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NATIONAL
November 14, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
An investigative journalist who has reported on the federal government's alleged sale of hundreds of wild horses to a known kill-buyer has released a video of a face-off in which Interior Secretary Ken Salazar threatens to punch him during an impromptu interview. Dave Philipps, now a reporter for the Colorado Springs Gazette, conducted a two-minute interview with the cowboy-hat-wearing Salazar, a Democrat, at an event taking place at an Obama campaign office in Fountain, Colo., on Election Day. In September, Philipps' article for the online ProPublica investigative group claimed the Bureau of Land Management, which manages hundreds of millions of acres of public land in 11 states, was knowingly selling wild horses to a middleman who is thought to have taken them to Mexico for eventual slaughter.
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NATIONAL
April 12, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
Officials in Nevada's isolated Pershing County want to make it perfectly clear: When it comes to the wild-and-wacky Burning Man festival held each year in their midst, they're not going to get burned financially. Not even close. The want to increase their bill for law enforcement and security for the Labor Day weekend bacchanal in the Black Rock Desert, on land overseen by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. So far, state legislators aren't buying any price increase plans. A Nevada legislative panel this week narrowly approved a bill to prevent the sprawling county (population 6,734)
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS - Wielding signs and slogans, several hundred demonstrators rallied Monday to support beleaguered cattle rancher Cliven Bundy and his family in a turf battle against the federal government. They had responded to an alert promising a new skirmish: “Range War begins at the Bundy ranch at 9:30 a.m. We're going to get the job done!” Bundy is battling with federal officials over his cattle's grazing on 150 square miles of scrub desert overseen by the Bureau of Land Management.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Bureau of Land Management needs to consider euthanizing wild horses or selling many of them to reduce spiraling costs of keeping them in long-term holding pens, the Government Accountability Office reported. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, said costs of caring for the horses likely will account for 74% of the program's overall budget this year. There are about 33,000 wild horses on the range and another 30,000 in holding facilities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2009 | Tony Perry
The San Diego Zoo is joining the federal effort to save the threatened desert tortoise, officials announced Saturday. Zoo specialists will aid the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in operating the 250-acre tortoise conservation center near Las Vegas, home to about 1,000 desert tortoises. The center is run by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Biologists from the zoo will monitor the health of the tortoises and help those that are ailing. Bob Williams, Nevada field supervisor for the Fish and Wildlife Service, called the agreement "a great step forward" in saving the desert tortoise from extinction.
SCIENCE
May 13, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Ranchers often argue that cattle grazing is the best way to combat cheatgrass, an aggressive invader that has taken over vast areas of the Great Basin, destroying the native sagebrush ecosystem and fueling huge wildfires. But a study published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology arrives at the opposite conclusion. Reseachers who studied 75 Great Basin sites invaded by cheatgrass found that greater grazing intensity promoted the alien's spread. “Our findings raise serious concerns regarding proposals to use cattle grazing to control [cheatgrass]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996
It appears there is little hope for your editorial staff to understand natural resource and land management issues (" 'Reform' Bills for the Round File," editorial, Feb. 26). First, the emergency salvage law is not "logging without laws" as environmentalists claim, but a streamlining of the cumbersome and litigious process of approving timber sales on the most unhealthy and fire-prone forests on federal lands, rather "logging without litigation." It is a short-term environmental and economic fix that President Clinton signed last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988
One needs to have sympathy for the plight in which Walter Bickel finds himself: accused of "squatting" on Bureau of Land Management lands ("Time Running Out for Old Prospector's Desert Mining Camp," Part I, Sept. 20). Clearly there is the making of human tragedy there and government officials should act accordingly. Contributing to this predicament, however, has been the BLM's deliberate and chronic neglect of its stewardship of federal lands. Now that agency contends that at last it has the funds and personnel to do what it should have been doing all along.
OPINION
July 27, 2009
What could be more authentically Western than a herd of mustangs thundering across the range as windblown tumbleweeds roll across their path? A lot of things, actually. Both horses and tumbleweeds, or Russian thistle, were introduced from overseas, and both wreak environmental havoc. The thistle was imported accidentally on ships carrying grain; the horse's history goes back hundreds of years to the first Spanish explorers.
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