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NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Officials in Nevada's isolated Pershing County want to make it perfectly clear: When it comes to the wild-and-wacky Burning Man festival held each year in their midst, they're not going to get burned financially. Not even close. The want to increase their bill for law enforcement and security for the Labor Day weekend bacchanal in the Black Rock Desert, on land overseen by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. So far, state legislators aren't buying any price increase plans. A Nevada legislative panel this week narrowly approved a bill to prevent the sprawling county (population 6,734)
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NATIONAL
November 11, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Bureau of Land Management needs to consider euthanizing wild horses or selling many of them to reduce spiraling costs of keeping them in long-term holding pens, the Government Accountability Office reported. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, said costs of caring for the horses likely will account for 74% of the program's overall budget this year. There are about 33,000 wild horses on the range and another 30,000 in holding facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2009 | Tony Perry
The San Diego Zoo is joining the federal effort to save the threatened desert tortoise, officials announced Saturday. Zoo specialists will aid the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in operating the 250-acre tortoise conservation center near Las Vegas, home to about 1,000 desert tortoises. The center is run by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Biologists from the zoo will monitor the health of the tortoises and help those that are ailing. Bob Williams, Nevada field supervisor for the Fish and Wildlife Service, called the agreement "a great step forward" in saving the desert tortoise from extinction.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996
It appears there is little hope for your editorial staff to understand natural resource and land management issues (" 'Reform' Bills for the Round File," editorial, Feb. 26). First, the emergency salvage law is not "logging without laws" as environmentalists claim, but a streamlining of the cumbersome and litigious process of approving timber sales on the most unhealthy and fire-prone forests on federal lands, rather "logging without litigation." It is a short-term environmental and economic fix that President Clinton signed last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988
One needs to have sympathy for the plight in which Walter Bickel finds himself: accused of "squatting" on Bureau of Land Management lands ("Time Running Out for Old Prospector's Desert Mining Camp," Part I, Sept. 20). Clearly there is the making of human tragedy there and government officials should act accordingly. Contributing to this predicament, however, has been the BLM's deliberate and chronic neglect of its stewardship of federal lands. Now that agency contends that at last it has the funds and personnel to do what it should have been doing all along.
OPINION
March 7, 2012 | By Robert H. Nelson
Like much else in government, U.S. public land policy is a vestige of the past, established in 1910 when America's population was just 92.2 million and a Western state such as Nevada had only 81,000 residents. Today our needs are much different and much greater. The United States can no longer afford to keep tens of millions of acres of "public" land locked up and out of service. Some of these lands have great commercial value; others are environmental treasures. We need policies capable of distinguishing between the two. Few Easterners realize the immense magnitude of the public lands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993
Having spent literally hundreds of hours of staff time working with reporter Warren Olney, we are surprised and disappointed with his poor understanding of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) land exchange program in California ("Psst, Wanna Buy 5 Acres for $100?" Commentary, Jan. 7). The BLM exchanges land for fair market value. Qualified BLM appraisers are required under laws set by Congress to find current and comparable private land sales and to utilize those sales in determining the value of public lands.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan rejected a request to halt the roundup of about 190 wild horses in the Pryor Mountains along the Montana-Wyoming border. Two Colorado-based advocacy groups had sought an injunction. The Bureau of Land Management, which operates the 38,000-acre Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, said the roundup would begin today. The agency intends to capture the range's entire population, with 70 adult horses and their foals to be kept for adoption. The rest will be freed after some of the mares are given a contraceptive vaccine, the BLM said.
OPINION
November 5, 2002
"White House Reinterpreting Law on Environmental Reviews" (Nov. 3) should wake all Americans to the very real threat of destruction to our national treasures. If the Bush administration succeeds in reversing current environmental laws, the legacy of unspoiled wilderness and wildlife habitat will be lost forever and will go the way of the rapidly disappearing rain forests. Our children will be denied the opportunity to observe and appreciate nature and all its marvels. This is not just an issue for environmentalists; it affects everyone.
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