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Lance E Thomas

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG and ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the first sharp cracks of gunfire erupted across the street from the West Los Angeles balloon store where he works, Monet Delapaz figured it was just a car backfiring on Santa Monica Boulevard. But when the blasts continued in a furious burst--from five to 10 to somewhere around 15--he knew what had happened. "Another one bites the dust," he thought to himself. "The watch store again." Delapaz was correct. What he heard Thursday afternoon was yet another gunfight at The Watch Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside his tiny apartment--protected by a burglar alarm and bulletproof glass and with a 9-millimeter pistol in his waistband--Lance Thomas says he has found a measure of peace. In a little more than two years, the watch dealer killed five armed robbers and wounded another in a series of shootouts at his West Los Angeles store that made him a hero to some and a vigilante to others.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992 | NIESON HIMMEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed robbers keep gambling that they can hold up The Watch Co. in West Los Angeles. And they keep losing. Two more were shot to death Thursday at the small shop where owner Lance Thomas buys and sells expensive Rolex watches and antique pocket timepieces, police said. That brings the total to five killed and one wounded at the shop since August, 1989. Shortly after 4 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992
I was surprised and dismayed to see that some of your readers (letters, Feb. 29 and Platform, March 1) viewed my comments (Feb. 21) regarding the law of self-defense as a condemnation of watch store owner Lance E. Thomas. Please set the record straight. I believe in self-defense. Indeed, Thomas may very well have been acting properly in defending himself and others. Nonetheless, as my remarks reflected, I think that it is important for the community to examine carefully any situation in which a person repeatedly kills others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1992
I was surprised and dismayed to see that some of your readers (letters, Feb. 29 and Platform, March 1) viewed my comments (Feb. 21) regarding the law of self-defense as a condemnation of watch store owner Lance E. Thomas. Please set the record straight. I believe in self-defense. Indeed, Thomas may very well have been acting properly in defending himself and others. Nonetheless, as my remarks reflected, I think that it is important for the community to examine carefully any situation in which a person repeatedly kills others.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | ASHLEY DUNN and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When it came to security, Lance E. Thomas left nothing to chance. Wherever he maneuvered near the glass display counter of his West Los Angeles watch renovation shop, there was a gun within reach. Merchants who visited Thomas regularly at his shop, the Watch Company, would watch in awe as he removed the weapons from their hiding spots--a .357 magnum handgun, a Smith & Wesson .38, a shotgun and other guns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inside his tiny apartment--protected by a burglar alarm and bulletproof glass and with a 9-millimeter pistol in his waistband--Lance Thomas says he has found a measure of peace. In a little more than two years, the watch dealer killed five armed robbers and wounded another in a series of shootouts at his West Los Angeles store that made him a hero to some and a vigilante to others.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 29, 1992
Maybe I misread the facts in "Merchant's Rising Death Toll Raises Questions" (Feb. 22), but I hope it would seem reasonable to most people that two men who enter a jewelry store with guns drawn are not there to make a purchase. As a police officer, I far from condone vigilantism, but if Lance E. Thomas' most recent acts in defense of his business and life are looked upon by some as executions, then I suggest that all business owners close their doors immediately because armed robbery has just been deemed a justifiable act. How would Laura Levenson (criminal law teacher at Loyola Law School)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG and ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the first sharp cracks of gunfire erupted across the street from the West Los Angeles balloon store where he works, Monet Delapaz figured it was just a car backfiring on Santa Monica Boulevard. But when the blasts continued in a furious burst--from five to 10 to somewhere around 15--he knew what had happened. "Another one bites the dust," he thought to himself. "The watch store again." Delapaz was correct. What he heard Thursday afternoon was yet another gunfight at The Watch Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1992 | NIESON HIMMEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Armed robbers keep gambling that they can hold up The Watch Co. in West Los Angeles. And they keep losing. Two more were shot to death Thursday at the small shop where owner Lance Thomas buys and sells expensive Rolex watches and antique pocket timepieces, police said. That brings the total to five killed and one wounded at the shop since August, 1989. Shortly after 4 p.m.
NEWS
November 29, 1989 | ASHLEY DUNN and ANDREA FORD, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When it came to security, Lance E. Thomas left nothing to chance. Wherever he maneuvered near the glass display counter of his West Los Angeles watch renovation shop, there was a gun within reach. Merchants who visited Thomas regularly at his shop, the Watch Company, would watch in awe as he removed the weapons from their hiding spots--a .357 magnum handgun, a Smith & Wesson .38, a shotgun and other guns.
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