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NATIONAL
November 11, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Bureau of Land Management needs to consider euthanizing wild horses or selling many of them to reduce spiraling costs of keeping them in long-term holding pens, the Government Accountability Office reported. The GAO, the investigative arm of Congress, said costs of caring for the horses likely will account for 74% of the program's overall budget this year. There are about 33,000 wild horses on the range and another 30,000 in holding facilities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 2009 | Tony Perry
The San Diego Zoo is joining the federal effort to save the threatened desert tortoise, officials announced Saturday. Zoo specialists will aid the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in operating the 250-acre tortoise conservation center near Las Vegas, home to about 1,000 desert tortoises. The center is run by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Biologists from the zoo will monitor the health of the tortoises and help those that are ailing. Bob Williams, Nevada field supervisor for the Fish and Wildlife Service, called the agreement "a great step forward" in saving the desert tortoise from extinction.
SCIENCE
May 13, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
Ranchers often argue that cattle grazing is the best way to combat cheatgrass, an aggressive invader that has taken over vast areas of the Great Basin, destroying the native sagebrush ecosystem and fueling huge wildfires. But a study published today in the Journal of Applied Ecology arrives at the opposite conclusion. Reseachers who studied 75 Great Basin sites invaded by cheatgrass found that greater grazing intensity promoted the alien's spread. “Our findings raise serious concerns regarding proposals to use cattle grazing to control [cheatgrass]
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996
It appears there is little hope for your editorial staff to understand natural resource and land management issues (" 'Reform' Bills for the Round File," editorial, Feb. 26). First, the emergency salvage law is not "logging without laws" as environmentalists claim, but a streamlining of the cumbersome and litigious process of approving timber sales on the most unhealthy and fire-prone forests on federal lands, rather "logging without litigation." It is a short-term environmental and economic fix that President Clinton signed last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988
One needs to have sympathy for the plight in which Walter Bickel finds himself: accused of "squatting" on Bureau of Land Management lands ("Time Running Out for Old Prospector's Desert Mining Camp," Part I, Sept. 20). Clearly there is the making of human tragedy there and government officials should act accordingly. Contributing to this predicament, however, has been the BLM's deliberate and chronic neglect of its stewardship of federal lands. Now that agency contends that at last it has the funds and personnel to do what it should have been doing all along.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993
Having spent literally hundreds of hours of staff time working with reporter Warren Olney, we are surprised and disappointed with his poor understanding of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) land exchange program in California ("Psst, Wanna Buy 5 Acres for $100?" Commentary, Jan. 7). The BLM exchanges land for fair market value. Qualified BLM appraisers are required under laws set by Congress to find current and comparable private land sales and to utilize those sales in determining the value of public lands.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
President Obama on Monday established five new national monuments, including one in Washington's San Juan Islands and one in northern New Mexico. The Río Grande del Norte National Monument elevates protections for 242,550 acres of U.S. Bureau of Land Management holdings northwest of Taos. A variety of wildlife, 500-year-old trees and extinct volcanoes are found in the monument, which lies between the San Juan and Sangre de Cristo mountain ranges. The monument includes parts of the 800-foot-deep Rio Grande Gorge, carved by the river as it flows across highlands that feature petroglyphs and archaeological sites.
NATIONAL
March 6, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LAS VEGAS  - A national animal advocacy group excoriated the federal government, saying it misled the public about last week's removal of 11 wild mustangs that had coexisted for years with residents of a populated area outside Carson City, Nev. The Humane Society of the United States has called for the Bureau of Land Management to return the animals to the wild, rather than following through on plans to put them up for adoption. “The Humane Society of the United States denounces the Bureau of Land Management's decision to remove a small band of wild horses located just east of Carson City, Nev., in the Pine Nut Herd Management Area,” according to a statement released by the group Tuesday.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan rejected a request to halt the roundup of about 190 wild horses in the Pryor Mountains along the Montana-Wyoming border. Two Colorado-based advocacy groups had sought an injunction. The Bureau of Land Management, which operates the 38,000-acre Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, said the roundup would begin today. The agency intends to capture the range's entire population, with 70 adult horses and their foals to be kept for adoption. The rest will be freed after some of the mares are given a contraceptive vaccine, the BLM said.
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