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NEWS
June 29, 1992 | KENNETH REICH and JUDY PASTERNAK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Sunday morning's unusual seismic occurrence--separate big earthquakes 20 miles apart in rural San Bernardino County--resulted in the most strongly worded earthquake advisory ever issued by the state. Clearly taken by surprise by the twin temblors, which included the most powerful in California in 40 years, scientists joined the state Office of Emergency Services in the unprecedented public statement warning Southern California residents to prepare themselves for at least a large aftershock.
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NEWS
December 6, 1997 | From a Times Staff Writer
A magnitude 4.0 earthquake, one of more than 67,000 aftershocks of the 1992 Landers-Big Bear quakes, struck Friday morning near the San Andreas fault four miles northeast of Yucaipa, Caltech scientists said. No damage or injuries were reported in the 9:04 a.m. temblor, which was followed by several smaller jolts. Egill Hauksson, a Caltech seismologist, said Friday's quake was located in the same place as an active cluster of aftershocks that followed the main 7.3 Landers shock of June 28, 1992.
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NEWS
June 17, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A magnitude 5.0 aftershock rattled residents of Landers and the surrounding Morongo Basin desert region Thursday morning, unnerving even veterans of the powerful 1992 earthquake but prompting no reports of injuries or damage. "It wasn't like the one before but I was beginning to wonder because it was starting to wind up," said Tina Stockman, who with her husband owns the Grubstake restaurant in Landers.
NEWS
October 20, 1996
A magnitude 4.1 aftershock of the 1992 Landers earthquake shook Yucca Valley late Saturday afternoon, the Caltech Seismological Lab reported. The aftershock occurred at 5:17 p.m. and was centered about 34 miles north-northeast of Yucca Valley, Caltech seismologist Doug Given said.
NEWS
July 2, 1992 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Dana and Tina Hand, the parents of three small children, the transition from mere poverty to homelessness and desperation was surprisingly abrupt--the mere 30 seconds or so it took for Sunday's earthquake to rumble through their townhouse apartment. Besides depriving them of a home they consider safe, the quake and subsequent aftershocks have also undermined the foundation of the family's precarious existence, forcing them to sleep outside, seek donations and wonder about their future.
NEWS
June 30, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
They're a tough and resourceful breed, these people of the California desert. They joke of eating rattlesnakes and fighting off coyotes with sticks. Just because the strongest earthquake to hit the state in 40 years wiped out their water supply, tore up their roads, cut off their electricity and threatened to bring their isolated homes down about their ears--that doesn't mean they're about to quit. "We're desert rats.
NEWS
July 3, 1992 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Bush declared a federal disaster Thursday in San Bernardino and Riverside counties, paving the way for millions of dollars in U.S. funds to be funneled into earthquake-damaged areas. In the meantime, water service was gradually being restored to the hard-hit zones of Yucca Valley, 120 miles east of Los Angeles. But 1,500 households in nearby Landers--at the epicenter of Sunday morning's strongest temblor--were expected to remain without running water through the weekend.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just minutes after the magnitude 7.4 Landers earthquake last Sunday, an unexpected "surge of seismic activity," mainly very small earthquakes, began 250 miles away in the Long Valley Caldera near Mammoth Lakes, according to a report by the U.S. Geological Survey. The increase in what scientists often call "sympathetic" minor quakes continued all the way up the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada and into the Cascade range around Lassen Peak and Mt. Shasta. Mt.
NEWS
May 13, 1996
A magnitude 3.1 aftershock of the 1992 Landers earthquake occurred at 10:29 a.m. Sunday and was centered 12 miles northeast of Barstow, Caltech scientists said. The temblor took place in an area that has been a hot spot of Landers aftershocks, with hundreds of jolts recorded over the last four years in a six-mile-diameter circle.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | TOM GORMAN and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after the most powerful earthquake in California in 40 years ruptured the Mojave desert surface for 55 miles, scientists are avidly studying the event and residents still suffer traumatic memories. But already the public's interest in quake preparedness appears to be fading. It was a year ago today that the Landers quake, measured at magnitudes ranging from 7.3 to 7.6, jolted the West at 4:57 a.m., killing a small child and injuring 400 people.
