Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLand Management
IN THE NEWS

Land Management

FEATURED ARTICLES
NATIONAL
December 29, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
Kathleen Clarke, the first woman to head the Interior Department's Bureau of Land Management, has resigned to return to her home state of Utah. Interior Secretary Dirk Kempthorne said Clarke had created more recreational opportunities for Americans and sped up "environmentally sensitive" oil and natural gas production on federal lands since taking over the agency in January 2002. "Our public lands, our forests and our landscapes are better off" because of Clarke's service, Kempthorne said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
April 27, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Some 50 political leaders from nine Western states gathered in Salt Lake City this month to discuss plans to wrest control of millions of acres of public lands from the federal government. One wonders whether, like a dog chasing a car, they've figured out what they would do with the land if they got hold of it? In any case, that's unlikely to happen, based on decades of court battles and settled law. Nevertheless, these angry legislators and local commissioners seem determined to waste time and energy on this futile effort, propelled by a warped sense of history and priorities.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1989
When a ranch goes on sale in the West, chances are the advertisement will carry a notation something like this: "For sale: 10,000-acre ranch (1,500 acres deeded)." The 1,500 acres is the land actually owned by the rancher himself. The other 8,500 most likely is land leased from the federal government, primarily from the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, usually for grazing livestock and almost certainly at bargain-basement prices. The property belongs to all the people of the United States, but in Western culture and practice, much of this leased land has been used by the same ranch families for so long, it is assumed to be part of the ranch.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up and fight? Are you heading to Bunkerville/For your freedom and rights? Are you heading to Bunkerville/To stand up with me? -- From the song “Are You Heading to Bunkerville?” by Wayne and Paula Carson BUNKERVILLE, Nev. -- Susan DeLemus watched as her man headed to Bunkerville. The Rochester, N.H., resident was trolling the computer earlier this month with her husband, Jerry, when she saw him stiffen with surprise and rage at what he saw on his own computer screen.
NEWS
October 30, 1985
Harold L. Oppenheimer, who turned a small real estate and loan operation into one of the biggest cattle investment and land management firms in the nation, died of cancer Sunday at the Scripps Clinic in La Jolla. He had traveled to California from Kansas City to accompany his wife, Daphne, who was receiving treatment at the clinic.
NEWS
August 11, 2002 | From Associated Press
During his two terms, President Clinton created 19 monuments and expanded three others, putting more than 5.6 million acres under protection. Congress also created one. Most of the new monuments are managed by the Interior Department's Bureau of Land Management under its National Landscape Conservation System, another Clinton brainchild created in June 2000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The canyon slopes of Laguna Beach are a bit lonelier and quieter than they were a few weeks ago, when a herd of goats grazed them. In little more than two months, the goats succeeded in clearing firebreaks through the coastal chaparral of Laguna Beach to protect nearby houses from potential brush fires during the summer dry spell. They were shipped earlier this month to Northern California. "They did wonderfully well," said Deputy Fire Chief Rich Dewberry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1993 | ERIK SKINDRUD, Erik Skindrud is a Huntington Beach writer who specializes in local history
Even before the menacing clouds of smoke above Orange County had cleared, politicians, local officials and homeowners were busy fanning the flames of another storm--the race to place the blame for the worst wildfires in local memory. According to Gov. Pete Wilson, who arrived when the flames were still fuming, the fire was the fault of a "sick animal" arsonist, who could be captured with the help of a $50,000 reward. To Rep.
NEWS
July 15, 1993 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patchwork suburban sprawl is gobbling up some of the nation's most productive farmland, with California's Central Valley and coastal counties among the most threatened agricultural regions, a conservation group warned in a study released Wednesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2009 | Louis Sahagun
A federal judge has rejected key provisions of a plan for managing millions of acres in the California desert, saying the U.S. Bureau of Land Management designated roughly 5,000 miles of off-road vehicle routes without properly taking into account their impact on public lands, archaeological sites and wildlife. U.S. District Judge Susan Illston on Monday ruled that the West Mojave plan, which the bureau approved in 2006 after a decade of development, is "flawed because it does not contain a reasonable range of alternatives" to limit the number of miles of off-road routes.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By David Horsey
The right-wing insurrection at the Bundy ranch in Bunkerville, Nev., has taken another weird turn with new revelations about the family history of Cliven Bundy. Bundy justifies his two-decade-long refusal to pay the Bureau of Land Management for grazing rights on the public land where he runs his cattle by claiming his ancestors gained livestock water rights in the 1870s, long before the federal government horned in on the deal. Now, it turns out, that is not exactly true.  KLAS, the CBS affiliate in Las Vegas, checked out the Bundy family's history with the land and found Bundy's grandmother was born in 1901 to parents who had moved a few years earlier from Utah and farmed, not in Bunkerville, but in neighboring Mesquite County.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By John M. Glionna and Richard Simon
BUNKERVILLE, Nev. - The first thing you see on the drive to Cliven Bundy's ranch are the American flags - tied to roadside guardrails, flapping in a hard desert wind. At a bend in state Route 170 sits the so-called Patriot Checkpoint, evidence of the tense power play raging between the rebellious 67-year-old cattleman and the federal government. Then there are the guns. Scores of grim citizen militiamen in combat fatigues - semiautomatic weapons slung over their shoulders, ammunition magazines at their belts - patrol from a base they call Camp Tripwire.
