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May 13, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Ranchers often argue that cattle grazing is the best way to combat cheatgrass, an aggressive invader that has taken over vast areas of the Great Basin, destroying the native sagebrush ecosystem and fueling huge wildfires. But a study published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology arrives at the opposite conclusion. Reseachers who studied 75 Great Basin sites invaded by cheatgrass found that greater grazing intensity promoted the alien's spread. “Our findings raise serious concerns regarding proposals to use cattle grazing to control [cheatgrass]
March 6, 1996
It appears there is little hope for your editorial staff to understand natural resource and land management issues (" 'Reform' Bills for the Round File," editorial, Feb. 26). First, the emergency salvage law is not "logging without laws" as environmentalists claim, but a streamlining of the cumbersome and litigious process of approving timber sales on the most unhealthy and fire-prone forests on federal lands, rather "logging without litigation." It is a short-term environmental and economic fix that President Clinton signed last year.
October 5, 1988
One needs to have sympathy for the plight in which Walter Bickel finds himself: accused of "squatting" on Bureau of Land Management lands ("Time Running Out for Old Prospector's Desert Mining Camp," Part I, Sept. 20). Clearly there is the making of human tragedy there and government officials should act accordingly. Contributing to this predicament, however, has been the BLM's deliberate and chronic neglect of its stewardship of federal lands. Now that agency contends that at last it has the funds and personnel to do what it should have been doing all along.
January 20, 1993
Having spent literally hundreds of hours of staff time working with reporter Warren Olney, we are surprised and disappointed with his poor understanding of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) land exchange program in California ("Psst, Wanna Buy 5 Acres for $100?" Commentary, Jan. 7). The BLM exchanges land for fair market value. Qualified BLM appraisers are required under laws set by Congress to find current and comparable private land sales and to utilize those sales in determining the value of public lands.
December 18, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
A $5.8-million settlement has been reached with the relatives of those killed and a dozen who were injured when a truck competing in an off-road desert race careened into a crowd of spectators, their lawyers announced Wednesday. In the 2010 accident in the desert near Victorville, the truck, a modified Ford Ranger, went out of control during the California 200 race and went airborne, slamming into the crowd, killing eight and injuring dozens. The settlement, reached Tuesday, includes 12 of those injured.  Lawyers said the bulk of the settlement - about $4.8 million - would be paid by the Bureau of Land Management, which failed to follow its safety procedures during the race, an internal review found.
September 3, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan rejected a request to halt the roundup of about 190 wild horses in the Pryor Mountains along the Montana-Wyoming border. Two Colorado-based advocacy groups had sought an injunction. The Bureau of Land Management, which operates the 38,000-acre Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, said the roundup would begin today. The agency intends to capture the range's entire population, with 70 adult horses and their foals to be kept for adoption. The rest will be freed after some of the mares are given a contraceptive vaccine, the BLM said.
November 5, 2002
"White House Reinterpreting Law on Environmental Reviews" (Nov. 3) should wake all Americans to the very real threat of destruction to our national treasures. If the Bush administration succeeds in reversing current environmental laws, the legacy of unspoiled wilderness and wildlife habitat will be lost forever and will go the way of the rapidly disappearing rain forests. Our children will be denied the opportunity to observe and appreciate nature and all its marvels. This is not just an issue for environmentalists; it affects everyone.
May 23, 1989
Yuba Natural Resources, the troubled mining firm whose former chairman, Richard Silberman, was arrested April 7 on money-laundering charges, has made an overdue $131,000 payment to the U. S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Land Management as part of a settlement of mineral trespass charges. The payment, which was due April 1, stemmed from charges filed by the bureau last year in connection with Yuba's 9,900-acre mining field near Marysville. Yuba still owes the bureau $400,000, which it will pay off in annual installments through 1993, bureau area manager Deane Swickard said Monday.
January 24, 1992
Sen. Seymour is not trying to "cut by more than half" the acreage in HR 2929 or S 21. He is merely saying that these bills are not the compromise that HR 3066 actually is. HR 3066, introduced by Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-Redlands), is the compromise bill. This bill was developed by the Bureau of Land Management, under the direction of Congress in 1976, when members enacted the Federal Lands Policy Management Act. Through this act, the public was extensively involved, everybody lost something and there was a compromise.
August 5, 2004
Re "How Blue Was My Valley," Opinion, Aug. 1: D.J. Waldie sets up a straw man and then destroys it. He postulates a conservancy for the Owens Valley and then attacks all state conservancies. The only person mentioning a conservancy for the Owens Valley was L.A. Mayor James Hahn, and he then withdrew the idea. What environmentalists and a growing number of citizens want is a conservation easement on the development rights on the lands in the Eastern Sierra owned by the city of Los Angeles.
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