NEWS
May 13, 1996
A magnitude 3.1 aftershock of the 1992 Landers earthquake occurred at 10:29 a.m. Sunday and was centered 12 miles northeast of Barstow, Caltech scientists said. The temblor took place in an area that has been a hot spot of Landers aftershocks, with hundreds of jolts recorded over the last four years in a six-mile-diameter circle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1995 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A magnitude 5.0 earthquake, the strongest aftershock of the 1992 Landers quake in nearly a year, struck before dawn Sunday in a sparsely populated, mountainous area of Joshua Tree National Park above Desert Hot Springs. No damage or injury reports were received after the 4:03 a.m. temblor, the Riverside County Sheriff's Department said. It was centered 15 miles northeast of Palm Springs and four miles south of the epicenter of the 6.
NEWS
June 17, 1994 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A magnitude 5.0 aftershock rattled residents of Landers and the surrounding Morongo Basin desert region Thursday morning, unnerving even veterans of the powerful 1992 earthquake but prompting no reports of injuries or damage. "It wasn't like the one before but I was beginning to wonder because it was starting to wind up," said Tina Stockman, who with her husband owns the Grubstake restaurant in Landers.
NEWS
June 28, 1993 | TOM GORMAN and KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year after the most powerful earthquake in California in 40 years ruptured the Mojave desert surface for 55 miles, scientists are avidly studying the event and residents still suffer traumatic memories. But already the public's interest in quake preparedness appears to be fading. It was a year ago today that the Landers quake, measured at magnitudes ranging from 7.3 to 7.6, jolted the West at 4:57 a.m., killing a small child and injuring 400 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1993 | MATT LAIT and LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Geologists suspect that the devastating Anaheim Hills landslide might have been triggered by the 7.4-magnitude Landers earthquake in June, Anaheim city spokesman Bret Colson said Wednesday. Also Wednesday, geologists in Laguna Beach released a report concluding that the mudslide there, which destroyed three homes, was caused by an ancient, reactivated landslide.
NEWS
December 4, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Another moderate aftershock of the Landers earthquake struck the Big Bear area Thursday night, and a Caltech scientist said it was on a fault that had not been active since before the magnitude 7.5 temblor on June 28. The magnitude 5.2 earthquake occurred at 6:08 p.m. and was felt in downtown Los Angeles as well as the San Fernando Valley, Hollywood and cities in Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino and San Diego counties. It was centered three miles north of the epicenter of last Friday's 5.
NEWS
August 3, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Los Angeles Basin moved about half an inch to the northwest as a result of the June 28 Landers and Big Bear earthquakes, according to calculations using satellite readings and sensitive ground-based instruments. More dramatic shifts were detected closer to the earthquake epicenters by scientists from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech and the Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul and Cathryn Roll have a more intimate acquaintance with the newly discovered Eureka Peak Fault than most residents near this much-shaken High Desert city: It runs right across the narrow yard between their house and swimming pool. On a hill adjacent to the Rolls' property, the fault that scientists first traced after the April 22 Joshua Tree earthquake--and became visible to all on the morning of the June 28 Landers quake--is now marked by a six-inch scarp, a vertical disruption.
NEWS
October 5, 1992 | KENNETH REICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Paul and Cathryn Roll have a more intimate acquaintance with the newly discovered Eureka Peak Fault than most residents near this much-shaken High Desert city: It runs right across the narrow yard between their house and swimming pool. On a hill adjacent to the Rolls' property, the fault that scientists first traced after the April 22 Joshua Tree earthquake--and became visible to all on the morning of the June 28 Landers quake--is now marked by a six-inch scarp, a vertical disruption.
NEWS
October 3, 1992
A magnitude 4.3 aftershock of the June 28 Landers earthquake occurred in the area of the main surface rupture of that temblor, about 20 miles northeast of Lucerne Valley, at 12:19 a.m. Friday, Caltech scientists said. No damage or injuries were reported in the desert area.
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