OPINION
April 23, 2014 | Times Editorial Board
Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy is being portrayed by some as a man of principle, an iconoclast who should be admired for his willingness to stand up to the federal government. But in fact he's a petty scofflaw who seems to think that he has the right to pick and choose which rules must be obeyed. Bundy is the cattleman who grazes his herd on federal land operated by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, but unlike more than 15,000 other ranchers, he refuses to pay the associated grazing fees.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By John M. Glionna, This post has been corrected. See below for details.
The battle lines are hardening in Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy's so-called range war against the federal government over his right to graze cattle on public lands. Arguments have moved from the Nevada desert to the nation's capital, where Nevada's two U.S. senators, Republican Dean Heller and Democrat Harry Reid, recently faced off on a television public affairs show in Las Vegas. Heller described Bundy's cadre of armed supporters as “patriots” during the show, "What's the Point," on KSNV-TV News 3. Reid repeated his claim that the so-called militia men are “domestic terrorists.” Officials from the Bureau of Land Management say Bundy is illegally running hundreds of head of cattle in the 600,000-acre Gold Butte area, habitat of the federally protected desert tortoise.
OPINION
April 15, 2014
Re "BLM relents after standoff," April 13 Relenting to the demands of the armed supporters of Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who has his cattle graze on public land but refuses to pay the U.S. Bureau of Land Management, sends a dangerous message: that disputes with the federal government are best resolved with threats of violence. This outcome will only inspire more radicals to take arms against the U.S. government. This is a serious setback for civil discourse and undermines the rule of law that all citizens need for safety and stability.
NATIONAL
April 12, 2014 | By Paresh Dave and John M. Glionna
Fearing for their safety as armed protesters gathered in the Nevada back country, federal officials on Saturday suddenly ended a controversial effort to seize hundreds of cattle that a rancher has kept illegally on public land. The cattle ranch's owner, Cliven Bundy, and hundreds of armed supporters had threatened to forcefully keep Bureau of Land Management employees from rounding up the approximately 900 cattle. Nearly 400 of the cattle had been seized during the past week. They were being held nearby and could be sent to Utah, authorities said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 2013 | By Tony Perry
RAMONA, Calif. - Filaree, daughter of Anza and Fiera, is standing in her field - which currently is 140 acres of pasture land in this rural, horse-loving community northeast of San Diego. Inquisitive, unafraid of visitors and with a gentleness that belies her designation as a "wild" equine, Filaree is among 20 horses in the pasture, all mares and foals. Four stallions, including Anza, are kept in a corral miles away. DNA testing has shown that the mares and stallions and their recent offspring are descended from horses that carried a Spanish military expedition into the region in the mid-1700s.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2014 | By John M. Glionna and Richard Simon
BUNKERVILLE, Nev. - The first thing you see on the drive to Cliven Bundy's ranch are the American flags - tied to roadside guardrails, flapping in a hard desert wind. At a bend in state Route 170 sits the so-called Patriot Checkpoint, evidence of the tense power play raging between the rebellious 67-year-old cattleman and the federal government. Then there are the guns. Scores of grim citizen militiamen in combat fatigues - semiautomatic weapons slung over their shoulders, ammunition magazines at their belts - patrol from a base they call Camp Tripwire.
NATIONAL
April 9, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Nevada's governor and one of its U.S. senators have joined a chorus of criticism of a month-long federal government roundup of a recalcitrant rancher's 900 cattle that for decades have grazed on hundreds of thousands of acres of public lands near here. Gov. Brian Sandoval said in a statement that his office has received numerous complaints about the operation by the Bureau of Land Management and National Park Service to collect cattle belonging to southern Nevada rancher Cliven Bundy, who for decades has refused to pay the required fees to graze his animals on public land.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|