, not to mention Providenia. David Puckett's terrific map (July 2) may cause a million California readers to focus in on the vastness of the Soviet Union. I for one, a pilot of a single-engine Beechcraft Bonanza based in Orange County, am sometimes aloft with these California adventurers, looking down on the wilderness (without rescue systems)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
The first sign of trouble came just moments after takeoff from National Airport about 12:40 p.m., when pilot Lance Allyn smelled smoke in the cockpit of his twin-engine airplane. "Where's the smoke coming from? I smell smoke," Allyn inquired urgently as wisps of gray smoke began seeping from the instrument panel of his King Air, which was ferrying luggage and members of an entourage for boy aviator Tony Aliengena of San Juan Capistrano in his bid to become the youngest pilot to fly around the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena, the boy aviator from San Juan Capistrano trying to become the youngest person to circle the world, crossed the United States on Saturday afternoon but landed in Boston with equipment problems. Mechanical malfunctions plagued not only his plane, but one of his two chase planes as well. The autopilot mechanism on Tony's single-engine Cessna Centurion malfunctioned during his 2 1/2-hour flight between National Airport in Washington and Lawrence Airport, outside Boston, according to his father, Gary Aliengena.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena flew into a ferocious ice and thunderstorm Tuesday on the second leg of his 17,000-mile round-the-world journey, knocking out his small plane's compass and forcing the 11-year-old navigator to negotiate a route through the treacherous Rocky Mountains with only a pocket compass. The San Juan Capistrano youth landed safely at Centennial Airport outside Denver almost 90 minutes behind schedule, shaken but confident that the long flight through driving winds, sleet and rain might be some of the worst weather he will experience on his seven-week odyssey.
NEWS
June 4, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Accompanying Tony Aliengena on his historic flight around the world will be an entourage of 17 people, including his family and journalists from the United States and Soviet Union. Five passengers will be seated in Tony's single-engine Cessna Centurion. The other members of the entourage will ride in two chase planes. IN TONY'S CESSNA His father, Gary Aliengena, 39, a certified pilot who owns the plane. Aliengena, a real estate investor and truck transportation broker, taught Tony to fly and will be riding in the co-pilot's seat for the duration of the flight.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | KEVIN O'LEARY
Eight people, including his family, a Soviet pen pal, a reporter and members of a film crew recording Tony Aliengena's Friendship Flight '89, were aboard his Cessna Centurion when it crashed Tuesday on the runway in Golovin, Alaska: -Tony, 11. -Gary Aliengena, 39, a certified pilot who owns the plane and was at the controls. -Susan Aliengena, 39, Tony's mother, who has been in charge of such logistical details as obtaining the visas for all the Americans on the trip.
NEWS
July 19, 1989 | JIM CARLTON, Times Staff Writer
Federal authorities today launched an investigation into the crash of a plane containing 11-year-old Tony Aliengena and seven members of his round-the-world flight crew, saying it appeared that the plane was carrying two more passengers than was legal.
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