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NEWS
March 11, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The California Coastal National Monument runs the length of the state and is filled with offshore islands, reefs and rocks -- until now. President Obama on Tuesday will add 1,665 onshore acres near Mendocino to the parkland said to be the most viewed but least recognized of U.S. national monuments. Point Arena-Stornetta Public Lands , as the new area is known, will receive added federal protection for a stretch of breathtaking shoreline north of Port Arena. Locals who campaigned to beef up the federal parkland hope to stimulate tourism to the area.
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OPINION
March 7, 2012 | By Robert H. Nelson
Like much else in government, U.S. public land policy is a vestige of the past, established in 1910 when America's population was just 92.2 million and a Western state such as Nevada had only 81,000 residents. Today our needs are much different and much greater. The United States can no longer afford to keep tens of millions of acres of "public" land locked up and out of service. Some of these lands have great commercial value; others are environmental treasures. We need policies capable of distinguishing between the two. Few Easterners realize the immense magnitude of the public lands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996
It appears there is little hope for your editorial staff to understand natural resource and land management issues (" 'Reform' Bills for the Round File," editorial, Feb. 26). First, the emergency salvage law is not "logging without laws" as environmentalists claim, but a streamlining of the cumbersome and litigious process of approving timber sales on the most unhealthy and fire-prone forests on federal lands, rather "logging without litigation." It is a short-term environmental and economic fix that President Clinton signed last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 5, 1988
One needs to have sympathy for the plight in which Walter Bickel finds himself: accused of "squatting" on Bureau of Land Management lands ("Time Running Out for Old Prospector's Desert Mining Camp," Part I, Sept. 20). Clearly there is the making of human tragedy there and government officials should act accordingly. Contributing to this predicament, however, has been the BLM's deliberate and chronic neglect of its stewardship of federal lands. Now that agency contends that at last it has the funds and personnel to do what it should have been doing all along.
NATIONAL
November 14, 2012 | By John M. Glionna
An investigative journalist who has reported on the federal government's alleged sale of hundreds of wild horses to a known kill-buyer has released a video of a face-off in which Interior Secretary Ken Salazar threatens to punch him during an impromptu interview. Dave Philipps, now a reporter for the Colorado Springs Gazette, conducted a two-minute interview with the cowboy-hat-wearing Salazar, a Democrat, at an event taking place at an Obama campaign office in Fountain, Colo., on Election Day. In September, Philipps' article for the online ProPublica investigative group claimed the Bureau of Land Management, which manages hundreds of millions of acres of public land in 11 states, was knowingly selling wild horses to a middleman who is thought to have taken them to Mexico for eventual slaughter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1993
Having spent literally hundreds of hours of staff time working with reporter Warren Olney, we are surprised and disappointed with his poor understanding of the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) land exchange program in California ("Psst, Wanna Buy 5 Acres for $100?" Commentary, Jan. 7). The BLM exchanges land for fair market value. Qualified BLM appraisers are required under laws set by Congress to find current and comparable private land sales and to utilize those sales in determining the value of public lands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | By Rick Rojas
A $5.8-million settlement has been reached with the relatives of those killed and a dozen who were injured when a truck competing in an off-road desert race careened into a crowd of spectators, their lawyers announced Wednesday. In the 2010 accident in the desert near Victorville, the truck, a modified Ford Ranger, went out of control during the California 200 race and went airborne, slamming into the crowd, killing eight and injuring dozens. The settlement, reached Tuesday, includes 12 of those injured.  Lawyers said the bulk of the settlement - about $4.8 million - would be paid by the Bureau of Land Management, which failed to follow its safety procedures during the race, an internal review found.
SCIENCE
March 25, 2013 | By Bettina Boxall
President Obama on Monday established five new national monuments, including one in Washington's San Juan Islands and one in northern New Mexico. The Río Grande del Norte National Monument elevates protections for 242,550 acres of U.S. Bureau of Land Management holdings northwest of Taos. A variety of wildlife, 500-year-old trees and extinct volcanoes are found in the monument, which lies between the San Juan and Sangre de Cristo mountain ranges. The monument includes parts of the 800-foot-deep Rio Grande Gorge, carved by the river as it flows across highlands that feature petroglyphs and archaeological sites.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. District Judge Emmet G. Sullivan rejected a request to halt the roundup of about 190 wild horses in the Pryor Mountains along the Montana-Wyoming border. Two Colorado-based advocacy groups had sought an injunction. The Bureau of Land Management, which operates the 38,000-acre Pryor Mountain Wild Horse Range, said the roundup would begin today. The agency intends to capture the range's entire population, with 70 adult horses and their foals to be kept for adoption. The rest will be freed after some of the mares are given a contraceptive vaccine, the BLM said.
OPINION
November 5, 2002
"White House Reinterpreting Law on Environmental Reviews" (Nov. 3) should wake all Americans to the very real threat of destruction to our national treasures. If the Bush administration succeeds in reversing current environmental laws, the legacy of unspoiled wilderness and wildlife habitat will be lost forever and will go the way of the rapidly disappearing rain forests. Our children will be denied the opportunity to observe and appreciate nature and all its marvels. This is not just an issue for environmentalists; it affects everyone.
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